Flooring

Page 1 of 2  
I have a natural wooden floor that is about 50 years old. They look like 1 inch thick pine planks but there are some 1/4 inch gaps between them. Any ideas on the best way to fill these as I am just about to sand the floor back to its natural colour from a dark stain and would like them filled first.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 30 Sep 2003 20:43:09 +0000 (UTC), "BTInternet"

When you sand the floors, don't blow or sweep out the dust between the planks. Apply the finish and everything will be copacetic.
Regards, Tom Thomas J. Watson-Cabinetmaker Gulph Mills, Pennsylvania http://users.snip.net/~tjwatson
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ask this old house had the same situation. They soaked rope in stain and pushed the rope in the gaps. It actually looked pretty good.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Any flooring people on this list?
A local TV channel ran a consumer segment of flooring citing recent Consumer Reports tests.
Winner was Bamboo.
Not only did it have better wear characteristics but also lower cost than Oak.
Anybody with first hand experience?
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The only experience I have with bamboo is this gardening freak next door planted huge amounts of it on hos property. Hundreds of bamboo plants of several species now occupy every square inch of his property.
Now I spend time almost every weekend cutting it down and trying to beat it back to the fence. It is insidious. It just takes over. Definitely an invasive species. It does not stay on his property. It wants to take over the neighborhood.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In

Lee, you must remember that bamboo is really grass. When it gets the chance it will spread out. If you get lucky he will have planted the "Giant" form and pretty soon you will have a fine Panda habitat.
LOL
P D Q
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Three words:
Two Four Dee
--
Kiva - Loans that change lives.
http://www.kiva.org/lender/david87375440
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Lee Michaels" wrote:

Should be able to get a couple of cane poles for fishing.
If he has a compost pile, you got worms.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Cut a trench!
The roots are shallow and won't go deep. Use a grass killer. It is a grass.
The shoots are used in Asian foods. But you don't have to eat it.
Good luck. I wanted the Giant bamboo - 4-8" in diameter but alas, I might not be able to control it.
Martin
Lee Michaels wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The stuff is insidious. People saying to use grass killer apparently have never tried to kill the stuff off. You'd have to make your property a Superfund cleanup site if you used enough chemicals to kill it. You basically have to scorch the earth, kill every living thing off - good plants and bad, good lifeforms and bad - and then hope it doesn't come back when you try to repopulate the parcel.
I'm in the northeast and the growing season is shorter than some places - I can't imagine what it would be like growing in a 4 season growing climate.
Someone mentioned digging a trench - that's how to start containing it. Then you have to install an impervious barrier about 18" to 24" deep. The runners will go down and around or even up and over a barrier, so it has to go deep, and the top of the barrier should be a couple of inches above grade so you can see if the runners are trying to clamber over the barrier. Like I said, the stuff is insidious.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RicodJour wrote:

...
Reminds me of an incident from years gone by... :)
The "scourge of the south" is, of course, kudzu (a Japanese import brought in during the 30s in an (ill-conceived) attempt to reclaim some of the worst of the old continuous cotton-planting erosion problems).
Anyway, while in E TN where it is a problem but not nearly as much as farther south since the winters do kill it back where we were, had a job for DOE in conjunction w/ another company. Their representative was from Pittsburgh and a _REAL_ pita to deal with both in and out of the office. One day as the the job was _finally_ coming to an end we, as good southern hosts, took this fella' and his visiting boss out to a nice lunch at a local eatery on the lake. He asked what that pretty ground cover was going down the banks to the lake saying he had an area in his back yard that needed something that would hold on a hill. We sent him home w/ enough plantings to bury the house in a couple of years...
If one day Pittsburgh is swallowed up by kudzu, you'll know "the rest of the story" :)
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"dpb" wrote

Good one. Nothing like pulling a fast one on somebody obnoxious.
Remind me to never piss you off.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dpb wrote:

My BIL lives in Knoxville and about 10 years ago we visited and that crap was covering everything. Visited again a month ago and hardly any was seen.
Their representative was from Pittsburgh and a _REAL_ pita to deal with both in and out of the

He must have been an import. Pittsburghers are all nice.
We

Saved the story in case we need to blame someone for another blob like attack.:-) I doubt Kudzu or Bamboo will grow around here however, winters are a bit too harsh for the little wusses .
--
Jack
Using FREE News Server: http://www.eternal-september.org /
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jack Stein wrote:

...
Go back end of August and down towards Loudan... :)
It winter kills so takes a little while in the spring/early summer to get its act together...w/ the rains this spring and early summer it'll be back out in full force when has a little hot weather...

