FedEx Freight

Page 2 of 3  
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Oddly enough, all three big tools I've mail ordered were AIR FREIGHTED to Bradley Airport, and delivered by EGL, complete with straight truck, pallet jack, and lift gate. The air freight thing always makes me wonder...
I also have experience with other trucking companies, not with power tools, sending 53' trailers for residential delivery.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
B A R R Y wrote:

A few years ago I bought my wife one of those Endless Pools. It comes as a kit and weights about 1500 lbs. There was an optional charge of $50 to have the parts off loaded and placed where I wanted them, which was in the basement. I also requested the delivery be made using a straight truck as I lived at the end of a residential street. Well, the delivery was made using a full size single axle semi. There were two men on the truck and they worked their a's off. I backed my utility trailer down the drive (100') and they loaded the parts on it then unloaded it and took the parts down the basement. Best $50 I ever spent. Of course this was on the back end of a $20,000 swimming pool. Also the best money I ever spent. Nothing like going down stairs, stripping off and jumping in for a swim each night.
Dave Nagel
If any of you guys buy one of these Endless Pools give them my name so I can get the $200 finder's fee. HI HI...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

As John Clarke notes that's SOP. I'm a little surprised at the refusal to use the lift gate, though. Never had that happen. There is usually an extra charge for sending the gear out on a liftgate equipped truck, not for using the damfool gate after arrival at the delivery point. Stupid of FedEx, IMO.
In the good, old days, I used to get gear delivered at the top of my drive (couple tight turns that a semi can't negotiate decently), onto my pick-up. The driver, except for one with a bad back, always helped. That brought him 10 bucks. I built my shop so that a full-sized pick- up could back right up to the sliding doors and drop the load, which means that for anything 500 pounds and down, I could usually at least walk it off. For 500 and up, I called a friend. Usually, anyway. Some machines walk more easily than others, and I equipped the shop with an engine crane (best $150 I EVER spent) and a variety of come-alongs to move the larger iron. I think the worst was a Grizz 24" bandsaw at something like a very tall 750 pounds.
That said, there is NO requirement that a driver touch the material on his truck for most companies. That's a big draw when companies are short of drivers and hiring. No load handling.
Today's driver is usually in a fancy uniform, while these guys were in ratty old khakis or jeans, so maybe that's the real difference.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
M.Paul wrote:

When FedEx delivered my Griz bandsaw (about 5 yr ago), the driver was a cute young woman. She took it off the truck onto a hand truck and refused any help. She took it across the yard and INTO the shop. What a girl!
I have had my lathes delivered to the local home-owned lumber yard saving me the extra $50 for home delivery. The lumber yard owner (a friend) took his fork lift and set the lathe on my trailer and refused any pay. I took his wife my first bowl from the lathe.
--
Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Well, this is certainly one of the stranger whines I have seen here lately. Here's what I read:
" I knowing entered into a written contract after reading it and understanding its contents. My confirmation of understanding its terms and conditions is verified by my signature agreeing to them.
Well... those sorry bastards not only did what they said they would do, but stuck straight to the contract.
They didn't give me anything extra, nor did they operate outside the terms of the signed agreement.
What bunch of sorry asses."
Nitwits like that are the reason people need detailed contracts. To steal from Mark Twain, "folks seem to 'disremeber' the things they want to pretty easy".
Believe it or not, I have a client like that about once a year. For example: "Well Robert, I know you said you and your guys specifically wouldn't do the electrical work and that you would call a licensed electrician if I decided to change the plugs, but how hard is it to change out and those kitchen plugs and convert them to the GFE things you are talking about?"
Using the bizarre logic of the OP, the remind me of how much they are spending with me (on a job I had to use a sharp pencil to get!), and yet want even more free.
Yet as with the last guy that approached me with that, he was stumped at my analogy. He was an accountant. So I said, "If I came in one day and paid off my account as per our agreement for your services, how would you respond if I told you that you should give me two free hours of accounting/tax time simply because I paid my bill?"
I could see the gear grinding, but alas, no answer. Worse, he was now embarrassed so he acted like a prick for a few days.
Sometimes with the old farts I get the old "well, in my day we used to do electrical work with a set of broken pliers, a chipped screwdriver and some bailing wire, and we never burned anything down." I hand them a pair of pliers and s screwdriver; "there's always another chance for you, sir".
I have a friend that has been shuffling freight for many years in the business. He told YEARS ago that simply because there is a gate on the truck, the driver may not be authorized or qualified to use it. And like the poster above that got a tiny package in a huge truck, they have to send the truck at hand or the one that makes the most sense when they are fulfilling their contractual obligations. It is not the responsibility of the company to make sure it makes sense to the guy that gets the package.
Further, the OP shows his ignorance of the business world by never having had the pleasure of being sued. If the driver does something that the company was not contracted to do and there is a problem, who pays? Who pays if the items falls off the lift, the lift malfunctions, etc.?
If the driver doesn't have to push, heave, lift, pry, strain or anything else, chances of injury are small. So no back injuries likely. Shipping is less as less coverage is needed, and only one guy is needed for the delivery.
About four years ago, this same guy bought an entire Jet shop from Amazon. I sat and listened while he organized the delivery. "Who do you guys use? Do they have lifts, are they available? What is box floor height? Can I switch freighters?"
He had all his stuff sent to the DSL distribution point, and sent a "hot shot" moving company out there to retrieve all of it for him. Amazon shipping: free. Burly guys that thought picking up

