Finishing in a hot and humid garage

I have been reviewing old postings and I think I know what to do about finishing in the winter and keeping the dust down in the garage. I have no idea what to do about finishing in the heat and humidity of the midwest (Columbus, Ohio) in the summer. I am concerned that the finishes will dry too fast or not at all. Can somebody share any thoughts? I have projects piling up.
Thank you!
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Perhaps, a little info on what kind of finish you intend to use would be helpful, paint ,shellac ,laquer ,poly etc
-- mike hide http://members.tripod.com/mikehide2

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In Houston, it gets kinda hot and kinda humid in the summer... Both hover around 100 respectively. ;~) The humidity more than anything seems to really affect the dry time. It can take up to a day for each coat to dry. In low humidity a couple of hours. Low humidity in Houston is anything below 50%.

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On 27 Jul 2003 19:53:10 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@columbus.rr.com (Ellery C) pixelated:

You're right. Cool and dehumidify (both) with a small window a/c unit. Buy used for $50 or new for around $100-150. Make sure to shut it off before starting to finish. They can blow drips of water off their evaporators as they cycle.
----- = Dain Bramaged...but having lots of fun! http://www.diversify.com Comprehensive Website Development
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You don't mention what kind of projects they are, but unfinished projects sitting around in a hot and humid garage sound like a recipe for warping. Depending upon the type of finish, you may want to get them done with minimum lip service to the weather as the lesser of evils.
My un-air-conditioned shop is in Houston, Texas, well noted for it's heat and humidity. I typically finish year around. Currently coming up to speed with spraying shellac with good results as long as I use quality ingredients. Gel varnish and oil/varnish blends also seem to work well for me in this climate.
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When it's humid out, the final coat (poly - varnish) takes days to cure. Read the can for recommended ambient conditions. This will vary from one manufacturer to the next. Although I've only turned it on once, I have an A/C unit in my shop, which of course also dehumidifies.
In winter when it's cold - and the same problem exists, I have to plan since the heat source is a wood stove.
Dust is easy - get an air filter. Don't finish the same day you rip up 400 bf of poplar. Sanding in between coats will clean up any dust that manages to find it's way on the finish. This is also a recommended technique for poly.
Mark from Pasadena, MD
Ellery C wrote:

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