...
LOL...
...
Always wondered whether any of it did survive or not. I'd guess if it once got established it could manage to hang on but wouldn't be nearly so invasive because warm seasons are so much shorter. It can get to 0F and below in K-town and it doesn't actually kill it entirely; simply freezes back. I don't know what it's overwinter limits actually are though...
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dpb wrote: ...

...
I didn't find any detailed horticultural works in a quick search but did find there's been a recent outbreak in Oregon along a roadside and reports it's as far north as "the northeast" in some other accounts.
W/ it's ability to root to 3-ft deep or more, I can imagine if it did get a start that while it would take longer in the spring for it to finally get going again it could manage to survive.
That was something we observed in TN; after very cold winters it would be later in the spring before it greened up--seems to come back from the roots where it freezes hard over winter. Kinda' like the wisteria; it may _look_ dead until late spring but when it finally pops you'll be digging out from under the rest of the summer until frost. :(
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dpb wrote:

The frost line in Pittsburgh is 3-ft. I doubt it gets down that far very often, but still, that stuff wouldn't likely make it through for long or it would already be here, considering you were nice enough to provide us with a sample:-) As far as the north is concerned, there is a fairly large difference in coastal north vs inland north. The ocean has a pretty good moderating effect I think.

I think we have wisteria, not sure, I'm no plant guy... Plenty of Oak, Maple, Cherry and Walnut however, and thats what its all about:-)
--
Jack
Using FREE News Server: http://www.eternal-september.org /
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The stuff is insidious. People saying to use grass killer apparently have never tried to kill the stuff off. You'd have to make your property a Superfund cleanup site if you used enough chemicals to kill it. You basically have to scorch the earth, kill every living thing off - good plants and bad, good lifeforms and bad - and then hope it doesn't come back when you try to repopulate the parcel.
I'm in the northeast and the growing season is shorter than some places - I can't imagine what it would be like growing in a 4 season growing climate.
Someone mentioned digging a trench - that's how to start containing it. Then you have to install an impervious barrier about 18" to 24" deep. The runners will go down and around or even up and over a barrier, so it has to go deep, and the top of the barrier should be a couple of inches above grade so you can see if the runners are trying to clamber over the barrier. Like I said, the stuff is insidious.
R -- doesn't the stuff die out after it blooms, and it all blooms at once? just wait for that to occur, or import a bunch of pandas on h1b visas.
maybe the zoo will take your cuttings.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In dropped this bit of wisdom:

Not too sure how it is over your way but ---
Oak is about $5-8 a square foot and Bamboo is about $3 in Canuckistan.
I have plans to do my hidey-hole in grass for about $400. I think the grass will last longer in my basement that oak would. With any luck I'll get back about 15% come tax-time.
Don't know about wear and tear yet, but it will have to go some to beat my oak floors. 12 years and still no discernable wear.
P D Q
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"PDQ" wrote:

Oak is about $5-8 a square foot and Bamboo is about $3 in Canuckistan.
Sounds about right for oak, based on the piece, bamboo was about $4-$5 SQF

You might want to look at it.

Had oak flooring in living room and dining room for the 25 years I lived in the place, but never saw it.
Wall to wall carpeting you know.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lew Hodgett wrote:

"Winner?" What were the tests? Compared to bamboo-looking laminate, laminate is:
* Cheaper * Won't dent * Wears better * Is impervious to UV rays * Virtually waterproof * Never needs "refinishing"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.