Finishing Question

I have a client ( a bar) in which i installed a new 8' section of bar top, railing, etc. The owner now wants the rest of the bar refinished to match the new section. I have about 14 hours from start to finish to sand off old finish (not a problem), stain and apply protective finish. The issue is what type of Non-spray finish can I use? The drying time of a post-catalyzied lacquer can be forced by increasing the temp of the building but will it be dry to use in 10 hrs? any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
Scot
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railing, etc. The owner now wants the rest of the bar refinished to match the new section. I have about 14 hours from start to finish to sand off old finish (not a problem), stain and apply protective finish. The issue is what type of Non-spray finish can I use? The drying time of a post-catalyzied lacquer can be forced by increasing the temp of the building but will it be dry to use in 10 hrs? any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Others will be along. Here's my 0.02, FWIW.
While sitting here thinking about it, I don't think I have ever seen a post cat brushed, padded, or applied any other way than sprayed. I guess you could, but most of today's finishes are made to be sprayed so that you can get even application thickness. I think on most post cats you want a coat at about 6mil, difficult to do evenly with a brush. Barry...?
Post cat will give you a good surface, but you should be aware that most are not very abrasion resistant (thinking of a bar top here) and certainly NOT made for repeated dousings with water, alcohol, and different cleaning agents including bleaches. They would be fine for a house, but not so good for the hard use of a bar. At least not the ones I got to!
Post cat will be finished when it is finished. In a shop environment, it is easy to pin down the pot life, cure times, etc. Not so easy in the field, believe me. And if you are on it before it finishes... you will ruin the finish. Period.
Post cat is not a repairable finish. You can coat over it, you can sand and add more to it, but it dries so hard when properly applied that adhesion/witness lines are always a big concern. Damage to the top will stay just that. Stripping or sand this stuff is a real chore and you have to get every tiny spec off before refinishing. Since it is not a highly abrasive resistant finish you might want to look elsewhere to get the repair option.
Of course under ideal circumstances, you would use one of the many "bar top" finishes out there. Just about all of them are good. They don't repair well either, but they are so durable they don't really ever need it.
If I were in your shoes, I would take a look at some of the CAB finishes (one part) that dry almost as hard, and are much easier to control. You will be spraying, not brushing or padding the commercial grade stuff, so get out the tape and the HVLP for it. Benjamin Moore has a good product, and so does ML Campbell. My favorite is the stuff I buy at Kwikkleen (888) 222-9767. They have people on staff that can help you out, including the owner.
They have a modified urethane lacquer that works as well as urethane, but sprays like lacquer. I have never had a bad experience with it, and it DOES bond to itself, redissolving like lacquer. I have no idea how it works.
When I refinish an entry door that doesn't need wood repair, I can strip, sand, dye and put four coats of this finish on in one day. It is dry enough to hang when I am ready to leave. Granted, I have worked a lot with this stuff and spray it with my HVLP, but it is a great example of what is out there.
Good luck.
If you find a finish that works in your time constraints that you can apply successfully, I hope you come back here and tell us.
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

No clue... I don't have much experience with that stuff.
> They have a modified urethane lacquer that works as well as urethane,

I can second the Kwick Kleen stuff. It has a recoat "window", but if you miss it, it reopens five days later. I haven't used lots and lots of it, but I'm impressed with what I've done.
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