Floor leveling question

I have old oak flooring that's laid on a floor that's 3/4" off the level. I want to lift the oak off,level the sub floor & relay the oak. Anyone know of a product that I could pour & then nail thru to relay the floor?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Is the house or room 3/4" out because the foundation setttled? Is this 3/4" in 2 feet or in 40 feet? If it was settled foundation I might look at jacking up the house. How old is the house or building? Any new construction around the foundation? If it was out by that much over 40 feet I might not worry about it. There are concrete based flow leveling systems available but they would probably crack when you tried to nail through. http://www.edisoncoatings.com/html/Self_Leveling_Concrete_Floor_T/self_leveling_concrete_floor_t.htm
It may be a slow process to remove old oak flooring without destroying it. Maybe not as I have not tried to remove old oak flooring. It still goes back to the questions of how big the area is you are trying to level and why it is out of level.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The foundation has not settled. This is in the main hall about 4ft across & only at one end. As you approach the front door it becomes fine again, 12ft away. The joist in that area sagged, I tried jacking it,but didn't move it much. I was afraid of cracking the joist. So I supported it from underneath.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you are stating that one of the 14' long joists has sagged you could do a few things. If it is not load bearing you could cut it and sister in a new straight joist. Not the most fun task but if the goal is to get a dip out I bet it is less work that tearing up the old floor, leveling and trying to install a damaged old floor. All those nails get in the way of flipping a new joist in. I replaced a few joists at a friend's house after a fire. Termites had destroyed a few. Even after the house was gutted from drywall and cabinets flipping a new joist in was a pain. Actually we tore the old carboard joist out and replaced it. If you have seen a termite eaten board they leave nothing but air it seems.
So is this dip in the middle of the 4 foot hallway someplace or is it by a wall where a load was put on a joist where a double or triple joist should have been? Or was it just a joist that went a little wild as it dried out?
I did engineered joists on my first floor so my hardwood would have an even plane. So far after 10 years that system has worked out fine.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There are some "no shrink" grouts out there that I have used in the concrete trade. I've set 50 ton concrete walls on a 2" pad placed on a regular footing. As far as nailing the oak down, we had simular situations. We would drill a 1/4" inch hole and fill in with a 1/4" dowel, mark the hole and then place the wood and nail into the dowel. One trick is to keep the hole at a certain distance (off of the previuos piece) so you dont have to "hunt for it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.