delivery of same to the driveway next to the garage (shop) door: $175 for his tablesaw, 15" planer, monster dust collector, and 16" bandaw.
I guess none of that matters, though. I am still shaking my head...
...they told me in writing they were going to do something and they did it...
To complain about that is odd indeed.
I should have such luck on a daily basis.
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Reminds me of a boss I had maybe five or six years ago. She asked me to talk another writer out of a deal she'd made with him, because, "it wasn't a contract, just a letter." Ah, the blessings of having leaders with MBAs!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And we shall be blessed even further. Many of these self serving nitwits deem it necessary to procreate, so we will have even more of their offspring among us that don't understand what a contract actually means.
It seems to many these days to simply mean a tacit agreement, molded to their advantage as needed.
What happened to the good old days about being pissed off because someone lied to you and didn't do what they agreed to do?
Man do I feel like a dinosaur.
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Translated into lawyerese: "It was merely a statement of /intent/."
>-(
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

In the solid surface business, shipping is, was, and always will be a nightmare. 30" wide by 12 feet long, on a skid that no ordinary forklifts can handle, unless you have a side-curtain trailer and you can scoop it from the side...which never happens.
So, hand-bombing it is, was, and always will be. At an average of 160 pounds per sheet, those flappy windcatchers sometimes feel a lot heavier. Carrying them 'on the flat' in the summer is a hoot, as the middle of the sheet almost drags the ground and in the winter too risky due to cold/brittle issues. So on their side, we carry them.
To make matters worse, I pay a premium for the 'unused cubes' above my material, as truckers aren't allowed to stack anything on top.
Now, lucky for me, I am serviced by 3 companies who know my needs well enough now to advise their driver, that he better eat his Wheaties before he shows up at my shop with a lift ( 8 sheets) which, including the skid, weighs over 1300 pounds. And a hydraulic platform lift is useless. (Guys with air-ride do drop their trailers.)
NEVER a complaint, as some of the drivers WANT to come to my shop as I often slap the driver a 50 if it is a full skid. I call it grease. Makes the job go better. A 20 if it is only a few sheets. I need these guys, and as granma used tell me, it is easier to catch a bee with sugar than with vinegar.
r
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gerald Ross wrote:

Be aware...
There's FedEx, FedEx Freight, FedEx Ground, and FedEx Custom Critical.
They aren't the same companies. Related, but not the same.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

and Brittany's ex husband aka FedEx.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 8 Aug 2008 12:19:20 -0700, "M.Paul"

