First Plane?

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OK Folks, they say confession is good for the soul. So I decided to come clean.
I don't own a plane. There, I said it. But I don't feel much better.
All this time I've been masquerading as a fairly accomplished woodworker (to my lay friends anyway) and I don't even own a plane. Oh I have lots of nice machines. Thickness planer, yes, power plane too, but not one honest neander plane.
Being self-taught instead of instructed, I have just blundered along, somehow managing to turn out some stuff that I wasn't ashamed of by making do with what I had.
I have decided that the woodworking gods must be appeased and they won't let my skills progress any farther until I have made the sacrifice and purchased a plane, and learned to tune and use it.
Question is, what should I buy, seeing as how I'm still a virgin (plane-wise). I'd rather not buy something from the BORG that I'll outgrow in a year. I don't yet have the skills to really appreciate a fine piece of equipment, but I'm willing to fork over the dough and grow into it. I just don't want to blunder into some specialty item that's not versitile enough.
OK, enough grovelling, what say you?
DonkeyHody "Every man is my superior in that I can learn from him."
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"DonkeyHody" wrote in message

Really depends upon what you do in the wooddorking realm. I don't own many, but the most useful for what I do (lots of drawer fitting/tweaking where joints were supposed to meet, etc.) is a Veritas 'Low Angle Block Plane'.
Depending upon your age, basically the same that could be said about the females in your life ... tis' a thing of great beauty, and a joy to hold.
You might want to check out Steve Knight's site also, and get his advice based on your anticipated usage.
--
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Last update: 12/13/05
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Swingman wrote:

some furniture item. Fitting and tweaking are the uses I forsee now. I don't envision myself going neander and using a hand plane instead of my planer or jointer, or anything like that.
DonkeyHody
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DonkeyHody wrote:

In that case a (good) block plane would work.
er
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(snip) I don't envision myself going neander and using a hand plane instead of

After using a few good hand planes, you may be swayed a little more towards neanderism . There are some things that are far easier to do with a hand plane. I'd recommend a shoulder plane to start, it'll trim those tenons to perfection. A low angle block plane is also a good uggestion. --dave

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On Wed, 14 Dec 2005 13:38:16 -0800, with neither quill nor qualm,

An old Stanley #60-1/2 would do him right. Don, goto http://supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan9.htm fo mo info. Add a Ron Hock iron for even more fun.
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STOP LIVING LIKE VEAL
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The Borg has a Buck brand plane that looks similar to a #5 Stanley. Or if you would prefer something smaller, a #220 Stanley block plane was my first plane when I was 11 or 12. They're cheap, but they have precise adjustment of the cutting iron depth. Should be in the $20 to $25 range. The block planes can be used with one hand if you don't try to cut too deep.
Otherwise, a USED cessna 4 seat can be had for about the same $ as a new P-up truck.
Tom in KY, *-bay is a good place to look around and see what has been available all of this time that you have been planeless.
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snipped-for-privacy@bellsouth.net wrote:

I bought that plane and had a negative plane aversion for long after. It was bowed in the middle of the sole raising the mouth high above the work and, as a consequence, I could only take too much or not enough material from the workpiece. I didn't know enough about planes to correct that, of course.
er
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Also,
I forgot to mention that whether you're a neander or a normite you *need* a block plane.
Layne
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With all due respect...DO NOT buy Buck Bros., Great Neck, Craftsman, or other economy hand plane...even new Stanleys. You're much better off getting a good used Stanley ('60s & earlier are good), Millers Falls, Sargent or Lakeside plane.
FTW, I bought a newer Stanley #4 with plastic handles and no matter how much I've tuned it I can't get it to cut tissue thin shavings. On the other hand I also bought an older Stanley #6 and with NO tune up other than honing the blade on waterstones I am able to make tissue thin shavings with it...thin, like one ply of a double ply Kleenex.
Layne
On 14 Dec 2005 11:03:27 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@bellsouth.net wrote:

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"DonkeyHody"

Knight-Toolworks http://www.knight-toolworks.com affordable handmade wooden planes
You won't be disappointed. Dave
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DonkeyHody wrote:

