Finding matching material for a miter slot


I'm building a crosscut sled.
I have a Rigid TS3650 which has the t-slots. I would love to find a material for the miter slides that I could use that would take advantage of the t-slot but I am coming up empty in my search.
Looking for any suggestions.
Thanks.
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Would this work?
http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page 337

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You might try look here too.
http://www.woodpeck.com/tmiterchannel.html
Mike O.
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Why not use some phenolic strips (i.e. from lee valley), and do the same as a miter gauge.. Screw a washer in from the bottom?
MikeMac
wrote:<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt;&gt;I'm building a crosscut sled.<BR>&gt;&gt;<BR>&gt;&gt;I have a Rigid TS3650 which has the t-slots.&nbsp; I would love to find a<BR>&gt;&gt;material for the miter slides that I could use that would take<BR>&gt;&gt;advantage of the t-slot but I am coming up empty in my search.<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; You might try look here too.<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; </FONT><A href="http://www.woodpeck.com/tmiterchannel.html "><FONT face=Arial size=2>http://www.woodpeck.com/tmiterchannel.html </FONT></A><BR><FONT face=Arial size=2>&gt; <BR>&gt; Mike O.</FONT></BODY></HTML>
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Keith wrote:

The answers so far have directed you to plain rectangular bars. From your question, I'm guessing that you may be hoping to find a T section bar instead.
I don't know of any T section bars commercially available. The T slots in different brands of saws vary a bit in their dimensions, which may be one reason no one has made bars available. They don't vary much, but there are differences. In particular, in the thickness of the "ledges" over the slot. All of the slots, however, should take a standard 3/8" x 3/4" bar. You can get steel bar of this size in either plain cold rolled or precision ground flat stock, at a local steel distributor or by mail. In my experience, the cold rolled has been accurate enough.
So, why do I know all this about table saw T slots? A number of years ago, I made up some featherboards for my Delta saw that used T nut studs I had milled on my milling machine. A local hardwood and millwork company asked me to make some for their shop and for sale, which I did. All I could guarantee was that they fit the slots in my saw. Some of the people with other saws - particularly Powermatic - found that the nuts when tightened were very slightly above the table surface. Thinner ledges.
For my own sled I just use the 3/8 x 3/4 steel bar. I could use 3/8 x 7/8 or so bar and mill the steps into it if I wished, but I haven't yet seen the need. Or, I could mill the bar at the ends and screw on a plate or washer to engage the T slot, as some of the miter gauges do. One thing to keep in mind, though - those T slot ledges are much more delicate than those on, say, a milling machine. The featherboard nuts are fine, since they are in the middle of the table. But, with something unwieldy like a sled, you could conceivably exert enough force when putting it on or taking it off to chip out a T slot.
Steel, aluminum, wood or some of those UHMW plastic bars - any of them should be fine.
More than you wanted to know, probably.
John Martin
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take a $20 dial caliper to the wood aisle, find the closest width larger, then sand down. rip to lengths. Build sled platform. Place strips in slots. Place sled platform on top. Screw from top down. Raise blade. Adjust (|-- , not |>--screws from bottom up for fence(s). |>-- will pull to center of hole, (|-- allow alignment on shoulder.
-
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Got a router table?

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I bought a Rockwell/Delta 12/14 saw made in the mid 50's whic, of course, came with no miter gauge.
The miter slots are made in a T-Slot configuration and do not match the original specs (due to normal wear and tear combined with a Blanchard ground top).
I am not a machinest and do not own any metal working equipment other than hand tools.
I used 3/8 x 1" cold rolled steel bar stock from the local steel supply house. The bar stock did not fit as snugly as I wanted due to wear and tear on the miter slot sides. I drilled and tapped an 8-32 through hole (slightly lower than center of the 3/8" side to engage the machined T-slots) at the front and rear of each piece of bar stock. I ran an allen head set screw (coated with Loc-Tite in from each side of the bar stock, fiddled with the adjustment for a while and now have miter slides that are a jam-up rock solid fit.
Of course the set screws will wear, but can be easily replaced in the next 50 years or so (my son will have the machine by that time).
It worked for me and miight work for you.
regards; tlc...
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tlc... wrote:

If you have to do it again, there's another option to consider.
Precision ground flat stock is available from various metalworking suppliers. For something like this, I'd normally choose the low carbon steel over the higher carbon varieties that may be oil or air hardened. However, the higher carbon varieties are usually available in both standard sizes and in pieces that are slightly oversized to allow for grinding after hardening. I don't know about all manufacturers, but I do know that the Starrett oversize stock is .010" to .015" over nominal size. You can file it to fit. Sounds as though you may have had to file or grind the thickness anyway to allow for the re-ground top.
John Martin
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The set screws are far harder than the cast iron. The slots will wear first. I don't remember who sells it but there is a kit out there that does the same thing but uses wear pads of a softer material.

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Keith wrote:

Why worry about the "tee"?
I build sleds all the time, often building one-off jobbies for specific tasks. My runners are simply scrap maple, birch, oak, walnut, whatever is within reach, planed to fit the slots.
If you're wanting extra room as the device enters or leaves the saw table, leave the runners long.
I actually remove the little washers off store bought devices, as I find they cause more problems than they cure.
Barry
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