Finishing question

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wrote:

Meant blonde shellac. Should have said.

Never seen garnet polyurethane (except maybe some color of Minwax polyshades).

More shiny than I get on raw wood from my stropped plane irons?

How about as explosive as an aerosol suspension of nitrocellulose resin in acetone, toluene, etc.?

That, and the ability to do so quickly.
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I havent' myself now that you bring it up. MIght make since, though.

I am suspecting that you are bragging about the quality of your plane cut. I must say, I would find it hard to believe that any raw wood could be as shiny as a coated and buffed piece, but then again, I haven't seen your planes, either.

Can't buy into that one. As I said, when fully cured, these products aren't toxic. And again, once cured, they don't exhibit any explosive characteristics. I don't see the relevance of comparing cured resins to high V.O.C. solvents.

Absolutely true. Not too many paint booths and clean rooms when they started using it. Speed to keep the dust down and to increase production was the reason it flourished as a finish.
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:
<snip>

<snip>
A "film" finish is anything that form a film on the surface of the wood as opposed to a penetrating finish such as one of various the oil finishes (linseed oil, tung oil). Of the film finishes there are evaporative finishes (lacquer, shellac, and water-base finishes) and reactive finishes (oil based finishes, and catalyzed lacquers and varnishes.
See Jeff Jewett's article at: http://www.homesteadfinishing.com/htdocs/ChoosingFinish.htm
Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net
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Very good info. I had a different assumed definition of build vs film and didn't relate the two as being such comparitive terms.
Thanks for that insight, it really helps my understanding. While I knew the concepts expressed, I had clearly been using the terminology wrong.
Love these groups!
wrote:

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I meant this to be in response to Nailshooter Robert about h is build vs film comments.

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With regard to rubbing things out, my understanding is that wet/dry sandpaper with a soapy water lubricant can be used to level the finish. What sort of soap? I tried it with some diluted dishwashing detergent and it seems to have created spots in the finish. More coats of finish over top seems to have undone the damage, but I am loathe to try it again.
Is it possible that some dishwashing detergents contain silicone, which I understand to be deadly for finishing?
- Ken
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Liquid dishwashing soap is the typical suggestion. Good Q about silicon. Not sure. I've only done it with mineral spirits and it works nice. It actually works better once you get a sort of slurry of sanded powder and the spirits, then it starts to cut like a polishing agent. Just keep adding spirits as they evap. At least that has been my experience with rubbing out poly. I never got to that really nice finish some say is possible. I just killed the nubs, etc. Still regret using ploy though. I feel like I ruined the nice Cherry coffee table and end table but the cutso seemed to like it. Too plastic for me. Since then I always do a sample finish on extra stock for custos before committing to the whole piece.

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wrote:

Thanks for the suggestion about mineral spirits.
The final finish on the piece I've been working on I would describe as "okay". I might wait until the finish cures harder and try to rub it out again, but I'm afraid that I've reached some kind of local maximum. It is not perfect, but I'm afraid more effort on my part is likely to make things worse.
I did make a sample piece that I was very happy with, but it was too small to predict my actual skill level, I think. My sample was only 4"x4", and it has no flaws. The drawer front is 3"x20" and it also has no flaws. The table top has approximately one flaw per square foot. Since the drawer and my sample are both less than half of one square foot the probabilities have worked out exactly. :)
After rubbing with steel wool and wax, the sheen on the top is oddly uneven, too. (More glossy stripes beside less glossy stripes.) The piece looks OK most of the time, but if the light source is oblique the inconsistent reflection really shows. This is what I think I can fix with more rubbing, but I'm going to wait a couple of weeks until the finish is as hard as it will get. And then I'll decide if I want to risk cutting all the way through.
Foolishly, I thought the hard part was over when the dovetails fit. :(
- Ken
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Ken McIsaac wrote:

Murphy's Oil Soap (no the spray version!) works, as does purpose-made Behlen "Wool Lube".

Silicone hurts finishes as you try to apply the finish over silicone. It shouldn't affect a previously appled finish. Many auto and furniture care products have lots of silicone and get used over just about all finishes without damage.
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In most cases, yes, if you just brush it on.
If, however, you let it cure for a couple of weeks and go through the wet sanding, steel wool, pumice, rottenstone, then wax, it will look as good as any finish.
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"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote in message

as
Not my favorite finish, but you are indeed correct. It is often the product/type of finish which gets the blame, when it should be the operator/applicator.
I've seen some gorgeous pieces with a "poly" finish.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 2/20/07
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