Finish


Thanks to those who responded to my glue question, now for the finish question. What clear finish would you put a mahogany sign that will be out in the hot and humid Alabama weather?
Thanks
Deb
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Spar? Tom
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Again, it is also a big concern for boatbuilders. And you know, what? My experience shows, no varnish works miracles. Shorter or longer exposition to elements, as well as wood's shrinkage causes varnish to crack and peel-off. Water gets trapped underneath and causes discoloration of wood. Instead I prefer deep impregnation with teak oil, linseed oil or tung oil. With time the wood weatherizes and gets what I consider a noble patina. As far as epoxy glue goes, the west system by the Gudgeon Bros is a very good source of information. Have fun!
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Dr. Deb wrote:

Any will need periodic re-doing. The hardest to re-do is polyurethane varnish; the easiest is a penetrating oil. The longest lasting is probably a good marine varnish (not poly and not spar) with lots of UV inhibitors. It should last 1-2 years if it receives sun most of the day, longer if not. It isn't cheap, just paid $25 for a quart + $10 S/H. It should be re-done *before* it gets flaky/yellowed/chipped.
I'd use oil.
-- dadiOH ____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.06... ...a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
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Deb, Why don't you make it out of Epe. Glues great, finish with oil. It will last longer than most of us.
Dave
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Teamcasa wrote:

Simple answer is, I am in Alabama. To those of you in the rest of the country, that answer may need a bit of "fleshing out." There is a lot we do not have here. You have to realize, down here the three main food groups are "grits, grease and greens." I live about 30 miles south of Montgomery and cannot buy a sheet of 1/2" birch plywood anywhere in the city of Montgomery. I can get 1/4 and 3/4 but no 1/2. If I want any "exotic" plywood, I have to buy it through a lumber yard, who does not stock it, drive across the street and pick it up at a plywood wholesaler.
Now for the mahogany, I have a rather large mahogany importer about 65 miles away. Prices are good and the folks are good to deal with.
Sooooooooo, it is mahogany by default. I could go with cypress, but it is actually harder to get my hands on than the mahogany. Go figure.
Deb
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wrote:

This source might be of use to you in the future. Also about 60-odd miles from you in Chilton County. <URL:http://www.hardwoodweb.com/distribution/hia.cfm
Now back to my grits.
--
Chuck Taylor
http://home.hiwaay.net/~taylorc/contact /
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Dr. Deb wrote:

Ipe seems to be available at this place in Montgomery: http://www.aplusfences.com/productinfostart.html
R
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Teamcasa

Most decking suppliers do carry Ipe. Maybe look for one of those. It really is a better choice. Pass the grits! Dave
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Teamcasa wrote:

I find some resistance to Ipe when I mention it to customers, then I mention it's similar to mahogany and they go, "Oh, well, then..."
They really do need to come up with a sexier name for it. For a while, when I first became aware of it, they called it Ironwood which isn't really a species. Right idea, though.
R
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Similar to Mahogany??? OK, I guess they both came from a tree, but similar?

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Max Mahanke wrote:

Okay, well it's not similar in look, or workability, and, well, yeah, there is little similarity other than the general tonality, but it's billed as the outdoor mahogany and I fly with that!
I'm serious about the name, though. Ipe sounds like a cat starting to hack up a furball. Mahogany has a nice ring to it. You'd never see Diana Ross starring in a movie titled Ipe.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

No. That is entirely different. More like someone agitating a mix of gravel and jello through an inner tube.
er
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Enoch Root wrote:

I'm not going to ask how you know that. A man has a right to his privacy.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

I'd suggest "Tabebuia" but it's hard to say :)
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Deb, Read the 'answers' to date . . . only one seemed to address the question.
'The' answer isn't simple. Or rather it is, but takes time and a small amount of effort. And MY preference IS Mahogany.
First, two coats of unthickened epoxy. This will truly seal the wood from the environment. Now apply about 6 coats of a UV Varnish. IF the piece won't be 'handled' a quality 'long-oil' Spar varnish is what you want. If it will be handled or touched - then use a 'short-oil' UV additive varnish. With either, use the following application schedule; disposable foam brushes do nicely. 1} 1st coat - thinned about 25-50 percent with mineral spirits. 2} scuff sand with 100 grit & wipe clean with cloth moistened with mineral spirits 3} 2nd coat - thinned 10-25 percent 4} scuff sand with 220 grit wrapped around a flat sanding pad or wood block - make sure all is even - wipe with MS 5} 3rd coat - 'straight' varnish - thin coat, well brushed out 6} gently & evenly scuff sand with 320 grit - wipe with MS 7} 4th coat - even coat of varnish - 'flowed' on and 'tipped' off 8} gently & evenly sand with 400 grit - wipe with MS 9} 5th coat - flow on and tip off 10} gently & evenly sand with 600 grit - wipe off with MS 11} At this point, either apply a 6th coat, or put on two applications of UV resistant automotive wax - well buffing in between. Because you are allowing 24-hours curing time between coats, this approach takes a bit of time. The actual application only takes about 15 minutes - the rest is PATIENCE. However, once you are done . . . your DONE. Depending on the environment, you may need to re-wax once or twice a year. On a boat, where you don't apply the wax, it is typical to 'refresh' the top layer of varnish every one to two years . . . 'As Needed'{scuff sand & apply a thin coat}.
Regards & Good Luck, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop {PS - be glad to send you a couple of photos}

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General Finishes 'Outdoor Oil'. Has UV screen, heat stabilizers, algicide, and does not build a film so maintenace/repair is simply slop another generous coat on.

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I live in eastern PA. I used Sikkens "Cetol" product on a mahogany side light for my front door. I admit my project faces North West, but after 18 months the finish looks as good as new.
This product has a dye, which for the outside gave a nice deep brown hue. I think this would look good on your sign.
Now finding this may not be so easy.
Dave Paine.

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