Flooring

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Anyone here has any experience with plywood flooring? http://www.braitmandesign.com/home-remodeling-all-projects/advice-for-homeowners-looking-to-remodel/plywood-flooring-attractive-inexpensive-option/2100/
I am considering this as an inexpensive alternative to other flooring. Almost all (bathrooms can wait a bit) all of the flooring for 1400 sq ft home needs replacing. Currently it is 70% carpet, 20% sheet vinyl and 10% vinyl squares.
Carpet is 20 years old, worn and coming apart at all the seams. Twenty year old sheet vinyl isn't as bad; one major hole in washroom and two small ones in bathrooms; mostly it's all discoloring. Vinyl tiles are press-n-stick to OSB and are shifting badly. My hunch is the texture of the OSB isn't right for those kind of tiles.
I'm trying to ascertain how well plywood will hold up, if properly treated, and how difficult is it to put down. I've seen some wild patterns but I plan to stick to a simple design, maybe a fancier edge or something depending on cost and labor (if I do this myself).
Would standard wood flooring treatments be enough on plywood? Or are there better, less expensive options. I don't want a 'cheap' floor, or cheap looking. I can't afford right now to shell out 6-7k or more (price quotes) for vinyl planks, even though I do like the look and quality of those.
Yes I have been searching for other options. Yes I have checked pricing everywhere I could find within a reasonable distance. I really would prefer to do this all as one floor and keep the cost down, especially if I end up having to pay for labor. Thoughts?
`Casper
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On Friday, February 13, 2015 at 12:25:25 PM UTC-6, Casper wrote:

I'm supposing this home is on pillars, not a slab.
I might suspect the OSB has started to expand because of moisture, over tim e. I suspect you'd need to pull up the OSB, if its damaged that way, or i n any way. It may no longer be a proper subflooring, anymore. Do you kno w if there is other subflooring, under the OSB, and if it's in good shape?
A moisture barrier is a consideration, somewhere in the mix. Is there pres ently one and is it still in good shape.
I'm not familiar with plywood flooring, but I suppose you'd have to glue it down, maybe toe-nailed on the edges. You'd need a good subfloor to glue it to.
Other than these thoughts, I have no info/knowledge on the ply flooring an d for what type of home it's best recommended for, i.e., pillared or slab, if applicable.
Sonny
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Neither. Manufacture (mobile) home.

OSB (only think I can see) looks fine except a bit dirty where some of the peel-n-stick tiles have moved out of alignment.

Been 20 years and OSB and floor looks solid and dry. We've got a ton of insulation and very think barrier underneath the eniter home.

Seems some like the nails but I don't particularly. I see many being glued down. If you Google plywood flooring, you'll see ton and a number of them are quite professional looking.

Thanks for the input.
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On 2/13/15 12:25 PM, Casper wrote:

I am considering this as an inexpensive alternative to other

I would worry about the seems when using plywood. The subfloor would have to be very, very flat and true for me to even consider it. You're talking four foot seems in both directions for every "tile." The slightest bit of dip or rise four feet away is going to mess up the seem and cause a lip.
One advantage of a laminated, engineered "plank" system is its ability ride the rises and dips in the subfloor.
As for the finish... there's almost nothing you can do on your own that will match the durability and thickness of the finishes they can put on in the factory at a flooring manufacturer. I'm always amazed at how durable that stuff is.
--

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Sounds like you are assuming 4ft x 8ft. I have no intention of laying out full sheets. I would either cut down into planks or squares.

Wood floors can do that too if they are installed correctly. I have seen parquet floors and regular hardwood done badly.

A factory can do both good and bad finishes. A friend had laminate installed, professionally, and it is now buckling and peeling. I told him it was not a good choice for his kitchen but he wouldn't listen. His family makes too much of a watery mess for that flooring.
Again, if it were in my budget, I would get the vinyl laminate I have already picked out but locally there is nothing under $5sq/ft+fees. Home Despot or Lowes has that stuff on a roll that I don't want.
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On 02/13/2015 02:23 PM, Casper wrote:

Lowes has Bruce 3/8" floating engineered wood flooring for $2.99 sq/ft. It's 3" wide and random length. I put it in my house and love it.
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Well, I'm glad your satisfied, but...
Bruce is extremely low quality and badly lacking in durability. At $2.99 sq, I'd say it's substantially overpriced.
You can probably find Anderson for not much more (altho you might have to order it shipped, which adds to the cost). Anderson is a much higher quality product.
Incidently, I would advise against buying any kind of wood flooring at either Home Depot or Lowes. Not only is the product cheap (in the quality sense), but the glue they carry is also a lesser-quality glue. You won't pay a whole lot more if you go to a flooring dealer.
(btw, you do not want to tear out a glue-down floor, so make sure you choose right the first time. Don't ask me how I know this...)
John
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On 02/14/2015 01:13 PM, John McCoy wrote:

