Foot wear

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Yes this is on topic,
I would like to ask those of you who have work areas that are on some form of concrete, what kind of shoes do you wear while there? Do you use any kind of mats to stand on? Last, but not least are you flat footed?
No I am not going to try to sell you something, just want to know what I need to change to help my legs and back while standing in the shop. Being 300lbs does not help, I know.
I have never really been able to say for sure that being flat footed has been a problem for me, but I may need to look for different shoes while standing for long periods of time in the work shop.
Thanks for your input!
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vdubbs wrote:

Man, I feel your pain. My floor is wood, I'm not flat-footed, and I only weigh 165, but I still have foot and back pain when I stand in the shop for extended periods. I've tried walking shoes and running shoes, but the best footwear I've found is lightweight hiking boots. My favorites are Sierra Lites by Hi Tech. They won't break the bank at only about $65 a pair. They have better arch support than either of the others, and my back seems to hurt less too. I'm not sure how being flat-footed would effect that equation.
DonkeyHody "You may not always get what you pay for, but you always pay for what you get."
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Two flatfooted females in my family. Only thing they've found other than the orthotics is Birkenstocks. Both of them are able to wear and walk in them for extended periods. I do insist they break the "rules" of Birkenstocks and shave their legs, though.
Keep a couple of different heel heights available, wear orthotics or Birkenstocks - I have clogs - and if you're turning a long time, put a six by six chunk where you can raise one foot on it while turning. Does wonders for the back as it transfers the load.
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I am flat footed and weigh more than 350lb. orthonics help but the anti stress rubber mats help in my shop (concrete floors)
len
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I'll second the birkenstocks - no doubt the most comfortable shoes/sandals I've ever tried (once they're broken in). They do make shoes also, including hiking boots and safety shoes with steel toes - they cost a lot, but worth it in my opinion, and you might find a deal on ebay. I haven't tried the anti-fatigue mat yet, but now that they're on sale at Rockler, I'm going to very soon. Andy
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I have a couple different types of anti-fatigue mats in my shop and they do help extend the amount of time I can stay on my feet. I recommend them to anyone that do not have them and stand on concrete. As for shoes, I have tried many different kinds of shoes and cheap tennis shoes are by far the worst for me. I have a high dollar pair of safety shoes that are great as long as you are moving(walking) and not standing constantly. If I stand in them for extended periods, like doing lathe work and such, my ankles and lower back just kill me and it even lingers into the next day as well. I plan on going to a foot doc in the near future just to be sure I don't have a foot problem coming on. This last year it all has gotten worse. I know age has nothing to do with it either.........LOL!! Just turn 40 last month, and compared to some on here that is young by a long shot.
I will have to look into the Birkenstocks, my wife like to wear them. I just would never thought about them as a shop shoe. Go figure!
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For about 18 years and standing on concrete I wear Rockport Hiking shoes.

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Leon (in U_9xf.60863$ snipped-for-privacy@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com) said:
| For about 18 years and standing on concrete I wear Rockport Hiking | shoes.
I've worn the same for the last three years. I weigh 150 and have flat feet. I have 1/4" thick rubber pads in front of tools where I stand for more than a half hour at a time - and the pads do make a considerable difference.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
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I think that the problem needs to be tackled in a different way, though shoes are not to be discounted, a lot of that I believe is marketing. I think that flexibility and strength are the key factors in lower back and leg pain. For three years I have done my best to attend a weekly Pilates and yoga class. The Pilates concentrates on core strength and the yoga on flexibility. All of my back issues have completely gone away once I started on this path. I am 45 years old, while this is not old, it is old enough to start having these problems.
I am pretty sure that if the hamstrings are flexible and the stomach/core is strong then shoes will not be quite as critical. I hope I did not offend anyone, I am usually a lurker, but I truly feel strongly about this. As we get older and the years of sitting start effecting us more all of these things start to take their toll. I am not the great all knowing one, but have just found that this works for me and hopefully for someone else also.
thanks.
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mike wrote:

