Flooring a C shaped corridor

I am putting down a floor in a C shaped corridor. The landing off the top of the stairs is approximately 1.5m wide and 5m long - the stairs lands roughly in the middle. There are two corridors running off each end of the landing at 90 degrees, these are also about 4m long and around 1m wide. What do people think is the best orientation for the boards? Thanks in advance.
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On 10/14/2011 5:42 PM, Bowsider wrote:

Lengthwise down the halls; not sure the exact geometry of the landing area in comparison. Nothing says can't have a turning if needed but if the landing is parallel to that same direction it would seem the logical way it ought to run.
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I am putting down a floor in a C shaped corridor. The landing off the top of the stairs is approximately 1.5m wide and 5m long - the stairs lands roughly in the middle. There are two corridors running off each end of the landing at 90 degrees, these are also about 4m long and around 1m wide. What do people think is the best orientation for the boards? Thanks in advance.
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Lengthwise in all 3 sections. Join the corners in either a herringbone or 45 miter. Art
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wrote:

My choice would depend on the length of the flooring. If it were say 1 meter wide and a single board would cover the hallway, I would go against the convention and run it across the two sides of the "C" and then run it the long dimension in front of the stairs. It would be boring, but it would have fewer joints and be fairly quick to install. I know this goes against the wood worker in me who did all the hallways long dimension and did an edge in contrasting materials, that caused me about an extra week of evening time.
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That's ignoring wood movement. Doing it that way you're guaranteed to get more and larger gaps between boards as the wood moves with the season.
I'm also not sure that cutting every board and running the boards across the width of the hallway would work for other reasons. When you buy wood strip flooring the bundles are of assorted lengths. They're not all 40"+ long. You could specify that when you order them (or make them), but you'd be paying out the nose (or sucking down way more time then any potential time savings in laying them AND paying out the nose).
If someone is going to go to all of that effort, they certainly should dress up the hallway with feature strips, etc. Not sure if that's what the OP has in mind for his time and money.
R
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Run them all on a 45 degree angle. The pieces will all be shorter and it always looks classy!
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"RicodJour" wrote in message
That's ignoring wood movement. Doing it that way you're guaranteed to get more and larger gaps between boards as the wood moves with the season.
I'm also not sure that cutting every board and running the boards across the width of the hallway would work for other reasons. When you buy wood strip flooring the bundles are of assorted lengths. They're not all 40"+ long. You could specify that when you order them (or make them), but you'd be paying out the nose (or sucking down way more time then any potential time savings in laying them AND paying out the nose).
If someone is going to go to all of that effort, they certainly should dress up the hallway with feature strips, etc. Not sure if that's what the OP has in mind for his time and money.
R
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If your subfloor is suitably robust - such as 3/4" plywood or the equivalent, you could either do a herringbone throughout (takes a _lot_ more time, but the hallway flooring wouldn't seem to have a directional change), or run the boards the long way and either use a herringbone (not really the right term here) to make the transition, or box out the corners and do a design at the hallway transitions. Any of those could look good, your opinion being the final arbiter, and time, money and effort will come into play.
http://www.woodfloorschool.com/photos_09-13-14-15-2007/Decorative_flooring_school_05.jpg
http://www.pbase.com/lookoutranch/image/111809017.jpg
http://i540.photobucket.com/albums/gg352/ravi2patel/us-jan-09008.jpg
R
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Bowsider wrote:

The conventional standard is lenghwise with the longer dimension.
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On Fri, 14 Oct 2011 15:42:13 -0700 (PDT), Bowsider

the stairs is approximately 1.5m wide and 5m long - the stairs lands roughly in the middle. There are two corridors running off each end of the landing at 90 degrees, these are also about 4m long and around 1m wide. What do people think is the best orientation for the boards? Thanks in advance. Horizontal, not vertical. Nexxxxxxxxxxxxt!
-- Every day I remind myself that my inner and outer life are based on the labors of other men, living and dead, and that I must exert myself in order to give in the same measure as I have received and am still receiving. -- Albert Einstein
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This is one of those cases where I'd do something crazy like curving the flooring to match the C shape... Obviously it's completely custom work but I'm not always good about controlling my woodworking urges. For example, I'm building new pressure treated exterior stairs down to my dog run and I'm using riser boards mitered to fit mitered stringers and I radiused the end cuts of the treads on the shaper. If it ever stops raining and dries out I might actually be able to install them!
John
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wrote:

Are you suggesting he steam bends the wood strips to curve around the corners...? That I'd like to see! ;)
R
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wrote:

That would be interesting... maybe reduce the width to 1 1/8" to facilitate smooth bends? The grain would flow better that what I was thinking.
What I had in mind was milling curved strip flooring on the shaper where the curve matches the shape of the C. Relatively short pieces would be used so there isn't too much grain running out of the sides. A pattern could be used to get the curved shape and then mill the tongue and groove afterwards. I'm making an assumption here that the C has a continuous, circular, curve rather than being a true C shape which is more oblong. If it's oblong the radius changes which would be really tricky to mill but might make for an interesting challenge. ;~)
John
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On Oct 15, 8:41am, "John Grossbohlin"

I think the OP's C-shaped corridor is probably rectilinear with two 90 degree corners. That would be much more typical.
R
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wrote:

I think the OP's C-shaped corridor is probably rectilinear with two 90 degree corners. That would be much more typical.
R
Could be... a case where a graphic would help...
John
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The floor area in question is a long hallway and a cooridor at 90 degrees at each end. There is no curve so unfotunately no crazy flooring need apply! I mainly was looking for the best solution to turn a 90 degree corner. Thanks for the photos attached above. Ill probably just but joint it at 90 degrees as the herring bone will take far too much time and expense.
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Bummer on the lack of need for crazy flooring... ;~)

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On Sun, 16 Oct 2011 00:56:12 -0700 (PDT), Bowsider

each end. There is no curve so unfotunately no crazy flooring need apply! I mainly was looking for the best solution to turn a 90 degree corner. Thanks for the photos attached above. Ill probably just but joint it at 90 degrees as the herring bone will take far too much time and expense. If you reconsider, 45 degree miters at the two corners would look the best, and would not be too difficult to mate up.
-- ...in order that a man may be happy, it is necessary that he should not only be capable of his work, but a good judge of his work. -- John Ruskin
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wrote:

Miters...why? It's a fair bit more work, doesn't work well with prefinished flooring with already eased edges, the mitered ends would have to be grooved and splines installed, and the corner still wouldn't be as strong as simply weaving the corners.
I agree the KISS approach is the best for the hallway.
R
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"RicodJour" wrote in message wrote:

Miters...why? It's a fair bit more work, doesn't work well with prefinished flooring with already eased edges, the mitered ends would have to be grooved and splines installed, and the corner still wouldn't be as strong as simply weaving the corners.
I agree the KISS approach is the best for the hallway.
R
=======================Depends on who is coming over to do it!
--
Eric


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