Filling small gap in mitered join

My medicine cabinet door w/inset mirror project is coming right along. The door frame, which will hold the mirror, is built of poplar w/45 degree miters, joined with biscuits and glued with urethane glue. It's not fine woodworking but once painted it will look all right. Hey -- it's square, flat, feels solid, and will fit the cabinet. I take my little victories where I can.
One of the joints didn't close completely and needs a bit of filling. The gap is no more than 0.02'' wide and half that deep. I have "Plastic Wood" and that lightweight white spackling compound on hand. But this is such a small gap that I would not expect either to sit down in it real well when I go to finish sand before painting. What's a good filler with strong adhesion for filling a small gap like this?
--
Mike "Rocket J Squirrel" Elliott
"Still got all nine fingers!"
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Mike Rocket J. Squirrel Elliott wrote:

snip

snip
You may be able to just burnish the gap shut. Use a smooth screw driver shaft, chisel neck or the like and rub each edge towards the gap. If you're careful you won't round the mitered corner line noticably.
charlie b
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On 12/15/2004 12:50 AM charlie b wrote:

Good idea. That may work on the outside of the frame, but not on the face. Maybe just a little bead of wood glue there, and sand down is all I need.
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Mike "Rocket J Squirrel" Elliott
71 Type 2: the Wonderbus
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Hi Mike,
I have used Minwax "advanced" wood filler to fill small (or even larger) gaps in painted projects.
It is a two part filler that dries rock hard in about 20 minutes or so. It's around $5 or so, but you get a large amount so you can have it for other projects. Once sanded smooth, the gap vanishes. I like it because it doesn't seem to shrink like some others.
Miters always drive me crazy for some reason. There always seems to be a small gap here and there.
Lou
wrote:

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The min wax is good stuff but a little expensive for a small job. As long as you are painting , you may get away with regular spackling compound, not lite or even joint compound,
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"Mike Rocket J. Squirrel Elliott"

since it's to be painted, bondo.
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bondo is your best and most permanent fix.
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"Mike Rocket J. Squirrel Elliott"

I've used a product called PC Woody; it's a two part, sort of epoxy like filler. I used it to fill in some areas in window frames that had dry- rotted over the years (cleaned out the dry rot, first, of course).
This stuff worked really well - good working time, filled with no shrinkage, and was pretty easy to work with after.
I painted over it, and you can't tell the difference between it, and the surrounding good wood.
Got it at the local Ace Hardware ...
Regards, JT
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The best way is to get a good fit to begin with.........if necessary hand plane the inside edge at a slight angle.

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John Thomas wrote:

like
dry-
the
Whats wrong with plain old two part epoxy? It's a little hard to sand down but with a small gap shouldn't be a problem. Painted, it will be invisable.
Fred
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In general, probably nothing.
In my case, I had a number of corner areas to do, and wanted something easier to work than regular epoxy, yet stronger than "bondo"-like materials (eg, regular wood filler, spackle, whatever).
This stuff fit the bill -- good working time, easy enough to sand afterwards, and no issue with paint adhesion. (The mfr claims you can sand, drill, or plane the stuff. Dunno that I'd want to plane it, but it was very workable ...)
Of course, YMMV.
Regards, JT
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Just take the sawdust from sanding and mix it into a paste with white or yellow glue. It gives you good color matching, which in your case isn't that important since you are painting. However, this is my preferred filler for most times I need a filler and want a close match to the wood I am using. Whenever I empty my belt sander bag, I just empty it into a zip lock bag and keep the sawdust until I need some filler.
Mike Rocket J. Squirrel Elliott wrote:

along.
It's
"Plastic
is
real
with
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