Fixing a lacquered pine desktop prior to prime and paint


I have a 1-1/4" thick 30" x 64" pine desk finished in clear lacquer. Its writing surface is beat up. I'm going to paint it with Behr Red Bark (4c18-1) hi-gloss paint, after I sand, patch and prime it, to match room casing and other furniture I'll paint. I am not considering a clear finish.
A large part of the damage has mostly not broken through the clear surface finish. But these dents are numerous and lengthy. Like a kid skateboarded on marbles. There are some other smallish chips, burns, and dents. I would have to belt sand or power plane too much. . I do not want to undercut all of these with a chisel or get out the Dremel. In that case I'd rather live with the indentations under the paint. They are concave like a marble impression. I'd be fine scuffing them up, but not getting any undercut. That would be creating damage and going in the other direction.
I have read about sanding sealers, paste fillers, etc. I've read about the thick bar top stuff - not here. Nothing is pointing me in the right direction. I've got an old embossed filler stick from Lee Valley. Works great in the microwave. I just use slivers in a small jam jar (~1oz.). Then slice off with blade. I've got filler crayons - too soft. I've got a couple plastic wood in a small can. I've got an old Lee Valley filler/stuff in a tube you kneed and warm with water. I have auto body filler - the two part polyester and styrene resin and hardener stuff. I also have another autobody tube: auto body glazing and spot putty (no mixing). I have Minwax Helmsman i/o spar urethane. I've got a bag o bug bits. I've got Duratite surfacing putty. It also says its plastic, and to only use Duratite solvent if becomes dry, which I don't have. The original can says contains volatile naphtha and acetone. Haven't found out what to use to thin it yet.
When you put your eye down you see depth and too much sanding. Just paint will show these until 12th layer. Some products seem like the right thing at a given time, but not specific for my needs now. I don't care about repetition or the time I'll spend going over and over it again and again with any lacquer or polyurethane-like product, sanding in between coats.
So I don't know what to do. And/or buy. If it were drywall I would know what to do. I'm good at that. I'm hoping I can use one of the autobody products like I would polyfilla. Another suspicion is sanding sealer - I think it may be in the right direction, under primer and paint, though this is a clear product!? Any thoughts
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Seeing as how you are going to paint it, use the Bondo, apply as smooth as you can and sand flat, do it several times if necc. Also after the first coat of paint you may see some spots you miised just mix up some more & bondo & sand as much as you want to
Good Luck, George

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I am exceptional w/ polyfilla. I am only painting this pine desk b/c it will match a lot (everything) else when I'm done, begining w/ splayed legs of a $2K blk. leather chair/ottoman. If I were to worry about little bits chipping through the paint in the long run w/r/t using bondo, how would I prevent this from happening? With polyfill, it will stick to anything, and you can add a mirometer if you need it. I would not like worm hole-like tracks of bondo popping up. When I mentioned dulling the edges I am just thinking about finger pressure through the sandpaper in order to get into the concave grooves. I'd need to folow each line carefully. I was told I need not sand through to bare wood in order to paintover the clear lacquer. What is the adhesiveness and how should I prepare these grooves, specks to achieve a cohesive base.
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bent wrote:

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Hi, I have had good lick with rock-hard, mainly be sure to prime that laquer so what ever you use will adhere to it as for the duratite I fouind you something on that hope it helps
Notebook, 1993- MATERIALS & METHODS - Painting - Oil Painting - Binders and Diluents - Water-thinned Adhesives - Synthetic Resins
Characteristics - Painting Methods & Techniques - Materials and Equipment - Work Space & Storage - Manufacture of Pigments - Protection of the Picture
From: Kay, Reed. The Painter's Guide to Studio Methods and Materials. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1983.
Synthetic Resins - Polyvinyl Acetate (PVA)
Polyvinyl Acetate (PVA) is a synthetic resin. When it is prepared as an emulsion, it serves as the principal ingredient of many milky white glues sold under such names as Elmer's Glue-All (Borden Chemical Co.) and Duratite White Glue (D. A. P., Inc.). These products are widely used in the industrial trades as adhesives for wood, paper, and other materials. They are liquid at room temperature and do not require heating in a glue pot. The glue may be thinned with water, and it forms films that are flexible, clear, and water resistant. It is neither toxic nor flammable. Especially pure grades of these polyvinyl acetate emulsions are manufactured under such names as Everflex (W. R. Grace & Co.) BG or Polyco (Bordon Chemical Co.) 2113 or 2151. For more than thirty years artists have been using polyvinyl acetate emulsions as binders for paint and gesso (page 201). In addition these emulsions have been employed as adhesives to attach paper, textiles, or other materials to a support surface. [pp. 37-38]
[Kay, Reed. The Painter's Guide to Studio Methods and Materials. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1983.]
blugenes
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bent wrote:

You may be able to steam them out. Or at least raise them so they need less filling/sanding. To do so, remove the finish locally (lacquer thinner), dampen the wood slightly, put a clean damp cloth over and a hot iron on top. When the steam stops, take a look. If raised, stop; if not, try repeating. _______________

Forget those ____________

Good for deep dings. Be careful sanding it though - it will be harder than the pine and you don't want to sand away surrounding wood while sanding the filler level. _______________

Good stuff, very useful for areas such as your smallish chips. Basically, it is the same as the auto body filler but is talc and lacquer rather than talc and resin. Since the lacquer evaporates you may have to overfill slightly or apply another layer. No big deal, it sands wonderfully.
-- dadiOH ____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.06... ...a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
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This is not a project where I can tackle it in parts. I need a macro solution to a micro problem. Any prep (non-filling) other than stripping or roughing up will likely be a step in the wrong direction.
I don't know how to repair a surface like this after I used lacquer thinner to remove the finish and allow access to the pores.
BTW Could I not get a kettle boiling and drip it over the indentationsother than using an iron?
But having cleared an area with lacquer thinner, the only way I would think of to get back to an even finish would be to sand. Then I'd have a big cup. Are you suggesting any step, besides sanding, between stripping w/ lacquer thinner, raising the grain and filling? If raising the dents I'm worried about what I'd be left with after pouring LT, scraping and sanding.
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bent wrote:

I didn't suggest you strip the whole thing, just local areas if you wanted to try steaming out the dents. To "repair" afterward you would spot prime before painting. _______________

Boiling water has less heat than steam. _______________

You mean a depression from sanding? Only if you used a belt or disc sander with really coarse paper and let the thing sit on the wood.

First off, I wouldn't pour lacquer thinner...I'd put some on a swab and use that to remove the lacquer just over the dent. As I said above, any bare wood should be primed before painting.
-- dadiOH ____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.06... ...a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
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