My flooring is floating over a concrete slab. Been in for about 4 years with no signs of wear or other problems. Not sure why you're so negative on Bruce flooring. Do you have experience with it?
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I said don't ask how I know about tearing out a glue-down floor :-)
Had to take up a Bruce floor which did not hold up in a home office...the finish just wore away, and then the planks started delaminating.
Now, Bruce makes a wide selection of flooring, and yours may hold up better, especially if it's low-traffic. But for someone looking to do an install, I would definately look at other vendors. From personal experience I know Anderson is good, even their lower-priced lines, but I'm sure there are others.
John
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On Sun, 15 Feb 2015 00:09:04 +0000 (UTC), John McCoy

Delaminating? How does wood delaminate? It's not laminated in the first place.

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On Sat, 14 Feb 2015 22:46:48 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Likely engineered hardwood. - or even more likely, Bruce Laminate - which is far from "hardwood" as you can get. Laminate is a picture of hardwood decoupaged onto some of the crappiest thick paperboard you can find.. There are a few companies that produce a durable laminate, but it will cost as much as real quality hardwood.

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snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote in

We're talking about engineered wood flooring here. That's a kind of plywood. Plywood delaminates when it's not made well.
John
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On 02/14/2015 05:09 PM, John McCoy wrote:

Any wood flooring will take a beating from an office chair with rollers unless a floor mat is used.

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On Sat, 14 Feb 2015 20:13:37 +0000 (UTC), John McCoy

If you buy the same glue at Home Dspot, Lowes, or your local "flooring store" it will be the same quality. Sometimes the flooring store has better stuff available, but that is also true of places like Lowes and Home Despot. If you buy the cheapest crap either place has, you get junk. If you buy the best either place has, you MAY be overpaying for your requirements, but it is still cheaper than having to do it over because you cheaped out.
I generally check around and don't buy either the cheapest or the most expensive.
My experience is buying the same quality, same brand product from the big box stores or from a real retailer (flooring shop, etc) there is not a big difference in price, and if you need advice, the advice you get from the "expert" is a lot better than what you get from the "borg"
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in news:umfvdallijfhnepvi04me54slqijranofm@ 4ax.com:

No, that is not true. In the case of glue for engineered wood floors, Home Depot or Lowes will have _one_ brand available, and it will be the lowest cost one.
The flooring store likely will give you a choice, and if they don't their one brand will be a better quality one.
John
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On Sun, 15 Feb 2015 00:13:06 +0000 (UTC), John McCoy

Lowes carries Bostik , Bruce, Tecsun, Mohawk, and USFloor. 3 1/2 or 4 gallon containers $160, $89, $190, $220, and $192 US prices repectively. I think the despot carries Roberts and Taylor - at least 2 different products from Taylor - MS+ and Tuff-Lok at $134 and $76 respectively, with the Roberts at about $95
Flooring experts are using the Bostik product, as well as Tecsun, Bruce, and Mohawk (depending on the brand of flooring they sell)
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in wrote: >>No, that is not true. In the case of glue for engineered wood

Are you looking on the website or in the store? My store carries Bruce. That's the only hardwood flooring adhesive they actually stock.
Now, they have a ton of choices on the website - but if you're going to special order it, you might as well go to a flooring store anyway.
John
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On Sun, 15 Feb 2015 17:08:22 +0000 (UTC), John McCoy

My stores, locally, don't stock the hardwood either, so if you are going to order the wood, you may as well order the adhesive as well. ANd if youy are ordering it, you may as well order the stuff recommended by the manufacturer. No?? If Bruce Hardwood says use Bruce adhesive - use it. Then they don't have a leg to stand on if something goes wrong. - or use Bostik - the "industry standard".
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in news:1392ea5m8ocne2gjprgv8c7d6gtd9nkoc9@ 4ax.com:

Well, that was sort of my point.

Good advice, I'd agree.

Well, I wouldn't dispute that either. I just wouldn't use Bruce period - as noted above, my experience is that it's a low quality product, and you can get better quality for a similar price from other manufacturers.
John
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On Mon, 16 Feb 2015 17:16:07 +0000 (UTC), John McCoy

Bruce makes the full gammit, from photo-finished dense cardboard to high quality solid hardwood - to cover the financial limitations of it's projected customer base, and to get it's products on the shelves of everything from flooring express to wallmart to Shangrla custom flooring and diamonds!!
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