First career, last career

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My first career was playing my violin with the El Paso Symphony.
I would like my last career to be *making* violins. I have only the rudiments of a shop, and some hand tools.
So, what could I do to move incrementally toward my goal of making wooden acoustic musical instruments? I have a budget of maybe $1000 per year.
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Several places on the net have violin's in kit form along with directions of course on the tools needed and proper construction. If I where you I would start this way. That is of course if there was no Luthier around to get to know for help. Puff

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seek out the best luthier in your area. make friends, help out when you can and learn as much as you can.
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Well, you already have one HUGE advantage over most people who might want to delve into violin making: you know what a good one sounds like and you can play one you make well enough to verify its tone and perhaps be able to make adjustments to improve on that.
I saw a TV show once about a violin maker who was in exactly that same position, and it made it abundantly clear to me that no matter what my woodworking skills might ever become, there was no way I could close the deal, so to speak, on the best configuration of my product. On accounta no fiddlin' skills, you see.
A couple of things you'll probably want that the average maker of sewing cabinets and entertainment centers don't have are a steaming thing (for bending wood) and a bunch of those nifty little clamps for gluing the top and back onto the curved sides. I also think violin makers use tiny planes and scrapers, too.
It probably wouldn't hurt to get in contact with actual violin makers and pick their brains. I would think with the contacts you must have made in the symphony it wouldn't be hard to scare up a couple of possibilities. All else failing, do a search on the internet.
I am envious of musicians of your caliber.
Good luck.
- - LRod
Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999
http://www.woodbutcher.net
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Well, sort of. One of the reasons that I quit playing professionally is that I am going deaf. It's congenital; my dad was pretty much completely deaf by the time he died. I will be wearing hearing aids in another year or so; I already have some problems hearing normal conversation, especially with a noisy environment.
I will have to rely on others to find out if my fiddles are any good.
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Howard responds:

Sorry to hear that, but you will not be alone on this NG. My hearing is well along the way to going all the way, but what I hate more than missed conversations is the constant tinnitus that accompanies the loss. Whistles, bleeps and shrieks are not real fun.
Make sure you get protection for what you hearing have left. Many machines can speed the loss, with highest marks probably going to routers and planers.
Charlie Self I don't approve of political jokes. I've seen too many of them get elected.
http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

Oh, yeah -- I go to great lengths to preserve what I have left. Got a good set of shotgun muffs to wear while running a saw or router (when I'm shooting, I use earplugs in addition to the muffs).
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Try www.mimf.com
Montyhp

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Try www.stew-mac.com and www.lmii.com.
Kevin

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forth from the murky depths:

Not too many tools are needed and most are hand tools. (I picked up a Chiwanese violin for $26 and am learning how to swing a cat. I'm sure they use machines to make the parts, then hand-fit/finish them with cheap labor. Got any tips for me to make it more comfortable to play? My shoulder doesn't like it much.)
1) Pick up some books on instrument building at your local library. (Dewey 787 section)
2) Check with local music shops for info on luthiers in your area. You might be able to trade your time helping them for their instruction. They could probably use your expertise in the use and sound of a good instrument, too. Win/win.
3) Check your local high schools/comm. colleges for night courses in luthiery. (probably mostly for guitar)
4) Check local hardwood lumber stores for music-grade lumber. Grizzly's president builds guitars and now sells wood kits. Check with him to see if he'll supply violin kits, too. www.grizzly.com
Search www.amazon.com for "luthier" and get some books to start.

That will increase as you sell your violins. Are you ready to start teaching violin, too? You are sure to be asked.
Now about that red varnish...
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Check your local music store for shoulder rests. There are lots of different types, and I have used several. The one I use now is not available any more, and I may eventually make a copy of it myself.
Shoulder rests sell from $3 to about $15. Many violin teachers look down their noses at them, which I think is dumb -- you should get whatever works for you.
A long time ago, I agreed to give violin lessons to a couple of high school students. They started out by asking what kind of music they should study. I asked if they planned on making a living playing the violin, and they answered "No." I then told them to pick out whatever kind of music they happened to like, and we would study it together, and I'd work in the appropriate technical skills as needed. I explained that music was to be enjoyed, and if you didn't enjoy it, there wasn't any point in studying it.
They did pretty good...
Y'know... maybe I ought to do some more teaching before I go completely deaf...
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Howard writes:

Do it. With that attitude, you have a lot to give.
Charlie Self I don't approve of political jokes. I've seen too many of them get elected.
http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
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forth from the murky depths:

Thanks. I'll look into it. It is primarily my rotator cuff which gives me the problem, but I saw a picture of some street musicians on the link http://home.att.net/~PeteSchug/ that YoungCarpenter posted. I've been holding my elbow up to get a better grip on the neck. I'll try repositioning.
-snip-

Yes, enjoyment is the ONLY reason to play. Speaking of which, is there any way I can muffle the sound from the voilin as I learn how to play it? (I didn't refer to "swinging a cat" for no reason, y'see.) Spray foam is much too permanent and would prolly burst the instrument.

Go for it!
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"Larry Jaques" wrote in message

Violin mutes which clip to the bridge .. available at any violin shop.
Alternative till you find a real one is a common paper clamp ... the kind you squeeze between thumb and forefinger to open. Add some folded up paper between the jaws to dampen the sound as desired .
--
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There are two ways that I have used. The cheap way is to buy a practice mute. Should be a couple of dollars at most. It's basically a weight with a clip that goes on the bridge, and you could probably easily make one yourself. There is a picture of a wooden mute on page 7 of the ILS catalog at http://www.internationalluthiers.com/pdf/Catalog83.pdf . It doesn't really show how the mute is applied, but the three fingers are slotted so that the mute sets on the bridge with the strings going through the gaps. They don't show a practice mute in the catalog, but you could get one of the wood mutes and either make a heavier copy, or mount a lead weight on it. The more weight in the mute, the quieter.
The other way is to use an electric practice instrument with headphones. I have a homemade 'stick' with a pickup that I paid a friend of mine about $100 to build for me. Commercial e-fiddles can cost several thousand dollars. You need a good pickup, a high-impedance preamp, and a headphone amplifier for this.
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forth from the murky depths:

Got it.

Excellent! I have a nice, dense piece of Jarrah that would love to become a mute. Thanks.

Yes, the Chiwanese models are a few hundred on Ebay. I got the cheapie violin there to learn how to play, and if I continue, I'll get a _real_ violin.
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education, education, education. Places like stew-mac make kits and sell them but they often offer wood, parts, books, plans etc. on the subject Check out www.Musickits.com (I think that's right) www.Internationalviolin.com is a supplier of luthier/parts and educational material. Think about starting with a non-violin instrument like a Lap Dulcimer, an instrument cheap to make and hard to mess up. try a few other links too http://www.graffiti.it/violin/welcome.html (this may be dead) http://www.markedwardsviolins.com / http://www.centrum.is/hansi / http://www.violink.com/ (may be dead)
There are a few who have messed around with violin making on rec.music.makers.bowed-strings. There is a instrument making group too I just can't remember the name. As for financing see if there are any friends in the area who have "always wanted to play a _________" and see if they will pay for the kit or materials or something. Band saws and maybe a table saw are the main power tool. Various planes, finger planes, hand saws, and a few unique [to the instrument] tools make up 99% of the rest. oh yeah and the bending thingy :)
--
Young Carpenter

"Violin playing and Woodworking are similar, it takes plenty of money,
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Howard wrote:

Start by making and selling violin bows. Minimal upfront costs and good markup. It'll also teach you careful tool usage. Dave in fairfax
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reply-to doesn't work
use:
daveldr at att dot net
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One of the last remaining violin-making schools in the west is Peter Prier & Sons Violins in Salt Lake City. I understand they have quite a reputation in the biz. I believe they offer classes that are a couple of months long.
Dave

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Several of my adult nieces and nephews are very talented musicians. Peter Prier's shop has made several instruments (viola, cello) of extremely high quality for them. They were willing to travel from Phoenix several times, in order to acquire these essentially custom purchases.
No affiliation, etc., etc.
Patriarch
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