I'm sure there will be lots of opinions on this, but the one plane I'd like to have would be something equivalent to a Stanley 112 scraper plane. Knowing how much fun most people have with finishing, being able to get the surface smoother faster is a great advantage. So if any of you have a Stanley 112 (or even a 212) or a LV version that you don't want I'll be glad to send you my address and I'll even pay the shipping. Just send it on over.
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DonkeyHody wrote:

Pull planes Taiwanese style -- and get their brass hammer.. http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=46322&cat=1,41182,41186
These are inexpensive for a set of four and very good. I find them very fast to adjust -- after some practice.
See Lee Valley Planes here... http://www.leevalley.com/wood/Search.aspx?c=2&action=n
Many styles. I have tried most and they are all nice.
Note that you can get all the Taiwanese planes for the price of one metal plane. I have used the planes on all my precision projects and am very pleased.
We also have the contour planes, the micro planes and a Stanley smoother, a block plane etc. The metal push-style planes mostly gather dust now. They do still get used occasionally.
Even a push style plane takes lots of practice... The pull planes take a bit less. They are _not_ for "hogging off" wood.
You can just search for plane and see all the stuff. Their metal planes are superb... http://www.leevalley.com/wood/Search.aspx?c=2&action=a&ap=1#start
I want the "router" plane for inlay, and a plane for M&T work. Metal or wood. Send a donation. :-)
-- Will R. Jewel Boxes and Wood Art http://woodwork.pmccl.com The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it. George Bernard Shaw
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LV low-angle block plane. It's the best all-round wood trimming device since the knife. You can even bypass two grades of sandpaper by running it on the surface of a board.
Could you get by with a Record or Stanley? Perhaps, but the LV is as close to a sure thing as you can get, and the others are risky at more than half the price..
Then, depending on your particular type of work, you get what you need. Smooth, of course is great for flat work, but the turner wants a scrub, and the guy with a mortising machine needs a shoulder or rabbet block....
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I highly recommend a Knight Toolworks Plane. Like others have indicated Steve can assist with the type you should use. I have 3 of his and use the Smoother a lot. I do not have a problem with burning wood when ripping but every once in a while there are times when you have a piece of lumber that burns when you rip it. The smoother cleans that burn up with little effort and quickly. Drawer sides a smidge too tall? Use the smoother to tweak it.
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My first plane was a Stanley shoulder plane. I had a specific need for it, but it is used much less than my Lee Valley low angle block plane.
Doing it over, I'd much rather have a Lee Valley shoulder plane than the Stanley. It took a lot of work to tune and sharpen the Stanley, the LV was good to go right out of the box. Ed
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DonkeyHody wrote:

You don't (IMHO) grow out of planes from the Borg... you grow in to them as you learn to compensate for their bogosity.
Get a jack plane... it's a jack-of-all-trades kinda thing.
er
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DonkeyHody wrote:

ended up buying a LV low angle smoother. The cool thing about a bevel up plane is that you can transform them from low angle to York pitch (50 degree) by swapping out the blade. Fit, finish, durability, usability of the LV planes (Veritas brand) is superb. You'll never regret buying any Veritas plane. From that beginning, I got a medium shoulder plane, a scraper plane (use it a LOT), then a large shoulder plane and low angle block plane. Just got a 22" jointer. That's a remarkable tool to joint an edge or flatten a surface. I don't know how I got along so long without it. Santa will probably bring me a std. block plane and a bevel up jack plane (with the extra high angle blade ).
I used to wonder why guys had planes numbering in the dozens. Now I know why! Seriously, a block plane or a bevel up plane around 9-12 inches would be a good start. When you get tear out, pop in a high angle blade (you can only do that in a bevel up plane to make the effective angle change).
Dave
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Have to disagree somewhat with this point. In a bailey or other bevel-down style plane, all you need is a slight back bevel on the iron to accomplish the same thing.
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Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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DonkeyHody (in snipped-for-privacy@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com) said:
| Question is, what should I buy, seeing as how I'm still a virgin | (plane-wise). I'd rather not buy something from the BORG that I'll | outgrow in a year. I don't yet have the skills to really | appreciate a fine piece of equipment, but I'm willing to fork over | the dough and grow into it. I just don't want to blunder into some | specialty item that's not versitile enough.
I'd suggest a low-angle block plane. If you can afford two, get the LV low-angle smoothing plane, too. I've got about a dozen planes and these are the two most used.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
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