Feedback and Further Update

Two-three years ago, we discussed clear coats for outdoor furniture. It wa s proffered whether the base, for oil base house paint, was good or better than dedicated marine or other clear coats. The rationalle: Since house paint is understood to be appropriate for the outside of a house, the base (no pigment added) should work well for outdoor furniture.... it dries clea r.
Two years ago, I experimented with applying the oil base base, no pigment a dded. In the can, it was opague/milky, yet dried clear. It's the coloran t/pigment added, that provides the UV blocking qualities, however, I tried the base, as a clear coating, to see if it would hold up, worked well enoug h, long term. Initially, I used a Spar Urethane and it held up well for 5- 7 years. Two years ago, I stripped and refinished it with the oil base base . Here's the project, Mom's swing, to be hung under an oak tree.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N04/4035599544/
This above oil base base finish did not hold up well, at all. It quickly d eteriorated and turned black, as if the oil solvent biodegraded. Lesson: Do not use an oil base paint base for clear coating outdoor furniture. Als o, it was a pain to strip off, clean and/or prep, for subsequent refinishin g/painting, especially after it had deteriorated/blackened, as it had.
Update: Recently, I decided to paint the swing, rather than clear coat it, again. A landscape architect advised not to paint it white, or it would s tick out like a sore thumb against the natural background. That sounded re asonable. He recommended a dark blue frame and light blue slats. It was p rimed with Zinsser oil base primer. Here's the result, with the following 2 pics: http://www.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N04/9717812768/ I must hav e selected the wrong shades of blue, as these colors are not good for this application/lawn scenario. It looks worse in person, as opposed to the vie w in these pictures. I'll spray paint the swing some light/moderate green color. Lessen: Blue is not the best color for this sort of outdoor furnit ure.
Sonny
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Pick a greyed down green. Fairly dark would look best IMO
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dadiOH
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On Tue, 10 Sep 2013 09:56:18 -0400, dadiOH wrote:

At least one of the paint brands has a "Park Bench Green" that should look right. Sorry, I don't remember which one.
But for sitting on, use an oil based paint. The darker latex paints never seem to completely dry. I've got some book cases painted in the above-mentioned green and even after many years if I leave something heavy sitting on the paint for any length of time it will stick to the paint.
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On 9/10/2013 8:21 AM, Sonny wrote:

I would have tried an epoxy coating followed by spar varnish...
That wood was beautiful, and deserved to be seen.
--
Jeff

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On Tuesday, September 10, 2013 5:08:14 PM UTC-5, woodchucker wrote:

The wood is ER cedar. After hurricanes, I've collected lots of downed tree s and had them milled, so I have lots of cedar and other lumber. Cedar is a nice decorative wood and appropriate for many accent pieces. It's kind o f soft for some/many furniture applications.
I prefer clear coats, to painting, anything. This time, I was looking for an easier job, of it. Turned out to be more work than I bargained for. I could have built a whole new swing in less time, than I've spent on this refinishing.... and I'm still not finished!
I have never used epoxy for wholesale finishing/refinishing. I've used it as a wood filler and/or for strengthening of decayed wood areas on furnitur e framing, that has too many nail/tack holes to properly support further fa stener application.... Upholstering applications, more specifically: Somet imes, an older piece of furniture will have so many nail/tack holes, along a narrow wood framing, that reattaching new fabric is compromised by the pr evious nail/tack holes in the wood. New fasteners don't fasten securely, s o the wood is beefed up with epoxy, when the wood framing can't be wholely replaced with new wood. I've even used epoxy to beef up wood that has been severely perforated by powder post beetles/woodworm.
On the swing, the wood slats were finished individually, before installing. That was time consuming. Applying an epoxy, also, I'm thinking, would ta ke much longer. I'll give epoxy some consideration, next time around.
Thanks. Sonny
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The function of epoxy is to hold stuff together. It does that very well. It would suck as a wood finish for several reasons...
1. It deteriorates rapidly in UV.
2. It would be a bitch to get on and smooth
3. It would be a bitch to get off (see #1 and below). __________________
I once finished all the bright work - trunk cabin, cockpit, dog house - of a 40' sailboat with polyester resin. Not quite the same as epoxy - polyester does UV better - but close enough for this comment.
I thinned it with styrene to a brushable consistency and brushed on 3-4 coats. I then wet sanded it to smooth and flat. After that I buffed it to a high gloss with rubbing compound. All that took a while - a LONG while - but after I finished it was drop dead gorgeous, shown like a diamond in the sun. For about a year; then it started cracking/crazing and I sanded it all off and went back to varnish. That also took a while.
Epoxy would have been less prone to cracking/crazing but it would have deteriorated from the sun's UV. The moral is, don't use epoxy (or polyester out in the weather) as a finish.
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dadiOH
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Blue can be really appropriated. Look at
http://www.pariscotejardin.fr/2010/08/haie-libre-de-gattiliers-dans-le-parc-montsouris-paris-19e/
A lot of gardens in Paris have blue railings.
I must have selected the wrong shades of blue, as these colors are not good for this application/lawn scenario. It looks worse in person, as opposed to the view in these pictures. I'll spray paint the swing some light/moderate green color. Lessen: Blue is not the best color for this sort of outdoor furniture.
Sonny
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On Wednesday, September 11, 2013 2:24:41 AM UTC-5, ck wrote:

That's a better shade of blue, than I selected. I definitely need something darker or, as DadiOH says, grey-green. My sister suggested a grey-green, also.
You know what the real problem is, though? Painting! Nice looking wood should be clear coated.
Sonny
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I agree and there is nothing stopping you from doing that; you just have to be willing to keep it up.
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dadiOH
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wrote:

Fine Woodworking ran an article on outdoor finishes in issue 205.
They tested Watco Exterior Wood Finish, Zar Exterior Poly, Man O' War Spar Varnish, Epifanes Marine Varnish, and Smith & Co. Penetrating Epoxy Sealer under the Epifanes, and had samples sent to several locations around the country to be outdoors for 1 year.
Only the last 2 samples held up in all conditions, and equally so. They concluded the epoxy wasn't necessary. The downside is that it is more costly than other products, and instructions call for 7 thinned coats. I saw a price of $34/quart and up online.
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