Finished

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Having marveled at the craftsmanship of some of the other "rec" denizens, I feel a little sheepish "showing off" a project as relatively simple as this:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguarino/6994186869/in/set-72157627751790027/lightbox /
... but hey, you have to start somewhere. Thanks for all the tips.
Greg Guarino
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On 03/19/2012 06:54 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguarino/6994186869/in/set-72157627751790027/lightbox /
Nice Greg.
Only a preference, but I think I'd have done vertical grain on the cabinet sides, but since it's ply, it doesn't affect strength or anything.
- Doug
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gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery"
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It looks great to me!
--
Best regards
Han
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On 3/19/2012 8:54 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguarino/6994186869/in/set-72157627751790027/lightbox /
Nice attention to details! I build lots of doors that way.
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Do you? With splines? It's funny; part of the impetus for this project was to see if I could actually make a panel door. That had seemed like a daunting task before. Now, less so.
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On Mon, 19 Mar 2012 20:10:21 -0700 (PDT), Greg Guarino

Explain how you did it, Greg. What's the config for holding the panel in and allowing for expansion. Why the small gap between the rails and stiles?
-- When you are kind to someone in trouble, you hope they'll remember and be kind to someone else. And it'll become like a wildfire. -- Whoopi Goldberg
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wrote:

Bueno.
I saw the chamfers, but it looked like gaps, too, all the way down to the splines. Maybe it was the lighting.
-- When you are kind to someone in trouble, you hope they'll remember and be kind to someone else. And it'll become like a wildfire. -- Whoopi Goldberg
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wrote:

Hey, a hearty Well Done, Greg. Kudos on your accomplisment. That's a far larger and more complicated project than most of us started with.
So, how do you like Waterlox now that you've used it? Other than the smell (and it smells far, far better than Watco, lemme tell ya) I simply adore it.
-- When you are kind to someone in trouble, you hope they'll remember and be kind to someone else. And it'll become like a wildfire. -- Whoopi Goldberg
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wrote:

Well, it's not the very first thing I've done. In fact, I made the cabinet boxes (sans doors) fifteen years ago. I cut them down about 6 inches for this project. I've also built and finished a couple of wall-hung cubbyhole shelf units. And I've had a fair amount of experience in home repair. It's a different pew, to be sure, but a related denomination of church, at worst. The techniques may not always be similar, but both require a problem-solving mindset.
That said, the desk is certainly the largest project so far, with the most time-consuming finishing. And the panel doors were probably the biggest challenge I've taken on yet. But as so often happens, I'm sure I could build another set now in a fraction of the time and with fewer errors. Except, of course, for the finishing.
The whole experience has given me more ideas than I have time for, but I intend to keep at it when I can.

I'll tell you some things I've learned for the next project. The most important lesson seems to be wood selection. The waterlox on the oak rails and stiles is probably the nicest finish I have yet accomplished; smooth with a little gloss, but with no plastic-y thickness. I used some garden-variety birch ply for the panels. The contrast in color is nice, but the panel surface didn't give nearly as nice a finish as the oak.
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On Mon, 19 Mar 2012 18:33:29 -0700 (PDT), Greg Guarino

Pew? You can't say those common home-repair words in any church I've been in. ;)

Familiarity breeds content. (sorry for the pun)

Grok that.

It's probably because of the lack of color to begin with. Several more coats might impart a bit of amber to it. Practice on a spare piece about 6" square. Save your wiping rag in a plastic baggie and it'll last for a couple weeks. Leave the bag on the concrete (oily rag hazard) and do a coat the first thing every morning or evening.
Did you remember to remove the air on top of the Waterlox so it doesn't set hard on you? If not, do it RIGHT NOW! It might not be too late... I lost half a quart can that way, but not the gallon!
-- When you are kind to someone in trouble, you hope they'll remember and be kind to someone else. And it'll become like a wildfire. -- Whoopi Goldberg
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Please take these constructively. I'm sure you learned a lot during this build.
1. Your Splines grain is going in the wrong direction. You want this to provide extra support, so you set the grain to go 90 degrees to what you have them.
2. Your case sides grain are going the wrong way. Your grain should go vertical. It looks weird going horizontal.
3. prefinish your panels before glue up so that the unfinished area doesn't show during the winter when panels shrink. Yours are ply so not really a problem. Also glue / flux brushes are not finish brushes.
On 3/19/2012 9:54 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguarino/6994186869/in/set-72157627751790027/lightbox /
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tiredofspam wrote:

