Finish for oak end tables

Page 2 of 3  
That's right expert. I consider gloss a glare off of the surface of a finish rather then the penetration and depth and also 3D effect you get by rubbing out. But then again you are the expert with such vast experience...........
Read Odeen"s post about experts who have "read" something. It's tailored for you.
--
Mike G.
snipped-for-privacy@heirloom-woods.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike why are you getting upset? You may wanna consider increasing your dosage of whatever antidepressant your on.
I never said I was an expert, however I did say I disagree with you.
You said if you want a gloss on a finish don't rub out. Do you really believe this? You may be alone on this one Mike.

Really? Because what I have read from your posts you consider glare the reflection off of wood grain.

WHAT?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike,
I don't know here you having been buying your wood, but the wood I buy isn't very reflective.
What is that your using "mirrorwood" ?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There's an inherent danger in armchair woodworking (or armchair anything for that matter). While arming (pun intended) oneself with as much information as possible before plunging madly into some sort of endeavor is a good idea, eliminating a viable solution (for any kind of problem), based merely on what you've read seems to be on the close-minded end of things. Believe 3/4 of what you see, 1/2 of what you read and 1/4 of what you hear. I dunno who said that.
As for shellac's supposed vulnerability to water - did you know buttonlac (shellac that's prepared in a rather unusual way - it's wrapped up in cloth and literally roasted over a fire; the molten lac is subsequently squeezed out in fat drops and allowed to cool on steel plate, forming a button-like glob of resin) is the preferred finish for the hulls of wooden whitewater canoes? The reason is because the buttonlac is quite hard, is resistant to (cold) water, is easily renewed and slips over rocks and boulders like you can't believe. If an oak end table is getting heavier use than the hull of a whitewater canoe, then well, there are some serious issues going on in that living room.
As for my analysis on the whys and wherefores of shellac's replacement finishes, it is based on conversations/correspondence with many pros in the finishing field, including exporters of shellac, finish manufacturig reps, published authors (like Bob Flexner and Jeff Jewitt to name a few), and my own observations of the industry. I'm a bit reluctant to quote people directly, as I was not conducting interviews and so I don't have their permission. So, while these opinions are my own, they are not baseless.
Spraying to all fields - Watsoni and I have had many off-line conversations, and so he and I go back a bit of a ways. He knows my druthers on lacquer, having sprayed/polished/breathed my own fair share while toiling in automotive spray booths. I used to use lacquer on woodDorking projects as well, and I can't argue any of Tom's points on it's ease of spraying, clarity and ability to take a high polish. I do, however object to that plasticky look/feel one typically sees on such otherwise fine articles of woodworking known as guitars. I think once you've seen a french polished guitar (or ukelele), there's no going back to lacquer. For some astounding work in shellacked instruments, check this site:
http://www.ukuleles.com (The owner/build is a former customer)
Lastly, a sanity check on "high-use" furniture. Without sounding condescending, it seems on so many fronts we want to have it all. In the case of dining/kitchen tables, there has evolved this expectation that one ought to be able to achieve a french-polish-like finish, and still be able to glue model airplanes, change the baby, pull ear mites from the cat, refinish an old radio, cook a small pig on a spit, serve dinner on rustic stoneware, strip the finish off an old jewelry box and feed the family on that one magically finishes surface, all without consequence.
I (and I'm not alone, or companies like www.tablepads.com wouldn't exist) employ table clothes, coasters and trivets to protect the table's finish. This is only briefly, during mealtime. The rest of the day, the dining table is displayed in all it's wonderful glory (such as it is). Minor water spills, provided they're wiped up within a day or two are gone without a trace. Yes, I said a day or two. If you can't get to a spill withing a couple days, you are a slacker and deserve a damaged finish. A spilled alcoholic drink? Hahahahahahaahahahaha. Way too dillute to bother shellac, unless you judiciously refresh the spill for a few days. What kind of craziness would that be? I mean fer chrissakes people are still refinishing their floors with shellac, and we're worried about end tables getting too hard use?
Shellac - it's the only finish that's a combination dessert topping, floor wax and hairspray... and it's certainly good enough, if not the best choice, for casual end tables. That's my story and I'm sticking to it.
O'Deen
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Believe half of what you read? Does that apply to your posts? Just kidding. :)
My next table I'm going to try shellac.
But I'm afrad if I go shellac that I may never go back. :)
Thanks for the info.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Of course. Glad the irony wasn't wasted.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
brought forth from the murky depths:

There are.

The actual quote is "A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds." Emerson (responsible for boobulous beach games in LoCal?) said that. I just finished "Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion" and Cialdini referred to this line as part of the "click/whir" function of our minds.
Kinda like reacting to a .@. troll, wot?
Engaged.
---------------------------------------------------------------- "Let's sing praise to Aphrodite || www.diversify.com She may seem a little flighty, || Full Service Websites but she wears a green gauze nighty, || PHP Applications And she's good enough for me." || SQL Database Development
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hey weirdo.
What the hell are you talking about?
Are you from Oz?
troll, wot?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Do I look like a polecat and sound like a chick? I read that piece of shit book too.
troll, wot?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
What does this mean?

pixalized:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 19 Jan 2004 16:37:30 GMT, "js"

Flexner, in his book Understanding Wood Finishing, says "Because of shellac's POOR resistance to water, alcohol, heat and alkali, it's not the best finish for tabletops or other surfaces that are subject to frequent use."
I'd vote for a polyurethane finish which has highest resistance to water damage and most duraable finish altho v hard to repair - usually requires stripping/sanding if top gets really messed up.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
shellac prevents water vapor from penetrating the wood, but it is NOT "water resistant"
dave
js wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
For the uses you are describing I don't see any reason to complicate things by worrying about exotic finishes. If you really feel you need lots of protection just get an off the shelf polyurethane varnish. It will do the job just fine.
--
Mike G.
snipped-for-privacy@heirloom-woods.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Varnish isn't a very good protectant for dings, especially if you have kids. I vote for polyurethane over plain wood conditioner.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Not to be a smarty pants Wilson but, polyurethane is a type of VARNISH.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
had to re-read. I thought he meant lacquer.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
perhaps you meant "conversion varnish"? It's available at Sherwin Williams, for one. But don't buy it unless you like working with hazardous materials. It's got some real nasty chemicals in it.
Instead, IF you have any HVLP you can get good results with Enduro water borne lacquer or poly. You have to order it via 1-800 or look up Compliant Spray Systems. You can also get a catalyzer that makes the finish more durable, which could be added when spraying the top. As a matter of fact they suggest that you only add the cat. to the final coat. I bought some cat. but haven't needed to use it yet. The poly goes on beautifully with HVLP. Dries fast. Must be sanded between coats for adhesion according to the mfg. I haven't taken any chances and recoated without sanding...
dave
Brian Turner wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
http://woodworkdoctor.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 19 Jan 2004 05:19:54 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@centurytel.net (Brian Turner) wrote:

Of course it's there, it's extremely common. So common in fact that the "catalysed" part isn't normally mentioned. The only time we do regularly talk about "catalysed varnish" is when it's not pre-catalysed (as most of them are) but it's something like acid-catalysed floor varnish that needs to be mixed immediately before use.
Get a copy of Flexner, or Google this ng. for more finishing information than you can shake a stick at. -- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Just to satisfy my curiosity. Where did you find Bob Flexner discussing catalyzed varnish?
--
Mike G.
snipped-for-privacy@heirloom-woods.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.