Fire extinguisher recommendation for a home shop

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Ken Yee wrote:

Know anybody who will sell you one?

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--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
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Halon has a higher CFC "tax" on it than R12, I imagine it is $100 a pound if you could actually find it. This stuff wasn't cheap when it was thought of as being harmless. A typical computer room "dump" was $30,000 or more. I saw one once, a sight to behold ... and it didn't kill us. Flying debris was more dangerous than the gas and nobody stayed in there long enough to breathe much of it. The claxon horn ran most folks off. ;-)
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Do a quick web search. www.h3r.com among others.
ken
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Ken Yee wrote:

Interesting. I didn't realize that anybody was still selling them. Do be sure that you have enough in the bank to cover the fine. Is there such a thing as "halon insurance"?

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--John
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Actually a search on the website shows text from the law that banned halon. It also lists exemptions from the ban on discharging the stuff and one of the exemptions was fighting a fire for which the system was designed.
Rick

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What fine?
<http://www.epa.gov/Ozone/snap/fire/qa.html#qA2>
Must I now dismantle my halon fire protection system?
No. It is legal to continue to use your existing halon system. It is even legal to purchase recycled halon and halon produced before the phaseout to recharge your system.
However, due to the fact that halons deplete the ozone layer, users are encouraged to consider replacing their system and making their halon stock available for users with more critical needs.
Are there any federal laws on emissions of halons?
EPA's final rule published March 5, 1998 (63 FR 11084) prohibits the intentional release of Halon 1211, Halon 1301, and Halon 2402 during the testing, repairing, maintaining, servicing or disposal of halon-containing equipment or during the use of such equipment for technician training. The rule also requires appropriate training of technicians regarding emissions reduction and proper disposal of halon and halon-containing equipment (see the guidance document for more information).
The rule became effective April 6, 1998.
scott
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Scott Lurndal wrote:

Doesn't say anything about not fining you when you discharge the halon.

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In absence of language prohibiting it, it is allowed. It's clear from the text and the rest of the FAQ that using Halon for its intended purpose is perfectly legal so long as the Halon is reclaimed/recycled or was manufactured prior to the ban.
scott
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Doesn't say anything about fining you either. What a crummy rule.
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There is no law saying that breathing is legal either but I do it on a regular basis. I haven't been fined yet.

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On Thu, 23 Sep 2004 23:27:28 +0000, Ken Yee

Halon is good sometimes.
It's really bad if you use a lot of it and don't have a clear path out. The fire may be out cold, but so will you. <G>
Halon also stinks if you need to use it outside, like just outside the shop door, or in an automotive situation. The slightest breeze carries the gas away. DAMHIKT.
Barry
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"patriarch snipped-for-privacy@nospam.comcastDOTnet>" <<patriarch> wrote in message

I have the Home Depot "Kidde" brands in my gara^H^H^H^Hshop. But get ready for anyone with an expertise in fire fighting to weigh in on the quality of these extinguishers.
By my informal data gathering metrics, almost all Professionals tell you to get hooked up with a firm that sells and services quality devices.
One thing they all advocated was periodically shaking the dry chem ones to loosen up the powder. Evidently it can get packed down.

Nope - but I wouldn't want one. My shop smoke detector goes off more frequently than I had anticipated when I do some sanding. Seeing as how my shop time is early am and late evening, that wouldn't work for me.
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On Thu, 23 Sep 2004 19:48:02 GMT, patriarch

============================Try the Fire Company that serves your neighborhood...
Mine is a Volunteer unit and they "did" their thing and I followed their suggestions...
Bob Griffiths
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patriarch < wrote:

When you get your extinguisher, do yourself a favor and read the directions before you have to use the thing. Too many times folks crack that thing, rush into the fire and blow the whole thing right past the fire! If the extinguisher says "Spray from 10 feet" then spray it from 10 feet, not 2 feet! Besides, there is no reason to go and make your eyebrows crispy!
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The MacKenzie brothers came out with a movie some years back. The subject of putting out fires was well covered. It had to do with drinking massive amounts of beer.     mahalo,         jo4hn
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jo4hn responds:

Works great...unless it's an electrical fire at which point life gets lively.
Charlie Self "Half of the American people have never read a newspaper. Half never voted for President. One hopes it is the same half." Gore Vidal
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I still think that in a wood shop you are most likely to have a wood fire. Water is the best way to fight that. If you are sloshing flamable liquids around to the point that you really have to worry about water spreading the fire you should tighten up your flammable liquid procedures or think about calling it a class 1 div 2 and using explosion proof electrical fittings. If you really think your biggest danger is an electrical fire you need to get an electrician out there. My shop is virtually 100% GFCI so a small splash of water will shut it down. I have already said you should have a big ABC extinguisher but I still say a pressurized water is also handy. To start with refills are free and you don't have to refill it everytime you use it. If you squirt a teaspoon of dry powder you are going to be paying to have it cleaned and recharged. The powder keeps the valve from sealing again and it will be dead within a day or two.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Greg) wrote in message

As a volunteer FF, I can affirm that water is really the way to go. Better yet, buy a compressed air/water extinguisher, and some class-A foam mix, and make a couple percent foam/water solution. The foam causes the water to lose it's surface tension, and it will soak into the wood faster, stopping the spread to unburnt wood faster, and then the water will cool off the fire itself.
These are the only extinguishers we carry. We use dirt for flammable liquids, much easier.
What I can't comment so readily on is the fire cause. Sources I can easily see are:
- sawdust lit by a cigarette or spark from "finding" a nail/screw with a saw - pile of oily rags in a hot, enclosed shop - electrical fire (overloaded circuits)
less so: - flammable liquides/vapors
The first list is mostly handled well by an A extinguisher, but not if electrical is involved. There you either need GFCI (which you probably need in your garage shop in the US anyways after the 1999 NEC, and I'd still have a master switch for the room that kills everything but lights, and hit that before grabbing the extinguisher.

Most fires I've been to have been electrical in origin, or heat caused by faulty wiring/ventilation of something electrical (one propane leak was "fun"). Don't forget that thick sawdust (or plane shavings) + hot lights = fire.

I'd get both. Use the water for non-electric stuff, and the ABC for anything that might be live.
-Aaron
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Aaron Wood wrote:

problem, if it isn't the power should still go off, just taking out a breaker/fuse further back. As our visiting firemen tell us "in the event hit it with whatever suits, fuse/breakers will open" they've been know to hit a mains incomer with water to take down the supply in a factory as it was thought to be the ignition source!
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