First time using tung oil

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So I am going to try this on a piece of walnut. On the bottle it says to dilute 50/50 with mineral spirits. I have paint thinner, and denatured alcohol. Will either of these be ok to use, or do I need to get some mineral spirits? Thanks.
--
Paul


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On 11/2/2011 2:37 PM, Paul wrote:

Paint thinner is mineral spirits, mineral spirits is not paint thinner.
Paint thinner is mineral spirits with an ingredient to slow evaporation.
If you use paint thinner cure time might be exceptionally long.
If you deviate from the instructions, do not experiment on your project, experiment on scraps.
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Ok, thanks. I will get some mineral spirits.
Paul
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Also, allow twice as long to dry as indicated on the can if you plan to put any finish over the oil. I learned this the hard way more than once. Undried oil under your finish causes a whole long list of undesirable and unpredictable issues.
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On 11/2/2011 3:42 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

Agree with you here but I wonder if you shellac it first....
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No, I rarely use a seal coat of any kind. They only thing I would put on raw wood before oil is dye.
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On 11/2/2011 6:21 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

What kind/brand dye are you using. I for the first time ever used a General Finishes die stain and I am pretty impressed with the speed of application. Not to mention the penetration I am getting compared to a regular oil stain.
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I use Transtint premixed concentrated dyes. They are liquid and you mix it with water or alcohol, I use water now after experimenting with both. Some tricks to learn but great stuff. They come in lots of colors and easy to mix to get any color you want.
- Alcohol dries way to fast and you end up with lap marks that are hard to wash away. - Wet and sand, wet and sand to raise and kill grain nibs. - Get project damp first to slow absorbition which gives you better control - Build up to darkness you want or wash out areas with fresh water if too dark - Don't be afraid of water - Watch seams, molding, corners and joints because the water wicks in then wicks back out later and you end up with too much dye in corners etc so keep wiping for 20 minutes or so. - There is a great video somewhere on FWW where a guy is doing sunburst colors on an electric guitar and he shows how to wash in and out the color. - Dyes look very ugly when dry and don't become beautiful until oiled and especially when you hit them with shellac, lacquer, varnish or poly.
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On 11/3/2011 12:58 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

Thamks for the tips.
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Transtint / Transfast dyes will stain maple jet black in very few coats. You'll never go back to Minwax.
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On 11/3/2011 3:01 PM, Father Haskell wrote:

Never go back to Minwax. Now that was funny, I don't care who you are. I would never by choice use Minwax stains or varnishes.
I did try General Finishes Dye Stain for the first time on my current Large project and I am pretty impressed. In this particular case I like the fact that the day does in fact stain rather than paint on a translucent finish like their gel stains.
I was a Lawrence McFadden and Bartley's gel stain and gel varnish loyal user until both became unavaliable. Now I have to find a new main stay, Althought Good Stuff varnish is a lot like the Lawrence McFadden gel varnish.
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wrote:

+1
The Hindenburg, The Titanic, The Clintons, Packard Hell, Minwhacked, WaterSeal, Maytag, Yugo, Fiat, Obama. (Great F-Ups in History)

If a person is frugal, go buy dyes at W.D. Lockwood in NYC. They're inexpensive, if you must use dye (or stain.) http://www.wdlockwood.com (Prices tripled since I last looked) http://goo.gl/SaSLI How to use.
-- The unexamined life is not worth living. --Socrates
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Whoa there, my friend. I bought a 1973 Fiat Spyder new, loved it, still have it, it was our only car until an idiot pulled out into the highway and stopped.
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dadiOH
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wrote:

...then you won't get the pop from the oil.
I get superb results with Waterlox Satin, which is primarily a tung oil finish with a phenolic component and some metal driers. It's -weeks- faster than straight tung oil if you're trying to build a handrubbed finish.
-- Knowledge speaks, but wisdom listens. -- Jimi Hendrix
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wrote:

I'll second the Waterlox plug. Excellent stuff. JP
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"SonomaProducts.com" wrote:

once. Undried oil under your finish causes a whole long list of undesirable and unpredictable issues. -------------------------------------- Tung oil contains no driers.
Boiled linseed oil is tung oil that contains driers.
Tung oil takes forever to dry.
BLO dries in a day or two.
I don't use straight tung oil for the above reasons.
YMMV
Lew
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When did they figure out how to make flax grow on a tree?

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Yeah I usually use BLO thinned with Mineral Spirits or Turpentine. Linseed oil is from flax but Tung is from some Chinese nuts. Ok insert joke here about tungs and nuts, and BLO, etc.
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On 11/2/2011 7:21 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

No, it's not. Linseed oil comes from flax seeds; tung oil comes from the nuts of the tung tree.
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Can't say for certain what you get on the west coast, but here in the eastern USA, BLO is still linseed oil with driers, not tung oil of any kind...
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