Finished My Cane

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On Feb 25, 5:55 am, "Bonehenge (B A R R Y)"

You do NOT want to know what a carbon fiber tripod for your camera would cost, but the cheapest ones are double that blade cost plus some. The most expensive ones...
Wonderful for backpackers and us old farts who try to get out of lifting too much that's heavy.
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Saw how hockey sticks are made on How It's Made. Neat.
Guess I made my original point a bit vague. A lot vague? Vague. What point? What're we talking about. Anyway, making a cane isn't rocket science. Sure, could look better, but needing a cane NOW, it still looks pretty good. Major point, it was a learning experience. I didn't expect it to look beautiful, even if I'd taken a week to make it. It's the first one, a prototype, in fact, even if not in name. When I make something new, I usually go thru several variations, improving each time. I recently made two routing jigs, both from scratch, because the first didn't work as I wanted. Modified another. May have to make a new version of yet another. That's the way it goes sometimes. So the cane is the first version. Acually, it doesn't look real bad, and it IS functionsl. Function was the first requirement, looks second.
I'd been thinking about rounding the shaft of the cane, but won't. I kind like the flat sides, and that leaves space for carving, or painting, or both, designs - which a kid would probably like if they happen to need a cane. I think I may make at least one octagon, later. But all in all the square shaft makes it kinda distinctive. I was going to round the handle too, but found e straight sides are quite comfortable, so don't plan on rounding any of them. The inside of the handle was cut with a 5" hole saw. Just right.
I suppose the final point is, it doesn't take a rocket scientist to make a cane. Just make one, see how it turns out, then make another one, and make it better. Repeat until you get something you like. I need to double-check, but I think rubber crutch tips are less expensive then rubber cane tips. And, if I recall right, there are rubber tips that go on furniture legs that cost even less. Hell, glue some 1/2" plywood strips together, nothing says you 'have' to use solid wood. Ive got a woodburner that gets little use, and those flat sides would make a nice place to burn some designs on.
JOAT 10 Out Of 10 Terrorists Prefer Hillary For President - Bumper Sticker I do not have a problem with a woman president - except for Hillary.
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On Mon, 25 Feb 2008 05:19:18 -0800 (PST), Charlie Self

Want to hear something interesting?
Carbon fiber bicycle parts have gotten far cheaper! Maybe by a factor of 1/2 over the last five years. Lots and lots of mid-grade CF stuff coming from China.
The top of the line, "defense grade" CF is export restricted, so it's only seen on American made parts, like this frame: <http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes/2008/road/madone/madone69pro/
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Broken pool cues would be another good material but that would mean hanging around biker bars so there might be a chance of being the one the pool cues get broken on.
From talking to the guys at Canemasters their preferred method of finishing is soaking the sticks in mineral oil for 36 hours and then applying several coats of tung oil with progressively finer sanding between coats. The thing about their sticks is they're meant to be more than an aid to walking, they are designed with martial arts/self-defense in mind, they are not the sort of cane one finds in a drug store. For those interested in rolling their own there might be some ideas to be had on the Canemasters web site.
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