Final sand for shellac

Finishing blanket chest. Outside sanded through 0000 steel wool and then tung oil.(4 coats thinned to 4-1) Inside using amber shellac because I'm not crazy about oils in contact with clothing. Question is.....how far do I go so that shellac will bond well. 150? 180? 220? Planning on 3 coats. sanded between coats.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Lee" wrote in message

IME, 150 is plenty far enough ... 180 for the anal.

IME, sand/steel wool, lightly, only after the first coat unless there is an obvious need to between coats.
Then wait 30 days and rub down with a brown paper bag.
YMMV ...
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 2/20/07
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sounds like a good plan, but what is with the paper bag?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Lee" wrote:

A very fine "abrasive" ... there are "film" type abrasives that work equally as well, but a brown paper bag is a whole lot cheaper. I use the paper from a grocery bag to rub down the final coat on all the shellacked pieces I spray.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 2/20/07
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

then you don't have any chance of getting shellac to bond to it. Am I misunderstanding something here?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A bit. The exterior will be tung oil but the interior shellac. Hopefully I will be able to keep the two apart. I plan on applying the shellac first ( to the interior only) then the oil to the exterior . That way I hope to sand any overage shellac off where the oil will be. I would rather not have any oil finish in the storage area.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Shellac will bond with oil. It's often used to connect dissimilar finishes, including oils.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

places. Sorry.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

planning to do the two seperately, but shellac is often used to provide a bond between two dissimilar finishes. Just fyi.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Bond well? Shellac is and evaporative finish. This means that when you apply one coat of evaporative finish on top of another, the solvent of the new coat partially dissolves the previous coat, and thus forms a bond between coats.
--
Stoutman
www.garagewoodworks.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sorry if I wasn't clear. The shellac will be put on the raw wood

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

wood, depending on the shellac "cut" (dilution). The solvent is alcohol and that will soak into most woods enough to establish a "bond" at relatively high grit numbers.
What kind of wood is the inside (closed pore or open pore)? Do you want a very smooth glossy finish?
The higher the last grit of sandpaper, the smoother the wood and the harder it is for a liquid to penetrate. For the inside of a chest, I think I'd stop at 180, again, depending on the type of wood and how smooth you want the finish.
And by the way, the best thing to do is try the finish on some scraps first. No sense guessing when dealing with a finish.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Why would it be more difficult for the finish to penetrate at higher grits? The pores are still going to be there at the same density and the same pore diameter.?. The only thing that has changed is that the scratches left by the lower grits are finer. Why would 'finer' scratches produces less penetration of an alcohol soluble finish? Unless I am mistaken, most of the finish is going to penetrate into pores, not scratches.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Extremely high grits are more prone to burnishing the wood, which will harden and tighten the fibers to the point where a high viscosity finish has a difficult time penetrating.
Shellac works like water, because of its polar solvent, so it's the equivalent of that water wipe you use to set up those fibers and break the case-hardening. Sand until you're happy, apply the first coat of shellac, and you'll still have to dewhisker a bit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Do a test, but I wouldn't worry. Shellac will stick to oily wood better than anything else except oil. I've never had it not stick when French polishing with a mineral oil - pumice prep. The shellac sinks under the oil, displacing it to be wiped off with naptha as the final step.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thank You one and all for the help

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.