finish nailer

I'm in the market for a finish nailer to be used "recreationally" for installing trim and building furniture. Anyone have recommendations for:
- 15 gauge vs. 16 gauge? - brands?
Thanks!
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I have and use a Senco 15 gauge finish nailer. Has proved almost faultless over time. Heres my review: http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com/reviews/sencoxp41.htm There are plenty of options in the market though, so do some research before you buy :) -- Regards,
Dean Bielanowski Editor, Online Tool Reviews http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com Over 50 woodworking product reviews online! ------------------------------------------------------------ Latest 6 Reviews: - Ryobi EMS1830SCL 12" SCMS - Bessey K-Body Clamps - Lumber Wizard Metal Detector - Pocket Hole Drilling Jig Project Book - Kreg Universal Bench Klamp - GRR-Ripper System & MJ Splitter ------------------------------------------------------------
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Porter Cable has/recently had a neat bundle with compressor, 15 ga finish nailer and 18 ga brad nailer. $300 at the home centers.
I'm happy with my Porter Cable nailers. Others have expressed similar opinions here. 5 out of 5 recreational nailer owners on my block use Porter Cable. Of course, that makes it a lot easier, when you need 'ammo' on a weekend project....
Patriarch
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On Tue, 14 Sep 2004 05:42:06 GMT, patriarch

I have the same kit, but sometimes wish it included 15 gauge finish gun.
The 15 ga models usually have angled heads for reaching into corners, the nails hold trim better, and there are several oil less models available, like the Senco or Bostich.
The 16 ga PC nailer (FN250B??) is fine when finish nails are required on furniture. The straight head is hard to get into tight spots when installing things, and 2 1/2" nails protrude out of the bottom. They can scratch finished items if you're not careful! DAMHIKT! This is even worse when a customer is watching you install shop-finished casework. I now wrap shop rags around the bottom when I have to get into tight places. Most of the time, 18 ga brads would be fine where you'd use a 16 ga nail.
I feel the best pair would be an 18 ga brad gun for furniture and cabinetry work, and a 15 ga angle head finish nailer for trim and casework installation.
Barry
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I have a P-C FN250B 16ga nailer and my only complaint is that it lacks a dry fire limiter. Though if I hadn't needed it in a hurry I probably would have shopped around a bit more.
Charlie
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I have the PC 250A (15 ga.) I like it a lot. I've had no problems with it. I also have a Harbor Freight 18 ga. brad nailer, which works fine for $20 (i.e. no need to replace it). These two are a great combination.
I don't see a 16 ga. nailer fitting in usefully. The nails are a little slim, and they may deflect, but they are too big for delicate work. An 18 and a 15 are a wonderful combination.
I also have a Bostitch FR framing nailer. It performs well too, even though I got it at a pawn shop. It performs well enough that I would consider the magnesium Bostitch 15 ga. finish nailer (which is very lightweight), but I got a better deal on the PC.
-Mike

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