First Nailer?

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I'll step up and admit that I have 2 extremely inexpensive 18 gauge brad drivers from HF... the 1st one worked so well, I went and got another one when they went on sale.. nice to have different size brads ready for things like drawers, where I'm using 1 1/4 brads on the sides but that would be over kill on the bottoms.. so the other gun has 1/2" in it..
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On Sun, 05 Dec 2004 19:11:29 +0000, Andy Dingley

only ONE???
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wrote:

Now don't be silly !
I think there's about 50 hammers or mallets in the workshop. Admittedly most of those are for sheetmetalworking, which uses _lots_ of different hammers.
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I've had a PC BN200 for several years now. I plan to augment it one day with a couple of sizes larger and a size smaller (15 ga finish nails and pins plus a round head nailer). I have no complaints about the 18ga x 2 inch nailer. For my use, it's been the best compromise first nialer. Good for applying molding, tacking things in place while glue dries, slapping together storage boxes and drawers. From your description of your near term projects, I'd think this model or equivalent would serve you well.
bob g.
FMB wrote:

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I find air nailers to be GREAT for finish carpentry. Never again a half moon on the molding! For that, you'll need a 15 ga. finish nailer, angled tips are best. For quickly assembling jigs, backs on cabinets, etc... An 18 ga. brad nailer is good.
I don't usually use nails in fine furniture, and there isn't a reason to in typical kitchen or bathroom cabinetry.
I have a Senco 15 ga., and Porter Cable 16 and 18 ga. nailers. The 16 is kind of an orphan, it came in a kit with a compressor and the 18 ga. brad nailer.
Barry
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Go for an 18ga Brad nailer. Make sure you get one that shots from 5/8-2" or 2"+. Some lower cost options only do 3/4" or only go up to 1 1/4".
I've found the 5/8" to be important. You may end up wioth applications such as lapping to pieces of 3/4" stoc with rabbits or dados, etc and only have 3/4 total material to join and the 5/8" is cool.
At the upper end 1 1/4" should be OK because you might be shooting through 3/4and that alows you to shoot into another piece of 3/4" without shooting through. However, I often find I have some lap situation where I have 1/4" ply over 3/4" stocck and want to shoot al the way through both and 1 1/4" won't do it. Also toe nailing or shootoing up through crown molding can require more than 1 1/4" also.
The PC is probably the most common but I've personnaly had some problems with them. Senco is much quieter and "I think" does a better job. Recently one of the wood mags reviewed about 20 different models and Paslode was the one that impressed me the most. I'd buy either Senco or Paslode (if you can find it).
Keep in mind, brad nailers are typically used in conjunction with gluing applications. If you are looking to do nailing only type applications, then I would go up to a 15ga finish nailer.

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I have a 15 ga finish nailer, 18 ga brad nailer, 23 ga pin nailer, and a narrow ga crown stapler and love them all.
My advice is to start w/ the 18 ga brad nailer. It is most flexible, i.e. can do the most jobs.
Actually, my favorite is the 23 ga pin nailer. I love tacking moulding on furniture while the glue dries. The pins are invisible.
Most important rule: keep your non-trigger hand at least one fastener length away from the action, otherwise *bad* things can happen.
Rex
FMB wrote:

shop (aka

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A good "rule of thumb..."
Sorry....
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