finishing method - care to comment?

I've recently completed a desk in quartersawn white oak. I've finished final sanding to 180 grit and will fume it with ammonia this week (I'll assemble the desk after linseed oil application and before shellac; see below). I've done several tests and am confident in the method.
I've also done some test pieces all the way through the process, and here's what I prefer so far, though I have a few questions and would like to see if anyone has another method of finishing fumed oak that they think I should try before going on with the final stages of the desk:
After fuming (24 hours; 28-31% ammonium hydroxide; 70 degrees), I will apply 3 coats of boiled linseed oil (drying between) and then a few topcoats of natural shellac, using 0000 steel wool between shellac coats. I've tried this and I like the look. It's quite rich, deep golden brown, and difficult to screw up too.
Is there any benefit to waxing over shellac (I know not to wax before shellac and my test of waxing instead of shellac wasn't as rich)? Do you think that a filler or sealer is necessary? If so, precisely what product and when? Is there any other method I should try or anything I'm not thinking of?
Thanks for any comments.
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Bob wrote: [tamp tamp]

You've already gotten some good advice. If your final polish-out of the shellac is with #0000 steel wool (or equivalent), then there's no need to fill the pores. I read some concern over a porous surface being problematic if there is to be writing occuring on the desk (well, paper on top of the desk, naturally). If someone's going to use your desk for a writing surface, they should use a blotter or something similar. Only the most boorish, retrograde, slacking dolt uses real wood as a direct writing surface. Well, that kind of person and/or wonderful kids, but hey, what they do with their french polished curly maple topped desk is their own business. DAMHIKT.
This is why drafting tables are formica ;).
Waxing after shellac yields just a bit more sheen. I prefer the feel of shellac over wax, so I wouldn't bother. Plus, the wax is susceptible to water damage, while the shellac (unless the water is very hot - 150F or more) is not.
As for oiling, for years and years I've been using walnut oil. The color is light and stable, though the oil (when dried) is rather soft. No problem. I use the oil merely for the "wet paper bag" effect. It's that depth we're after. So I thin it (3:1) with turpentine, wipe it on, and then immediately wipe off as much as I can.
Lastly, rubbing shellac with steel wool in between coats is unecessary after the first coat. The first coat will generally raise the grain and you'll want to knock back the nibs. I prefer 320 grit sandpaper on a rubber sanding block, lubed with turpentine. It cuts faster and leaves a more even surface. Steel wool will tend to follow already-established imperfections in the finish. Then I'll complete the finishing schedule using whatever method of applying the shellac is best suited (a whole nother lecture).
Best regards, O'Deen
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