Fluorescent shop light question


I was in the shop a couple of days ago, when one of the fluorescent fixtures stopped working. It wasn't in my line of sight at the time, but I think there was a pop and flash, followed by darkness. It's a newish fixture with an electronic ballast. I suspect that the ballast went kablooie, but I don't know how to test it, if it's even possible for me to test the output. I'd appreciate any pointers.
todd
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wrote:

Swap the tubes with another fixture: if they work there, well, it's not like there are dozens of *other* parts that could have failed.
(Peel off the 'Lucas' label while you're at it, that's a good lad.)
Lee
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fixtures
with
output.
The tubes are fine. I pulled the thing apart and got to thinking that unless the pull switch is busted, there really isn't much else that can go wrong other than the ballast.
todd
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Nope. So you're SOL for that light. Maybe a return/replacement, since it was new? They just don't build anything like they used to. If this trend continues, pretty soon things are going to start breaking before the manufacturer can get them packed and shipped!
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If it is an heavy duty commercial fixture, buy a new ballast. If it is a typical homeowner special from the big box store, buy another for half the price of a ballast.
I have an undercounter kitchen fixture. I can buy a new fixture for 50 more than just the replacement bulb.
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wrote in message

I hear ya. I have had to replace a couple of those. The last one, I could buy the fixture all over town. But no one sold a replacement bulb (tube).
GE does this. They have big, fancy displays of their fixtures. But only bulbs for a couple of them.
If you are going to buy any kind of undercounter light, check first for ECONOMICAL replacement bulbs. Then buy the fixture that matches. I am on my third fixture. The one I had before was an 18 volt, 24 inch tube. The only one I could find that matched actually cost about 50% more than the original fixture and tube.
But I can buy 15 volt, 18 inch tubes with no problem. So that is the fixture I went with. I also bought a couple replacement tubes. I am in good shape for awhile. Most of those under counter fixtures are considered to be disposable.
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wrote:

It used to be that you could by an HP Inkjet printer for about the same cost as a set of replacement ink cartridges. They musta got wise to that and only fill the supplied ones with a token amount of ink.
They should just give away the printers so they have a bigger market for supplies.
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I buy the cheap strip lights that take the regular old tubes...always available and very long lived. I have lost a ballast and replaced the whole fixture, for about $15. I make the bottom face frame rail of the wall cabinets wide enough to hide the fixtures...about 3.5" and the top rail anything over about 2", same as the sides. I have two 4' and one 18".You can see them glowing on ABPW, Kitchen for Chuck. Wilson
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Not knowing any more specifics about your fixture, IMHO your best bet both from a cost and longevity standpoint would be to replace the ballast with a universal replacement ballast that covers the type of bulbs your fixture requires. It will run 12-17$ at HD depending on whether or not you get a magnetic or electronic unit. The magnetic unit will use a slight amount more power, but for a single shop light that is negligible. The reason a universal replacement is my recommendation is because the universal must span a range of different types of tubes and fixtures so it is likely you will get a ballast slightly over built for your application. A class P rating is also desirable to help insure it doesn't make too much noise and will start right up without flicker when cold. Good luck, Joe.
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