Finish for Outdoor Redwood Furniture

I am building a couple of Adirondack chairs from Redwood. I found some nice clear Redwood for most of the visible slats, arms etc. Under-structure is construction grade Redwood. This stuff is hard to find in Kansas.
I want to preserve the color and not let it gray out. I have googled and found lots of recommendations for oils including teak oil and others. So many variations I am about as confused as when I started. A suitable penetrating oil seems to be the way to go. Do any of you guys have experience with a similar project? They will be outdoors.
Thanks RonB
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Penofin oil. It comes in clear but will darken the wood but it is beautiful. Also comes in toned colors so you can shift towards a red. I prefer the clear.
I know a local guy who builds very high-end redwood furniture and you can't get it from him without Penofin. Contractors also swear by it.
Others should confirm on here I believe.
On Wednesday, June 20, 2012 2:13:53 PM UTC+2, RonB wrote:

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Yep. -- Doug
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I suggest you use the least expensive oil or oil / film finish mixture you can find that is suitable for outdoor use. None of these finishes will last more than a year or three. The wood turns gray due to light and water. You will have to retreat every year. One goal is to use something that you will not have to apply more than once a year. I do not think you would want to apply the oil twice or three times during the spring or summer months.
Good Luck.
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RonB wrote:

That's because the manufacturers are selling snake oil. The preponderance of the oil finishes are using boiled linseed oil. It protects well, does darken as it ages. How much it darkens depends upon how much was absorbed. You wouldn't notice the darkening on redwood assuming it is heart redwood.
Another often used oil is tung oil, comes from the nut of the tung tree. It doesn't darken, is good stuff. There are other oils derived from trees too...penofin uses rosewood oil.
Many manufacturers also include some varnish in their product. The names that manufacturers give their products are frequently misleading (by design); e.g., you can bet that anything that calls itself "tung oil finish" is mostly linseed oil with a dollop of tung.
Personally, I am happy with linseed oil, tung if I want to be fancy. It is more expensive to buy but can be diluted with paint thinner 3-4:1. Regardless of what you use, expect to renew it as soon as water stops beading.
--

dadiOH
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''RonB" wrote:

---------------------------------------- Snake oil.
What ever brand you choose, expect to apply it at least semi annualy.
Lew
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wrote:

Penofin. I've used it on furniture and I'm in the process of rebuilding my deck with Tigerwood decking. The Penofin oil makes it look beautiful. Other wood that I've coated once a year still looks good and has not grayed out.
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I went to the local paint store that contractors prefer, and asked what they use on house exteriors. Got Sikkens Cetol and have been impressed by that.
John S.
On 06/20/2012 07:13 AM, RonB wrote:

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Sikkens is one that has popped up in separate research with the Penofin that several have mentioned here. Also, I have found several recipes for exterior finish that are similar to home-brew wiping finish. The most common recipe is:
- 1/3 Spar Varnish - 1/3 BLO - 1/3 Mineral Spirits.
The ratios vary a little but the spar varnish is supposed to provide the UV protection and flexibility. This reminded me of the Maloof finish which was very similar and simple. I have chair #2 about 1/2 finished ant then I'm gonna have to do something.
RonB
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wrote:

Good luck, I hope it works better for you than for me. It is supposed to be very good, but the only outdoor wood (cypress) that ever rotted on me had Cetol on it. Maybe I got a bad batch of wood or Cetol.
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Thanks for a lot of good input. I finished the chairs last week and opted to go with a home-blended mixture of equal parts mineral spirits, BLO and spar varnish. I have four coats applied and will sand lightly for the second time tomorrow and put on a fifth and probably final coat. The home-brew provides a beautiful finish on the redwood, each coat slightly darker and more red.
Of course time will tell on durability.'
RonB
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