Fein MultiMaster question: (Lew?)


I cross-posted it as I look for my favourite experts in both groups. I'll never do it again... promise.
I have been asked to re and re an eight-foot T&G board (pine/spruce/hart-to-tell) from in behind some serious crown-moulding. The board is 10" wide 1-by. It is split vertically, hence the home-owners desire to replace it with a board salvaged from another part of the house. Removing the old board, up-to where it goes behind the crown-moulding isn't a problem... getting the rest out from behind the moulding, (a combination wood-trim and plaster 6" 45-degree spring angle contraption), is daunting. The proverbial can-o-worms is just waiting for me there.
Here's my question: do I leave a stub of, say..16" then attach a block and whack it downward, hoping the nails will let go via the end-grain or do I try to sneak between two pieces of the assembled crown-moulding with a thin Multimaster blade and cut the board closer to the top, then to slide the new board into the slot. All I need is the 1 1/2" the little moulding allows me to hide the new seam. Will the Multimaster cut 1" thick soft-wood across the grain? The thin-ness of the blades appeal to me more so than the rough-and-tumble saws-all, or even a choice of ryoba or kataba (they don't plunge-cut worth a darn).
Much appreciated. The home-owners are fabulous people. After shooting a laser-plane across one of the floors, I went under the house and drove in a bunch of wedges to elevate the deepest parts up to the laser-line and we decided to accept it as is... no build-ups. (It had been a while since I swung a 10-pound sledge over-head, but the physio has certainly paid off. God bless PT's.
r
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I'm not Lew, but...
(snip of above stuff...)

No problem there. The Multimaster will cut 1" oak across the grain, with the right blade, either as a plunge cut or an open, unconstrained cut. The blade to use is the blue-steel, slightly tapered one that's about 1.5" wide at the business end. Take it slow and watch heat build-up, and you'll be fine. Bring a couple, because if you hit a nail, it's trashed. 3 for $100 at retail shops, but worth every penny if you need it.
"Chip"
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I second that recommendation of the Fein. I use the flush cut blades cross cutting 2x4 PTYP for my deck. I trimmed back the railing stock to be flush with the posts. I was also using the mettal cutting blades for a similar process of cutting nails to remove some misplaced boards on my additon project. The Fein made its cost worthwhile in one day. Marc
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While the MultiMaster is a really pricey tool, it can do some things nothing else can do.
The blades are beyond ridiculous in price but will cut damn near anything. Pine will prsent no problem with the smaller blade.
Do not hit any nails unless you wish to go buy another really expensive blade.
This job was made for the MultiMaster....
Robatoy wrote:

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Another approach to consider and one I've used on my niece's house rehab. I used a Makita right angle drill and a couple of cheap 3/4" Forstner bits to drill out the depth I needed behind some trim when I was installing the French door set I made. You would need 1" bits.
I was going to just use a chisel and chop out the waste (like making a mortise) but then I realized I brought that drill with me and the "cheapo" bits. I did hit some trim nails and it did ruin the bits but a hand-held hacksaw blade made short work of them.
Bob S.
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