Flat Pilot Hole Bits for Screws?

I found these in a jar in my Dad's garage. I don't know how old they are, possibly '60s vintage. Anyone seen them before?
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguarino/8603232217/in/photostream/lightbox/
They are marked with the screw gage and length, and are tapered for the threads, shank and countersink, and some even provide for an extended hole, presumably to accommodate a plug. One is shown with what must be a removable stop.
I don't know how well these would work in hardwoods, but I used one to make the pilot holes to attach the back panels to my (plywood) bookcases. The screws fit perfectly. On a side note, the screws were "found" items as well; they were in the house when we bought it. Score one for frugality, even if I did have to drive them by hand, with a slot screwdriver.
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On Sun, 31 Mar 2013 04:02:51 -0700 (PDT), Greg Guarino

I've seen and used similar bits before. A long time before. They were the forerunner to what I use now.
http://www.leevalley.com/en/Wood/page.aspx?p2309&cat=1,180,42240
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Those are really nice looking.
I've used the flat ones before, you can see how to make your own - just a bit of work.
The drill wasn't plunged in - it is slowly moved in. It doesn't draw out the wood it cuts by a tear/cut.
I have second gen version - each with a stop and the drills are C shaped not flat.
Now fast up-twist pointed / cone drills.
Martin
On 3/31/2013 7:23 AM, Dave wrote:

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Absolutely ... old style countersink pilot hole bits, used with a brace, all you used to see when I was a kid. They were easy to make, as many well equipped shops had, in the days when a trip to a hardware store may take days instead of minutes, an ancillary, coal fired forge (along with a large measure of necessary self reliance).
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I had an electric drill motor (hand drill now) I bought in 1952. It was 1/4" chuck and very fast. It was a universal motor (AC or DC) and was noisy. It finally lost the bearing (bushing) and I replaced it 10 years ago or so.
It was very fast and had a 4" saw blade and a stand for it. It was great drilling small holes and the flat drills worked nicely.
Replaced it with a nice hammer drill - 1/2" chuck - hand model with cord. Batteries don't last through the summer or the winter here in Texas.
Martin
On 3/31/2013 8:32 AM, Swingman wrote:

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On 3/31/2013 9:32 AM, Swingman wrote:

With a brace, really? I remember my Dad (and my grandfather) having bit braces and a hand-crank style drill as well. I think I used them a few times, even though my Dad had power drills as far back as I can remember. But I always associated bit braces with auger bits. I'm surprised that flat bits would work well at such a slow speed.

I imagine that the difficult part would be to get the two sides of the bit to be good mirror-images and symmetrical about the center line.
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On 3/31/2013 7:02 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Those were I think Black and Decker bits. Sears also made a set. They were great for single shot countersinking. I didn't remember the hex shaft that I see on yours. They look in good shape. To keep them sharp you just put them on a stone and a few strokes they are sharp again.
Like a normal spade bit, they work better on softwoods. Careful if you use them on maple ... you may twist them from heat build up.
--
Jeff

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On 3/31/2013 9:47 AM, woodchucker wrote:

They worked nicely on the plywood, but I could tell that the bit wasn't exactly slicing through like it was butter. I suspected the warning about harder woods. I used the bit as much out of curiosity as anything else, and the screws I used were just about perfectly suited to the bit, and the task. Moreover, both were free. But for the slot heads, the whole process was a pleasure.
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Greg Guarino wrote:

I have a sears set of these. The stop had three notches so you could set the depth of the countersink. They worked well, but I have gradually changed to the new Sears set which has a regular drill bit with a countersink that holds the bit. I seldom use "wood" screws anymore so don't need the stepped taper.
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On 3/31/2013 5:02 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

I have a set of those...somewhere. ;-) IIRC they came from Sears.
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On Sunday, March 31, 2013 5:02:51 AM UTC-6, Greg Guarino wrote:

