Finally...Good News from real Environmentalists.


In 19th Century America, oak was considered a scrub wood. Chestnut along with mahogany) were the woods of choice for craftsmen. (Don't fuss at me. I know other woods were used.)
A fungus blight killed 99.9 percent of the chestnut trees in America.
Now, there is real progress in programs to introduce Chestnuts back into the American forests. It'll take twenty years to get just the right mixture, and another forty years to see results, but it still makes me feel warm and fuzzy knowing that someday, one of the most beautiful woods in the world will be available to craftsmen and woodworkers.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2005/12/1229_051229_chestnut.html
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Crap, guys. I miss-sent this post to the wrong NG. Sorry about that.
James...

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Actually, I thought you did good. Not the obligatory OT at the front which could get you fragged to death here, but a great woodworking article.
I would like to think that in the future, some of our progeny will have a chance to work with real wood, and no just MDF, OSB, or plywood as the only choices for their projects.
Robert
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I followed a link provided by poster in this NG. Kudos to him. Just wanted everyone to know, my post was meant for a political NG, not a woodworking NG. I wouldn't have posted such a provocative subject line in this NG.
James...
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Amused wrote: Just wanted everyone to know, my post was meant for a political NG, not a woodworking

Why you sorry SOB, Plonk! Hee-hee!
Seriously, I love the way Chesnut looks and I kind of like the way it smells too. My Grandfather had an old chest of drawers made of chesnut. We cleaned it up, sanded and refinished in a shellac with a little tint. Beautiful grain.
Now, see here, next time post something about Jimmy Carter!!
Tom in KY, PLONK!!!!
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Many moons ago, I was working for an auction company, and one day, we had a beautiful chest to sell. I didn't recognize the wood. No one recognized the wood, until an antiques dealer got a good look at it. She notified us that it was chestnut, and she damn sure wasn't going to tell us any more until the bidding was over. She bought it.
It was a mid-19th Century blanket chest, or some such name.
James.. Alder wood, is a close second in looks, IMHO, but some of those chestnut logs must have been HUGE.
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Geez, what group did you *intend* to post to? Seems quite on-topic to me ...
--
Regards,

JT
Speaking only for myself....
  Click to see the full signature.
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Amused wrote:

It would be nice, but don't count your chestnuts before they're roasted.
"It takes several generations to get the proper mix. The first breeding produces a tree that is half Chinese and half American. That tree and its descendents are then back-bred with American parents until the fourth breeding produces a tree that is only one-sixteenth Chinese chestnut.
"This tree is then bred with a similar tree to produce an American chestnut with resistance equal to that of the original Chinese parent. Those descendents will then be bred with each other to produce what is hoped will be the new line of blight-resistant American trees."
In other words, we'll know in about 40 years if it's gonna work.
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