From the Grizzly website:
"Truck drivers are subject to a number of regulations, one of which is that they are not required to give assistance unloading. Please be prepared for this "curbside" delivery, as you are responsible for unloading the item(s) and placing them in your shop. This normally takes a couple of "friends". Your location must be tractor-trailer accessible. We recommend that you make arrangements with the trucking company to take delivery at the freight terminal if you can. They will load it onto your vehicle. Make sure your vehicle is capable of handling the weight. Also, bring plenty of tie downs to properly secure the load.
We have a discounted lift program available. Please ask your order taker for more details."
Now, WTF was it about the above that you did not understand?
Regards, Tom.
Thos. J. Watson - Cabinetmaker http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 / tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

After reading the responses, I guess I could understand if the trucking company sent out a truck without a lift gate. I imagine they're in shorter supply than trucks without one. But once it was there, I don't see what the driver gained by not using it. He just guaranteed himself a longer stop and no tip. If it was me, I wouldn't have complained, but it would have given me a chuckle.
todd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

From a retired ABF driver
When ABF is required or requested to employ mechanical loading or unloading devices to accomplish pickup or delivery of freight, an additional charge of $4.50 per 100 pounds of actual weight will be assessed, but not less than $121.65 nor more than $257.15 per shipment per trailer. The charges for this service shall be paid by the party for whom the service is performed. On single line shipments, the charges may be guaranteed by the shipper. At locations where ABF does not maintain suitable equipment and elects to outsource lifting or lowering devices to accomplish pickup or delivery, additional equipment charges incurred by ABF will be collected from the party requesting this service. ABF is not obligated to perform this service where suitable equipment or operators are unavailable, nor at locations inaccessible to our vehicles, or where the safety of our vehicles or personnel is jeopardized. I think you would have gotten off easy with a $50 lift charge.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

As part of my job as a project manager for a millwork company that made store fixtures I negotiated rates with trucking firms for deliveries all over the country.
Although we always tried to use dedicated trailers, there were times when this was not possible, as in shipments to stores that were already open and needed only some replacement pieces.
I was always able to spec LTL shipments with lift gates and driver assistance at rates substantially below the published market rates.
I would suspect that an outfit like Grizzly has agreements with multiple providers about this but the deal has to be made when the truck is ordered, not to be negotiated by the customer once the delivery arrives.
Of course, when there was a problem, a cup of coffee and a dead president went a long way to smooth things over.
Regards, Tom.
Thos. J. Watson - Cabinetmaker http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 / tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I agree. it burns my pies when someone puts the blame on the driver. Most people have no idea the restraints or problems envolved in a typical residential freight delivery. Every delivery is unique. After doing them for more than 25 years, I think I am well qualified. One of the reasons for retirement was that I had had enough of dealing with guys lik the OP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Just out of curiosity, how difficult would it be to unload say a 700 lb tool (we'll say its packaged in a rectangular carton) from the truck to the bed of a pickup? (A full size pickup, not a refrigerator mover.) I think there's a height difference of about a foot, maybe 16". Would some kind of ramp make it that much easier?
I'm not planing to do this any time soon, just asking because I'm curious.
Puckdropper
--
If you're quiet, your teeth never touch your ankles.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

Risky for both man and machine. I've moved heavy boxes by balancing on the edge of a trunk or tailgate and lowering to the ground, then moving it with a two-wheeler. Half of 700 is 350 an d I'm not going to attempt to balance 350 pounds and don't want to be close if it slips down or flips over. Ramp may help, but it has to be secure, not just a leaning board, especially when the pickup bed drops a couple of inches with the added weight.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
SNIP of some pretty precise info

You sound as confused as I am. I don't know how it could be clearer.
This is the guy that necessitates the warnings on paint that says not to ingest it. He is the guy that requires a sticker that says hot soldering irons can cause burns. He is the guy that needs to read the warning on a bag of charcoal to tell him not to barbecue in the house, or heat his house with an open charcoal pit. This is the person that has to be reminded at the propane filling station that open flames or leaking gas could cause explosions.
How long does the cycle of Darwinism take to work again?
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

This is the person who makes you wish they did not put the "do not eat" label on Claymores.
--
--
--John
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.