possibly '60s vintage. Anyone seen them before? http://www.flickr.com/phot os/gdguarino/8603232217/in/photostream/lightbox/
Possibly from the 1950s, as well.
If I may, I'll take the liberty to expand on this thread, a bit, since we a re on a little "field trip", back in time.
About 2-3 yrs ago, I inherited a 1950s shop, which was used into the 1980s. All the major tools, Craftsman 10" contractor saw, Craftsman 8" benchtop table saw, a Craftsman and a Rockwell shaper dates to the mid 1950s and the Rockwell benchtop drill press is a 1949 model. Lots of hand tools, planes , vises, Rockwell router, B&D circular saw, etc., etc.
Long ago, I had posted pics of some of these items. Here are a few pics of similar bits, as you have, that came from the inherited shop. There are m ore similar bits stashed in my old shop, but I didn't go dig for them, for pictures, here. These particular bits were in the drill press cabinet, alo ng with many drill bits, sanding adapters, mortise attachments, etc. http://www.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N04/
In the past, some of you have commented on other old shop accessories. I t hought to include pics of the custom made storage cabinet and the "Rolodex" storage turnstyles, that came with the inherited shop. Lately, I've been cleaning and sharpening some of these tools.
I don't know that I'll use all of these old tools, but I do use some of the m. When I have time, I clean them, sharpen them, get them in working order and plan to just display most of them.
When the prospect arises, I also use them to teach my nephews and their kid s their use and/or the same or similar use, as compared to today's newer to ols (at least the relatively newer tools I have), i.e., side by side compar isons, the safety improvements, use improvements, etc., when applicable. E xample: Even if they would never use a draw knife, by showing them how to u se one, and letting them give it a try, allows them the knowledge of the ol der tool and ways of doing things, a visit back in time.... and we have a g ood time visiting, too.
Sonny
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On 3/31/2013 11:55 AM, Sonny wrote:

Cool stuff. Spade bit heads that "plug in" to an extension shaft? I've never seen that before, and I wonder if that was such a good idea. I could see the thing vibrating off deep inside a hole.
I found a drill bit in the remnants of a plumber's shop; the biggest bit I've ever seen. It was an auger style, probably 2" in diameter and 18" long. I imagine it was used for installing water and heating pipes. I shudder to think what kind of drill (or if hand-turned, what size human being) drove this beast.
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On 4/2/2013 1:38 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

We carried one on a FD ladder truck (many years ago). We could cut a hole in a floor above a basement and stick a nozzle in it. :-)
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On 4/2/2013 12:38 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Google up "Hole Hog" for the drill used by the construction crowd.
Here is the "modern" version:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
The older models didn't spare the amps and would/could break your arm when not used in a fairly safe method.
There was a famous story here on the rec about the Hole Hog and what could happen. I suspect the story is long lost in history and google.
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On Sun, 31 Mar 2013 04:02:51 -0700, Greg Guarino wrote:

lightbox/

Good ol' Sears & Roebuck. I've still got mine. The notches in the shanks are to set the depth stop. I think I got mine in the '70s but they've been around longer than that.
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"Greg Guarino" wrote in message
I found these in a jar in my Dad's garage. I don't know how old they are, possibly '60s vintage. Anyone seen them before?
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguarino/8603232217/in/photostream/lightbox/
They are marked with the screw gage and length, and are tapered for the threads, shank and countersink, and some even provide for an extended hole, presumably to accommodate a plug. One is shown with what must be a removable stop.
I don't know how well these would work in hardwoods, but I used one to make the pilot holes to attach the back panels to my (plywood) bookcases. The screws fit perfectly. On a side note, the screws were "found" items as well; they were in the house when we bought it. Score one for frugality, even if I did have to drive them by hand, with a slot screwdriver.
Those are great. Have adjustable stop for setting depth for head or a button plug or just a flush plug. Wish they were still made. I have used them for years. HOWEVER , The first part will break if used in hardwood. How well I know. Would buy more if still available. WW
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"WW" wrote in message
I found these in a jar in my Dad's garage. I don't know how old they are, possibly '60s vintage. Anyone seen them before?
I have a set similar to that that dates back to the early 70's. I used them for years in soft woods. They worked pretty well but dulled fairly quickly. When I noticed that they were running hot or not cutting very well I'd touch them up with a file (pretty soft metal) and get them going again. Eventually I was able to afford a set of the Fuller taper-point drills and countersinks, and put the flat bits on the shelf. I hardly ever throw a tool away, so they're still there and I take a nostalgic look at them once in a while when I happen to notice them.
Tom
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Got a bunch next to my drillpress. Use them once in a while in restoration work using slotted screws.
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Greg Guarino wrote:

Yeah. They are from the 60s. IIRC, Sears used to sell them. The light slots on the shank are preset marks for a spring loaded stop. It did not hold well.
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dadiOH
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