ff's is soft or hard maple preferred.

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On 4/8/2016 2:38 PM, Leon wrote:

I will say that most splitters do not work if you are not making a through cut. A riving knife typically raises and lowers with the blade so it usally never has to be removed unless you are cutting groves or dado's.
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"Leon" wrote in message wrote:

A question about that. I don't have a saw with a riving knife. The ads I have seen for them suggest that since the knife is set a little lower than the blade and moves with it, that it doesn't even have to be removed for dados. Which is correct? John
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On 4/8/2016 5:43 PM, John S wrote:

That is correct.

No, that is not correct, assuming you make dado's the traditional way. For the most part most TS's have 10" blades. Most dado sets are either 6" or 8". The riving knife would stand either 1" or 2" taller than the dado blades.
That said, most modern saws that have riving knives are set for very easy removal and replacement. I personally own a SawStop ICS. It is very easy to remove the riving knife, pull the lever up and remove the knife, replace the knife and push the lever down. AAMOf it is often easier to change blades with the riving blade removed. It is a 2~3 second operation removing and or replacing the riving knife when changing blades.
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On 4/6/2016 9:45 AM, OFWW wrote:

Soft Maple depending on which soft maple has a hardness on the Jenka scale is 700-950. Oak, again on which variety ranges from 1290 for red oak to 1360 on white oak. Hard Sugar maple 1450.
So possibly as much as twice as hard.
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All things considered do you have a preference? For painting and durability?
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On 4/6/2016 8:01 PM, OFWW wrote:

I do. Mine is always soft maple for painting, unless I'm staining/clear coating and looking for some figure.
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Thanks Swingman, I was going to ask you as the bathroom cabinet you did 400 some miles from you was white.
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On 4/6/2016 8:01 PM, OFWW wrote:

Almost with out exception if I am going to paint I use poplar. And it is really soft, 540. From there soft maple.
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Then soft maple it is. I hate to use really good wood where it cannot be seen, but this seems like a nice compromise. It is hard around here to get clear poplar, without the gray streaks, and that stuff bleeds through the white paint even after it is sealed. I used it for some grandchild stuff. With kid safe paint/sealer.
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An article in a recent issue of Woodshop News states soft maple is now outs elling hard. Reasons are as mentioned above...easier on cutting tools and a ccepts finishes better, especially paint. Mind you, this comes from a guy t hat recently bought a sheet of 1/4 maple and couldn't tell you if it was ha rd or soft.
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On 4/6/2016 6:00 AM, BillinGA wrote:

Don't feel lonely. LOL It is very difficult to fell soft from hard on plywood, the outer veneer is not thick enough to provide any resistance to any abrasion of denting.
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Soft, for several reasons: 1. If you're painting it anyway, there's not much point in paying the extra cost for hard maple. 2. Soft maple takes paint better than hard maple. 3. Soft maple is a *lot* easier to cut and mill than hard maple.
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On Wed, 6 Apr 2016 23:22:36 -0000 (UTC), Doug Miller

Hmmm, Thanks for the insight. Matches up with what every one else is saying, and it is just over a buck a board foot less expensive.
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On 4/6/2016 1:14 AM, OFWW wrote:

Soft maple has more color in it. you will see gray streaks, and brown. hard maple is generally very plain (excluding figure of coarse).
the difference is little in one being stronger than the other. Both are pretty hard woods, don't dent easily.
my two cents... I'm sure many will say other things.
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wrote:

Hey, It all adds up. I appreciate all the input from everyone.
I happen to love maple. Although I am starting to like dark wood more.
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A friend and I recently built a Roubo bench. The instructions called for soft maple, but we opted for hard maple for the top. Huge mistake! ...
The hard maple was far harder to machine, both with the table saw and particularly the router. Stick with soft maple and save yourself some grief.
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