Fence left or fence right?

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I find it interesting that no one has mentioned that TS's, at least every one I've seen, are ruled for the rip fence to be on the right. There is no width setting on the other side in most cases. Many saws also are limited on the width of cut you can get on the left side. It's a right-handed world.
Just curious - why hasn't that been noted? Is that no longer the contruction? Unless I'm doing precision work, I just hook the rip fence on, set it to the size I need according to the ruler laid on the bar, and lock it. It's accurate to within a 16th on mine so it works fine in almost all situations.
Personally I think it's more important anyway to be sure your head torso and limbs get minimum exposure to inline with the blade, regardless of sides.
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My saw is a Sears from the 1950's and the fence will go on either side of the blade with an index for each side. Also, extension which include the fence rail can be bolted to either side so you put them where you want.
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"Mortimer Schnerd, RN"

Assuming that the board is exactly 10" wide, this procedure will produce a piece 7-7/8" (or less) wide, depending on the with of the saw kerf.
Prior to ripping, one needs to establish a straight edge that will reference against the fence. The workpiece will also need to have a straight, ie datum or 'face' edge at some stage in anything but rough work.
Hence the fence should be set to 8".
For more info on feeding a circular sawbech - Circular Sawbench Safety - Feeding a Workpiece - might be of some value.
Jeff G
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Jeff Gorman, West Yorkshire, UK
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On 24 Aug 2005 22:35:38 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:
<big snip>

I think that pretty well sums it all up. How you do it has to be what you feel comfortable with, and what your personal preferences are.
Back in the halcyon days of my Navy career ('58-'88) most of the bases had, as part of their recreational facilities, a woodshop that could be used for a small fee. Some were very well equipped, some only minimally, but all had at least one Unisaw.
(As an aside, some of these shops were exceptionally well equipped except for one thing. Not one of them had a jointer!)
There must have been some obscure Navy regulation in effect because without exception all these Unisaws were set up as right tilt/fence left/miter gauge right. On the few occasions that I changed this I was usually chastized by the shop manager.
Now, I'm one of those guys thats mostly right handed but for others I'm a lefty. Using a shovel, or swinging a baseball bat are definitely left-handed operations for me.
This probably explains why I was always extremely uncomfortable using those Unisaws as they were set up.
While caution is always the watchword, my comfort level goes way up when using the left tilt/fence right setup compared to the opposite configuration. To some degree I think this contributes to the overall quality of whatever project is at hand.
As already stated so succinctly by Bridger let your experience and your safety record be your guide, and if you're comfortable with what you're doing then don't worry about how the rest of the world is doing it.
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I posted this question earlier. In (only) three years of being a 'dorker, I don't call ever ripping with the fence to the left of the blade.

80% right, 20% left. Because my saw's peculiar miter slots. And I consequently have significantly more table top to the right.
When I got my Incra 1000SE, I had to disassemble it to set it up for "right slot" work.
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Vic Baron wrote:

For ripping operations I usually keep the fence to the left of the blade because that is where the ruler on the fence is.
For cuts using the miter gauge it depends on the cut.
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