Please espline! Which picture reveals the splines you mentioned?
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On Mar 19, 10:16pm, tiredofspam <nospam.nospam.com> wrote:

Hadn't thought of that. I can see now how the strength of the spline would be greater "your" way, but I think it should be adequate in this application as is.

I built that part a while back. Had I been doing it now I might have chosen other wood entirely, but the horizontal grain itself doesn't bother me.

Yes indeed. That realization dawned on me as I was finishing the doors. It was damn near impossible to get an even finish in the corners. I will certainly follow that advice next time.

I thank you for taking the time to delve that deeply into the photo set.

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On Mon, 19 Mar 2012 20:07:10 -0700 (PDT), Greg Guarino

I -thought- I saw a 'wrong' spline there. If the grain direction is the same as that of the stile (which I thought I saw) it can break very easily, especially with the little gaps you had. Slam the door hard once and it could be CURTAINS! G'luck!

It's all a matter of taste, but vertical is more frequently used. I didn't even notice it.

Prefinish the case pieces, too, so the glue doesn't squeeze out onto the bare wood, keeping the finish from adhering and coloring the wood. The bottom to side panel showed a couple of those in one pic.

He's wrong there. Anything which can move finish into a corner is a brush. Needle-nose pliers with a piece of t-shirt in their jaws, q-tips, whatever's handy, but it has to be wiped, too.
-- When you are kind to someone in trouble, you hope they'll remember and be kind to someone else. And it'll become like a wildfire. -- Whoopi Goldberg
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wrote:

The grain runs in the same direction as the stiles, vertically. See below
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguarino/6365597669/in/set-72157627751790027/lightbox /
As for the gap, it's only on the first door I made. The splines were tighter than they should have been, and I guess a little wider as well. I fixed that problem (with a block plane) for the second door.
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On Tue, 20 Mar 2012 03:18:40 -0700 (PDT), Greg Guarino

Oops, not the safest way. Those look to be 1/4" rather than 1/8". Better.

Goodgood.
-- When you are kind to someone in trouble, you hope they'll remember and be kind to someone else. And it'll become like a wildfire. -- Whoopi Goldberg
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On 3/20/2012 12:45 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

By which you mean the small block of oak and the fingers near the miter saw blade? I guess you're right. I am pretty cautious though, especially as one of my other uses for my fingers is at the piano (a much more advanced skill than woodworking, with better cash-flow too)
>Those look to be 1/4" rather than 1/8".

The grooves are 7/32 and splines fit snugly (one might say "tightly" on the first door)

What, you didn't make it to that photo ("shaving down splines")? Eight of the 200 people who viewed the finished desk made it all the way through the set.
I'm something of a photo buff too. I've been amusing myself documenting the project. Some of the "dramatic" lighting was courtesy of a couple of reflector work lights.
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On Tue, 20 Mar 2012 19:16:46 -0700 (PDT), Greg Guarino

LUDDITE!
I already did that the last time you mentioned it. But I need to get the computer talking to my Gecko G540 on LPT3 first, then build my CNC router, then make some money...
-- Knowledge speaks, but wisdom listens. -- Jimi Hendrix
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On 3/21/2012 11:43 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

I'll take an Eiffel Tower then, as big as you can manage. And an alp, if it's not too much bother.
So what do you use the umbrella for? (seriously) Portraits? Pics of your work? Rain? Are CFLs reasonable color-wise these days? Or at least correctable in some way? Aren't there spikes in the spectrum, or am I dealing with old information (and old brain cells to hold it in) ?
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Greg Guarino wrote:

The only purpose of umbrellas (for lighting) is to increase the size of the light source relative to the subject; doing so results in softer, more diffuse shadows and highlights.
Any fluorescent, CFL or not, is deficient in red.
--

dadiOH
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