festool too expensive for you and feeling lucky

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On 9/20/2015 1:08 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

Quiet is relative.
It is the quietest vac I have ever heard except for maybe the Fein.
I seldom hear the vac when using along with the tool that I am using, be that a corded drill with the Kreg pocket hold jig, track saw, or either sander. The power tool, not the vac, is the dominating sound that you hear. In fact I cannot tell by sound, when using with another tool with it, if it is on low or high suction power. I have to look at the dial. Just used alone to vacuum a surface you can tell by sound whether it is on high or low suction.
For reference, a drill press might be quieter.
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On Sun, 20 Sep 2015 13:31:04 -0500

my relatives are not quiet

the only tool i have that is louder is my planer the other annoying thing about my shop vac is the exhaust comes out of canister handles and is directed downward
i had a bucket of saw dust and the shop vac was next to the bucket instant dust cloud fwiw i use the saw dust in garden mulch
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On 9/21/2015 10:52 AM, Electric Comet wrote:

Is that working for you, the mulch?
My sister was a gardener, kind'a serious at one time. She claimed that the fresh saw dust used as mulch should compost for a while before use. Apparently the fresh sawdust takes nutrients from the soil and other plants if it goes on fresh and has not begun to decompose.
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wrote:

out a bit of lawn with to much fertilizer same idea. Composting with extra green stuff lessens that problem.
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On 9/21/2015 2:34 PM, Markem wrote:

I think it's the opposite. Fresh mulch uses up nitrogen as it decomposes. I believe the reason you want greens included in mulch, like green grass, is it's high in nitrogen. Sawdust, leaves and so on has little nitrogen.
You shouldn't plant anything in compost until it is done decomposing. You can use it as mulch around the top, but not in place of dirt in the root area.
I use sawdust in my compost pile if I have too much. Takes a bit longer to decompose than leaves, but the key is to mix it with green stuff.
--
Jack
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On Mon, 21 Sep 2015 13:28:02 -0500

it is worse than that it can kill off plants if you apply it directly she is right that it has to be mixed into compost and the compost let to go thru the stages so that the ph normalizes and other things but knowing this it can also be applied direct to paths to prevent growth
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Exactly. They rob nitrogen from the plants they are near.
Compost like leaves or with them and once the mold starts to break it down it is ready.
One thing to know - Walnut shavings, sawdust is dangers to a hoofed animal life. It dissolves the hoofs. Best in the trash or a home made fire log.
Martin
On 9/21/2015 1:28 PM, Leon wrote:

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On Mon, 21 Sep 2015 20:49:28 -0500

did not know that about walnut
i would like to make fire logs from sawdust but i do not know how to do that
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I've venture a guess that it involves paraffin wax. Google will tell you enough to get started, you can get the wax from a store like Hobby Lobby. Look for a 40% off coupon before you pay. They can scan the smart phone so there's no need to print it.
Puckdropper
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On 22 Sep 2015 06:16:56 GMT Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

i was thinking along the lines of a hydraulic press
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On Monday, September 21, 2015 at 8:49:34 PM UTC-5, Martin Eastburn wrote:

After reading a lot about the trees that are members of the "juglans" family, I don't sand walnut without a mask, and toss ALL shavings in the garbage. To dangerous when in the form or sawdust or shavings.
For those not up on the subject, here's something to look at:
https://www.google.com/search?q=juglans&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8#q=juglans+poisonous
Robert
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On 9/21/2015 11:52 AM, Electric Comet wrote:

You have a cheap planer. You should get a spiral segmented job, then your ears would only bleed from your shop vac. Then, spend $100 on a Ridged Shop vac, and your ears will stop bleeding altogether. You probably won't hear your cell phone ringing with both running, but that I figure is a bonus...
You can get a spiral segmented job for under 2G's, up to 100's of G's. If you want to impress the world, go for the 100G model, otherwise, Grizzly sells one good enough, if not the best or most expensive ever made.
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On Thu, 24 Sep 2015 14:02:51 -0400

it was/is cheap but it is simple and does work ok

easy spending other people's money

depends who's calling what if i won a festool and miss the call

spending my money again i would love having a quieter planer
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On Sun, 20 Sep 2015 08:49:42 -0500

well it is fun to see the innards of various equipment as for the opinions no big deal everyone has one
i realize now that until i watched the tear-down of that track saw i had never even heard of a track saw so sometimes there really is no such thing as bad press
it is a good idea but not in my budget
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On 9/20/2015 1:19 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

It's not for every one, nor is every Festool tool for me.
Food for thought on the bearings, and I did not watch the video again or much past him commenting on the quality of the armature bearing/bushing on the outer case.
In the automotive industry, vehicles, certainly American vehicles, with manual transmissions use a brass/bronze bushing called a pilot bearing/bushing.
It pressed into the transmission end of the engine crankshaft. The input shaft that comes out of the manual transmission protrudes through the clutch pressure plate, clutch plate, and into that bushing/bearing.
When the vehicle is stopped and the engine is running the bushing/bearing spins around the end of that transmission shaft. While the majority of the time the vehicle is moving it often stops at stop signs, traffic lights, and parking lots. In that instance the bearing/ bushing is spinning around the transmission shaft. These bushings often last for tens of thousands of miles and are often never replaced. Considering mileage and horse power of the average vehicle compared to a Festool track saw and the fact that both the saw and vehicle bearing are pretty much doing the same thing, positioning a spinning shaft with out much of a load I think the Festool bearing will be fine for another 40 years. ;~)
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wrote:

Had an old Ranger, had the clutch replaced they did the pilot bushing trice as the first two squealed like a stuck pig.
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On 9/20/2015 3:04 PM, Markem wrote:

because you have to completely undo/redo every step. I don't recall if you have to remove the pressure plate to get to the pilot bushing. It is back in there 2~4 inches and you are working through a hole that is the diameter of the input shaft. ;~)
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wrote:

it's in use, there is no power being delivered to the wheels.

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On 9/20/2015 5:29 PM, krw wrote:

It simply prevents the clutch plate from weighing down on the input shaft and keeping it centered when the clutch is released. If the input shaft were allowed to settle from the weight of the clutch plate and the clutch plate went slightly off center there would be a heck of a vibration when letting out on the clutch pedal. It has a slight load then the transmission is disengaged by the clutch. The outer input shaft bearing and the pilot bushing carry the weight of the clutch plate and in put shaft when the clutch is released and the pilot bearing continues to spin around the end of the input shaft.
On the saw 99.5 % of the load is carried by the bearings nearest the gears. Those bearings have to be stout but the end cap bearing gets very little load by comparison and why they are not over built. There is not much leverage to apply much force on the end cap bearing.
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wrote:

Sure, but the point being that it's not doing anything unless the clutch is depressed and then there is no energy being transferred so it's not doing much then either

Well, there is a force tangent to the shaft, tending to want to twist the bearings, because the cutting isn't symmetrical. The rear bearing has to take that force. I'm sure it's more than .5%. ;-)
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