Yep,
In '94 I apparently tried to destroy my spinal cord. I was able to recover without surgery. I lost 2 years, but I was able to do some light work in limited amounts. I also weigh 165,, give or take 5lb. Physical training is important to all of us. I slack off occasionally and I can tell a difference in everything I do from the way I walk to the way I feel when I sneeze. A back injury stays with you for the rest of your life. I'm 40, doing much better than I was at 30.
I wear Wolverines, Wellingtons. I add arch support when I'm breaking them in, and replace the supports annually. I wear one pair to work every day. I've had them for 3 years now. Another pair waits in the closet and goes with me on Sundays until they're broke-in.
Mats in the shop? Oh - Yeah, Imagine what a Kentucky boy uses for shop mats. Coal mine conveyor belts. They're 4' wide and cut with a utility knife. Stiff rubber with a fabric inner layer that makes them last forever under foot traffic. Usually cheap too! Sometimes I can get them for free in sections 3' to 12' long. Over 6' long and it's all I can do to handle them by myself. That stuff is HEAVY. They make fantastic p-up truck bed liners too.
Tom in KY, You've only got one back, when it's gone, well, you'd be surprised what all else goes away with it!
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Well, I am no light weight (265), and my feet and back tend to get irritated when I stand at the lathe for long periods of time. I do have some mats on the floor, and they help. I can't wear Birkenstocks because of my foot shape, but New Balance makes shoes in the wide sizes. I do a couple of things to help. I think posture is a big thing in eliminating back pain. It is an effort because I don't think as much about sucking in the old gut to impress the ladies as I used to. Strengthening the stomach and back muscles will keep the back in line. Having the lathe at the proper height is another big factor. If you have to bend over at the waist to turn anything, that will put stress on your back (most of us walk erect). Also, I wear pressure stockings. Not the prescription type (yet) but the Dr. Scholls (I think)style. They make a big difference on how your feet feel at the end of the day. Some times I will take a break and hit the exercycle for a few minutes to get tho blood flowing again. Tap your feet in time to the music. Shift your weight back and forth. Oh yes, this year I will loose some of those ghosts from Christmas Pasts. robo hippy
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mike wrote:

Agree totally. I can't believe that these obese posters think that what they put *under* their feet will fix the problems they've caused by what they put *over* them.
Go for a decent *fast* walk for an hour, 4-5 miles, a couple of times a week, your hammies and glutes will gain so much tone they'll hold your pelvis upright and suck your gut in, stop it hanging forward and dragging your back further out of line. You might even lose some of that excess weight. I wasn't overweight, but when I started walking *hard* for one hour a week, I lost a Kg (2.2lb) *each week* for the first 8 weeks.
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Clifford Heath wrote:

There you go. Just the thing for everyone. Unfortunately, after three knee surgeries, none caused by obesity, and arthritis in my feet, a fast walk is something I watch other people do. I'd guess some more of us fat slobs who put too much "over" our feet are in the same boat, whether from injury or illness.
What you can or can't believe has no relevance outside your own family.
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Amen, Charlie.
Lots of things are righteously correct until you get a bullet through an ankle, or pelvis broken in half, or emphyzema from smoking too many years - and a new wife who cooks great food.
TomNie

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Oh, man. No bullet strikes, just too much time falling off of off-road motorcycles, sometimes with the bike on top. Do that for 10-15 years, and zing. Add in a genetic predisposition to arthritis, COPD (I quit smoking nearly 17 years ago, about a decade later than was really helpful), and a second wife, who, while not new, is one helluva country cook.
I haven't hit 300 yet, but I've come much too close at times, though I'm now slowly--ever so slowly--backing off. But until I quit smoking, I still only weighed about 210 or 215 at the most, and could still drop a pound or two by missing a meal. These days, I gain weight at the thought of food.
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I hear you Charlie. There is something about reading a cook book that puts on 10 pounds these days. I can not even blame it on my wife (first and only, I hope), I do the cooking. The old hair seems a bit grayer too. Funny, it does not appear to have anything to do with footwear. I am a little envious over folks who have enough time in a work shop to worry about it hurting a back, but not envious enough to have back pain.
--
God bless and safe turning
Darrell Feltmate
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Darrell Feltmate wrote:

I wish my shop time was invested in building things more often than cleaning and shooting photos.
Right now, I'm wearing a pair of slip-on $30 LL Bean shoes, with VA prescribed orthotic inserts. My back has never been a shop problem, but my feet and knees can make up for that with any other footwear. I'm supposed to be getting some orthotic shoes in a week or 10 days. Probably combine those with the inserts and see what happens.
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Charlie Self wrote:

This has been a good thread, mostly, I now have some things to look into and some I have tried already.
I fly a desk as my vocation as an IT administrator and sitting on my arse eating bonbons all day does nothing for my school girl figure. This I do know does nothing for my health, but 30 years of putting it on will not drop off overnight by walking 10 miles daily with the wrong shoes on.
Thanks Folks for the useful info.
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Charlie Self wrote:

Yup, there's exceptions to every rule, of course. But there's no good reason that even a sedentary person should let themselves get to 300lb, though it's much easier if you can exercise.
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Clifford Heath wrote:

I see the hook in that worm..........I am not bitting.
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