Feasibility & cost of building a dining room table in 12 woodshop classes

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William Don**ly wrote:

Allow a minimum of 24" per person, 30" to be generous.
Consider width too...don't make it so wide that someone can't reach the center from a seated position, 42-44" is common for rectangular tables. Round tables are often greater than that in diameter, best with a lazy susan appropriately sized.
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dadiOH
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William Don**ly wrote:

As others have said, yes it is feasible. However, a lot depends on how the class is structured.
One question though, why are you taking the class? Is it that you are not confident of your woodworking skills? If that is the case AND the instructor 1) will allow you to pick your own project, 2) does not feel the project is too large for the class (both room wise and length of build time) 3) you are not going to try to get into anything fancy (assumning you are a beginner) it could be done.
A better course of action is to read, hit the videos on Youtube, build a trial project where you can hone your skills and then tackle the larger project - always remembering the following
1) If it does not fit, back off, find out why and remake if necesary 2) When you rush, you screw up 3) It will take longer than you thought 4) It will cost more than you planned 5) In the coming years you will be amazed at both how well you did and how you screwed up.
Go for it, life is too short not to grab on with both hands and shout, "Man, what a ride."
Deb
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Dr. Deb wrote:

I have the skills only because I took woodworking class in high school (all four years) - but then - I became an electronics tech so all the shop equipment I've bought since then has been radically different in character.
I don't have the equipment nor room for the equipment (unless I build a shed): - Table saw (I have a chop saw) - Router table (I have a router & bits, but I never used them) - Band saw (I have a hand held power jig saw & circular saw) - Drill press (I have a hand held power drill and bits) - Disc & belt sander (I have a hand held power belt sander) - Wood clamps (I have your basic foot-long C clamps)
I've been toying with the idea of buying the basic shop tools above but then I'd have to build a powered shed in order to store & use them.
That's why the class seems most intriguing.
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On Mon, 10 Dec 2012 17:49:14 +0000 (UTC), William Don**ly

The class is probably a good idea. You didn't state what area of the country you're in but places like Woodcraft and Rockler (stores that cater to wood workers) offer such courses, too. They have courses targeted a little more specifically, too. In addition, some larger metropolitan areas have a woodworking club or businesses that rent out shop space and tools.
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On Mon, 10 Dec 2012 10:18:13 -0800, "Lew Hodgett"

Your posts of late have shown a vast increase in intelligence compared to what preceded them.
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On 12/9/2012 9:07 PM, William Don**ly wrote:

Probably not unless the classes are all day long, then "maybe" it would be feasible if you know exactly what order to do things and there is no learning curve to operate the equipment.
This is why good quality furniture is not cheap.

Probably least expensive, walnut but relatively soft compared to oak. White Oak would give you a medium brown color and less likely to dent than walnut.

Go to a local furniture store and pick the size you like.
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William,
No, nowhere near long enough. A wood working class will have good quality tools but in limiteed supply. So the table saw will be occupied 99% of the time. Ditto sanders, et c. You don't say how long a class is, or how experienced you are with cabintry but no, this won't happen. Speak to the teacher of the class for a reasonable guesstimate.
Dave M.
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On 12/10/2012 8:09 AM, David L. Martel wrote:

WTF does "cabintry" have to do with building a "dining room table"??
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David L. Martel wrote:

Here is the class description:
Woodworking Techniques 101: This comprehensive 12-session class is a complete course in woodworking techniques. Each 3-hour class covers basic and fundamental woodworking concepts for both the new woodworker & advanced techniques for the experienced craftsman. Lumber may be purchased from the instructor or brought by the student but only new lumber may be used on the school machinery. Each student must choose a project by the third week. Project grading will be based on safety, simplicity, form, and finish. A $25 charge for materials is payable to the instructor at the first meeting.
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On 12/10/2012 12:09 PM, William Don**ly wrote:

Go for it ...
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William Don**ly wrote:

"Swingman" wrote:

