For those of you in the south that got heavy snow accumulations

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For those of you not in snow country.. Some of you got dumped on..
It pays to get the snow off the 1st 2 feet of the roof. I have a snow rake and get about 4 feet off. But assuming most of you southerners don't have it.
Take a broom and try to get the 2 feet at the bottom of your roofs cleared. It may save you lots of money in rotted wood, or your shop if you have a basement shop.
Years ago the ice damn caused a lot of water to run inside the house and it travelled the joists and soaked a lot of wood and also rusted a lot of stuff.
Just an FYI..
--
Jeff

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On 1/29/2014 11:59 AM, woodchucker wrote:

Your roof isn't constructed right. If it was, what you describe wouldn't happen.
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On 1/29/2014 2:34 PM, Just Wondering wrote:

Yep, I have never worried about it in Canada is the 17 years I have been in this house, never a problem. Those in the deep south do not need to worry, it will all be melted in a couple days anyway.
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On 1/29/2014 2:51 PM, FrozenNorth wrote:

It's the melting and freezing that's the problem. When night comes and it refreezes it creates damns then the water runs under the shingles when it melts again, since it can't go past the ice., and that's when you have problems.
Here in NJ, the roofs generally are pitched for moderate snow. Heavier snows will cause problems.
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On Wed, 29 Jan 2014 14:51:27 -0500, FrozenNorth

What kind of roof do you have that you don't have to worry about ice dams?
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On 1/29/2014 11:38 PM, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

Very steep, story and a half post WW2 house, you couldn't pay me enough to climb on that thing, got it reshingled, they charge extra because of the steep pitch.
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On Thu, 30 Jan 2014 01:22:52 -0500, FrozenNorth

My parent's house was the exact opposite. It was a farmhouse built circa 1825 and had an extremely low pitch. To prevent the snow and ice buildup we ran heating wires zigzagging about two feet up all along the back of the house.
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On Wed, 29 Jan 2014 23:38:57 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

Keep the roof at a constant temperature and you won't get ice dams. The problem arises then ice melts in the center of the roof and refreezes at the soffits, where it's cooler. The idea is to ventilate the roof so that it stays the same temperature across the span, as over the soffits.
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On 1/29/2014 2:34 PM, Just Wondering wrote:

Really. Ice damning is a normal occurrence. I do not have an A frame house which is geared to shed the snow much more easily.
But most roofs unless pitched excessively will not shed the snow.
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On 1/29/2014 12:52 PM, woodchucker wrote:

So what? If a roof is constructed properly, ice damming will not cause water to do what you describe. There are millions of properly constructed roofs to prove it.
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On Wed, 29 Jan 2014 12:54:45 -0700, Just Wondering

And millions that are not as water tight, so to err on the side of caution is not a bad idea. I have found it really difficult to determine whether it is "constructed right" by looking from the ground.
Mark
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On 1/29/2014 3:05 PM, Markem wrote:

Properly installed, "water and ice shield", you should be able to see it under the drip edge, where it has been rolled over the fascia ... you just have to get close enough to see if it's there.
It it is over the drip edge, the installation is suspect.
Amazingly enough, we do spec "water and ice shield" in our roofing contracts down here in Texas ... at least those interested in doing things right do.
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But if you now have a nice accumulation of snow and do not "know" go out and do the broom thing, get a bit of exercise too.
If it was my house getting a new roof, I would go for over kill and do the whole roof with "water and ice shield". But the over the eaves and valleys is best building practice for a roof.
My roof does not have any of the shielding, it has had over a foot of snow maybe three times in the 6 years we have been here. It does not leak, it is 3/12 pitch.
Mark
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My guy in Bufallo had his office in his house.
At least twice a year his wife would call in and tell us Jim was shoveling off the roof after a storm not only to keep ice dams from forming but also to reduce the snow load on the roof.
Every time we got that call could just visualize Jim loosing his balance and sliding off the roof.
Never happened, but still didn't keep me from sweating the operation out until Jim got back in the house and off the roof.
Housing codes vary all over the country.
You can use an asphalt shingle roof in the North East & Midwest, but they are about as useful as tits on a boar hog in the desert SW where tile does a better job.
Different horses for different courses.
Lew
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On Wed, 29 Jan 2014 12:54:45 -0700, Just Wondering

Built for southern conditions, then hit with snow, could conseivably cause ide dam problems. We build differently in snow zones.
A "properly constructed" roof in Atlanta or New Orleans would not be built to handle snow and freeze-thaw cycles.
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On Wed, 29 Jan 2014 17:54:25 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I see no difference in the (new home) roof construction here, compared to the construction in Vermont. Roofs on newer homes tend to be steeper, here, in fact. No idea why.
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On 01/29/2014 12:59 PM, woodchucker wrote:

I have never seen an ice dam form in AL. usually or snow events last for 10 hours or so and melt completely in a day or so.
If we have a mini ice age, I'll heed your warning.
What most southerners could really benefit from is rudimentary driving lessons, for instance yesterday there was a little over an inch on the roads, it's cold enough that it is a dry blowing snow over some pack ice on the roads. People drove in the ditches by the tens of thousands. I don't understand it.
I don't claim any great driving skill but I managed to drive 150 plus miles in the same mess without any problems. (in a two wheel drive pickup)
basilisk
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On 1/29/2014 2:37 PM, basilisk wrote:

Apparently a good many northerners could benefit also?
https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/930iiph8d5m1D1NGmrUb1NMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink
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On 01/29/2014 03:23 PM, Swingman wrote:

No doubt, there could be some benefit all around the Country. Al has zero requirements for drivers education other than a short written test and a very limited road test. If the parents aren't responsible enough to teach their kids, it is basically here are the keys take off. It ends badly too often.

I'm surprised really that the Northern states aren't worse than shown, considering the amount of snow that they have and the large populations.
Alabama probably averages less than one day a year of snow and ice.
Texas looks high, but on the other hand, the Dallas metro area alone has 1.5 times the entire population of Alabama.
basilisk
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On 1/29/2014 2:37 PM, basilisk wrote: ...

The primary problem is they simply won't slow down sufficiently enough to even have a half-chance when they do lose it when either
a) somebody in front loses it, b) they try to pass on icy lane and lose it, c) they try to stop themselves
as the primary instigators.
I'm always simply amazed at how many UPS drivers seem no better, nationwide. They must be in the OTR race for rollovers and landing in medians/ditches by an order of magnitude or more compared the rest of the national carrier brands...
We had just a couple of inches Monday night that left a fairly slick surface on the blacktop bypass around town Tuesday. I'd run to town for the mail after shoveling the walks off and doing chores and was about plowed over by an oversize load guy while in the turn lane to make the turn on our road waiting for oncoming. I was getting ready to head on straight and hit the ditch behind the other guy when he did finally manage to straighten it out but wasn't but a few lengths behind me when he did...again, nothing but idiocy of trying to drive 50 in 30 mph conditions. There were enough tracks that even his load rig started swinging from one to another and when he tried to shut 'er down he did it too quickly...very easy to see what was happening; not much of anywhere to go w/ the other one coming over the hill from the south.
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