Finishing Oil

After making the sample Shawl Pin, which turned out nice for a piece of pine, I decided to go further and make more using much of the Black Walnut I have. Those who read the Shawl Pin topic, will know what I'm referring. Since Black Walnut is not a wood for stain, I will use oil and thus, the reason for this thread is to ask what oils are recommended? Especially something I can use on other types of woods as well, though I assume most oil will suffice in that area?
Thanks
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I will use oil and thus, the

I'd use wax, not oil.
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tommyboy wrote:

If you use an oil, use a "drying" oil. That is, an oil that oxidizes an becomes a stable substance. Linseed oil would work. I prefer tung oil. My favorite is the catalyzed tung oil that Lee Valley sells. Most vegetable oil does not harden, and may become rancid. You would not want to use olive oil, cottonseed oil, etc. Mineral oil is inert but it never dries.
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G.W. Ross

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wrote:

Any type of wax?
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"Meanie" wrote:

-------------------------------------------- My weapon of choice is boiled linseed oil.
Lew
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Is it sold as "boiled" or is it actually linseed oil which you boil?

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I wrote:

------------------------------------------------- "Meanie" wrote:

---------------------------------------------------- "Boiled linseed oil" is sold as a stand alone product.
They tell you to cut it with a thinner for application.
I use turpentire because I like the smell.
Sounds crazy, but that's me.
Have fun.
Lew
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LOL...I wanna be in your world.
Thanks
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Meanie wrote:

Motor oil would not be good. Neither would "mineral" oil. Neither would raw linseed oil (takes too long to dry).
Any drying oil such as boiled linseed oil, tung oil and other relatively esoteric ones will work fine.
Be aware that BLO darkens much as it cures/ages. On dark woods that isn't particularly noticeable unless it has been poorly sanded thereby allowing more oil to stay on.
--

dadiOH
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Thank you>
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On 12/26/2012 6:30 PM, Meanie wrote:

I recommend clear shellac, but any clear finish will work fine. Lacquer is also great. Shellac will dry fast and will turn walnut from milk chocolate to dark chocolate. For something that small I would probably buy a spray can of clear lacquer if that was all I was doing. Myself, I always have a can of shellac on hand, and would apply it with a small piece of rag I could toss when done. After a couple coats of shellac I would hit it with some fine steel wool for a silky smooth finish.
BLO (Boiled Linseed Oil) is also great. BLO has a yellow cast to it that is nice with some woods but not needed for walnut, so I would use just clear shellac or lacquer.
Here is a wedding goblet I made beside the walnut log. The goblet has a couple coats of clear shellac, so you can see how dark the walnut became with nothing but shellac. I finish lathe stuff on the lathe with just small piece of rag dipped in shellac. Toss the rag when done, no muss, no fuss.
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Jack, I can't find your goblet in your photo gallery. Give a link.
Sonny
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Oh oh, the pressure is on. Will do...unless they turn out bad...lol.
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Forgot the attach the link to the pic:
http://jbstein.com/Flick/GobP1050459.jpg
On 12/27/2012 8:47 AM, Jack wrote:

--
Jack
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Beautiful goblet. I'm particularly fascinated at the two rings on the stem. I assume the rings are one piece and you did all on the lathe?
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On 12/27/2012 11:01 AM, Meanie wrote:

Thanks, it's an Irish wedding goblet I made for my daughter's recent wedding. Cut it out of a hunk of Walnut log I salvaged from a neighbors black walnut tree. I tried to tell her she could get good cash for that tree, but she ignored me. It's now firewood and lathe wood. What a shame, the wood is gorgeous.
The rings are one piece and done all on the lathe. Very easy to do, just cut a bead then undercut the bead. Tape the rings to one end of the stem as you cut them loose. Sand them best you can before cutting the suckers loose...
I made a small square box out of it as well with a "firewood" maple hinged lid. The maple lid I think is silver maple from my yard.
http://jbstein.com/Flick/boxP1030144.jpg
http://jbstein.com/Flick/boxP1030209.jpg
The box and lid are unstained and just shellacked, although I think I sprayed the box. It's impossible not to rub the box anytime you get close to it.
I've found shellac is a super finish for Maple and Walnut firewood:-)
--
Jack
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Orange/amber shellac is great on walnut, gives it a warmer tone. Cut to 1 lb, shoot on 4 quick coats, let cure a week, top off with paste wax. 1 lb shellac levels out beautifully, probably won't even need steel wool.

Walnut + shellac = classic combination.
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On Wednesday, December 26, 2012 5:30:57 PM UTC-6, Meanie wrote:

I wanna see some pics, too.
Sonny
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If you want oil, you can do better with varnish cut 50% and applied the same way -- flood, wait 10 minutes, wipe back, let dry, light rub with steel wool, repeat. Costs less than Danish oil and builds faster, won't need to be re-oiled every year.
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