It's like chicken soup.
No medicinal value, but hadn't oughta hurt.
Take it, you'll have fun.
Lew
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Bill,
3 hrs. sounds pretty good but that's class time. How much of each class is actually shop time. Remember that you can't run the table saw during lectures. Go talk to the teacher. Go look at the shop. Check out the equipment. Remember that you can't use the pipe clamps if someone else has them. I took a simple wood working course in grade school. Getting enough pipe clamps was a pain. Scheduling time on the mitre box was a pain. I think that was the point of the class. Machine shop class was the same. My grandfather was a carpenter with a basement shop. Doing things in his shop was much easier than doing things in a classroom shop. The $25 shop charge for materials suggest a beginner's class and beginners are slow.
Dave M.
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On Mon, 10 Dec 2012 18:09:51 +0000 (UTC), William Don**ly

No way can you finish a table under those circumstances.
Are you taking the class to learn or just to use the tools? Two weeks are just teaching and probably very little hands on except to run a board through the saw. Now you are down to 30 hours total. Will you be allowed to be ripping your wood while the teacher is showing how to use a hand plane? Will you be able to clamp up your top at the same time a dozen other students are trying to clamp up their TV stand or bookcase? Will Norm be there to put in a brad to hold things together?
Take the class, but find a place where you can rent time on the tools. My guess the teacher won't want you planing your wood in the big planer while he is showing how to sharpen a chisel.
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On 12/9/2012 9:07 PM, William Don**ly wrote:

Yes, but only if each class is a minimum of two to four hours ... toward the latter if you want the table to be something you will be proud of when you're finished.

Not enough information is given to make even a SWAG. Plan on FAS hardwood going from $6 to $9 a board foot in most places these days, so do the math on the high side, plus at least 20% for waste.
If the lessons are worth while, $200 for twelve lesson is a good deal and, depending upon the quality of the instruction, may be well be worth it just for the experience if you don't have any.
Check to see if these folks have photographic or other evidence of what has been accomplished by students in previous classes.
Without that, you stand a good chance of buying a pig in a poke, so it is more than reasonable to ask for references before paying your money.
Good luck with it ... sounds like fun.
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What finish? Walnut's lovely, but open grained, and needs to be filled if you're using a varnish or lacquer. Figured maple looks amazing with a dyed stain such as Transfast, and will be much easier to finish.
For varnish, nothing better than Rockhard (Behlen's). Phenolic resin base, cures tough and easy to rub.

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Edward A. Falk wrote:

I was planning on gluing solid wood together, side by side and not using plywood. At least that's how I would have done it 40 years ago when I was in high school shop class.
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Edward A. Falk wrote:

I remember in my high school woodshop class 40 years ago that we would turn the "U" curves of the grain the opposite way for each board in order to keep it straight over multiple boards.
I was planning on doing the same if that's still the current technique.
Then, I would outline the curved sides, and probably cut those with a band saw.
I'd router the top edge all around.
I'm not sure how to make the center pedestal but I'm likely going to glue pieces together and then turn them on the lathe.
Again, that's how I would have done it 40 years ago - but I'm not sure what changes have been made to shop equipment over the years.
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William Don**ly wrote:

Still the best way IMO. And not that much more expensive. For example, a 4x8 sheet of walnut ply can be had for less than $100. Select, surfaced 4/4 walnut lumber is less than $6/brd.ft so an equivalent amount of would be about $180. However, if your table top is less than 4x8 you won't need an equivalent amount and you won't have part of a plywood sheet left over.
Regarding rounded ends, someone mentioned the necessity of a router compass jig. That's one way of doing it but there is nothing wrong with drawing a line, cutting off with a sabre saw and smoothing the edge with a belt sander. The edge can then be profiled to your liking with a router. The resultant curve may vary slightly from end to end. So what?
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In addition to other comments, I'll add that the project might be physically too large for the class. I took an adult ed furniture refinishing class years ago, and was told that the dining table I wanted to refinish was too big. Not a time constraint as much as a size constraint, as each participant was allotted 1/2 of a 30" x 8' work table. I ended up just doing the leaves.
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