First time watching David Marks

Page 3 of 3  

message

ass
projects
he
One of the things you have to understand is that a DIY show has a very small fraction of the budget that NYW has, and they do more shows than per season. So as a result, they are knocking out shows pretty quick. As for the sleeves, that's DIY. The smirk is probably the joke he can't tell becuase DIY is pretty restrictive on following the script. Do you see a pattern developing here? He does use hearing protection on the show, but I don't remember exactly what product. IIRC, it was some sort of ear plug. He knows a guy with a bigger jointer than his. He's a lot smoother in person than on the show.
Cheers, Eric
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
He was at the local woodworking show here in So.Cal in January. You always get a different perspective in person, almost like a second first impression. My second first impression was, he looks a lot older in person. Regardless, he was a nice guy, answering questions about the project from the show that he had on hand (the curved top chest), and the smile was pretty much what you see on the tube.
The smirk always seemed to me to be "how the heck did I ever make it to cable TV?"
-- ******** Bill Pounds http://www.billpounds.com

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I too was at the show in Ontario, CA., and met David. I spent almost a half hour just talking about woodworking and different finishing techniques. I was very impressed with his humility and general friendliness. He is very open about his processes, trials and errors. He is no carpenter turned woodworker, he truly is an artist that creates in wood. I could tell he really loves creating.
Dave

----== Posted via Newsfeed.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==---- http://www.newsfeed.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups ---= 19 East/West-Coast Specialized Servers - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
And just exactly what is wrong with being a carpenter turned woodworker?

half
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nothing. I was just illustrating the difference as I see it. I occasionally watch Norm but after that show where he made a poorly designed, poorly executed, not well thought out melamine laundry fiasco, I lost a little respect for him. JMO Dave

I
very
----== Posted via Newsfeed.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==---- http://www.newsfeed.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups ---= 19 East/West-Coast Specialized Servers - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yeah, TC. I thought the normal progression was from newbie to intermediocre, carpenter, finish carpenter, woodworker, then finally artiste.
brought forth from the murky depths:

.-. Life is short. Eat dessert first! --- http://diversify.com Comprehensive Website Development
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What's the breakdown?
Is it:
!) carpenter of non-wood 2)carpenter 3)woodworker 4)fine woodworker 5)artist woodworker 6)artist who happens to use wood

I haven't seen the show, but I sure wish I could. Thanks to whoever posted the url. I didn't see a single thing in his that I would want to make, but lots of them get you thinking.
Kind of ironic that he is talking about covering the sacred wood.
"The patina finish that is a trademark of my work, is a hybrid I've developed over the last decade. It combines painting, gilding (metal leafing), chemical patinas, and lacquering techniques. The complex layers result in something that gives the appearance of a faux, ancient, petrified stone quality."
I thought that kind of thing would have made him Un-Wreck-PC.
If you like that kind of stuff, you'd enjoy going to most any better college fine arts show that has woodworking as part of their fine arts program. Because they have so much time, some nice equipment and the fire of youth, they make some wild and complex projects.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Interestingly, one of the simplest pieces he's made was a pure art piece, and sold for more than anything else. It's the one that comes up at www.djmarks.com. I think he said he got $20,000 for that one. His wife suggested he do more art pieces. ;-^
Cheers, Eric
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Just goes to show the size of the jointer ain't what makes an artist. Which one is it?
What's his wife like?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

piece,
Didn't meet his wife. He related the story during his presentation. The piece is the one that is a round disk with a vertical diamond (with round sides, don't know what the shape would normally be called) through it. It's the one that comes up when you first enter his site at the above address.
Cheers, Eric
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Larry Bud) wrote in

Love his show, he does great work. Smile irks me, but the 'helmet head' haircut down right frightens me! Seems like a good guy who enjoys smoking a bud or two before shotting the show.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've attributed that "smirk" to him being ill at ease on TV. Nothing more. He had an episode on selecting and buying wood, in it he met with a couple of fellows and all of them seemed very uncomfortable in front of the camera, resulting in more than a few good unintentional comedy moments. BUT, the episode was excellent, I learned a great deal. I love the show, got TiVo set up to snag every episode. It records 4 or 5 a week.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I wish he would also show building of some of the templates he uses. If you start with a pre-made template then the lesson of doing the real thing is lost.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In rec.woodworking snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Ocky) wrote:

The show about making the bent lamination jarra lamp, he goes into great detail about the template and bend mould.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 29 Feb 2004 16:11:32 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Ocky) brought forth from the murky depths:

Say you want to build a round oak blurfl by the thousands.
To make a blurfl, you need a drawing for the legs, the skirt, and the top.
To make the template for the top, use the drawing to lay out lines on a piece of MDF or baltic birch plywood. Cut just outside the lines and sand to smooth right down to the line.
To make an actual top, set the template on the piece of wood you want to cut, mark a line around the template, and cut to outside of the line. Use double-sided tape to stick the template to the wood and use the template as a bearing guide for the router. Rout around the piece and remove the template.
Tip: In most cases, the template is simply a piece cut to the exact same size and shape as the intended piece.
.-. Better Living Through Denial --- http://www.diversify.com Wondrous Website Design
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.