Favorite "classic" tool?

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Okay. New thread.
What is your favorite "classic" tool in the shop? You can interpret "classic" to mean any number of things; I am going to interpret it as meaning "they still make them the same way after 20+ years". But you can interpret it differently if you like.
Mine would be the Porter Cable 505 half-sheet sander. Love it! It is a bullet proof design and I don't think it could be improved much if you tried.
Bob the Tomato
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My favorite classic tool is the tool for the job. We've all at one time tried using the wrong tool, and sometimes it works ok, but more often it doesn't. With the right tool for the job, you're left watching the tool work rather than watching the sweet as it drips into your eyes.
Tried and true, tested for millenia.
Puckdropper
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My favorite is the Yankee #130 push-pull screw driver and it never wears the batteries down. Joe G
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wrote:

Perhaps not quite what you meant, but I get the warmest glow from spending 15 mins restoring some "crappy old" chisel I bought for 50c in a garage sale to a thing of beauty, and scary sharp
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Most of my tools are corded but I feel as if I get a lot of pleasure when I use a old Record Shoulder plane to trim up the tenons and respective shoulders. I have used a few jack planes too with simialr feeling but I know I don't have the patience to develop the skill to use planes more often. Anyway, making a few shavings and seeing the desired results with a plane dictates my choice of the Rec Shoulder plane as my favorite "Classic" tool. Marc

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Without a doubt the hand plane. I am a full fledged Normite that tried a block plane on a whim a few months ago now I have three planes.
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I know it sounds like an attempt at a smart ass answer, but I am serious.
Mine would be the No. 2 pencil. How many of us could work without it for long?
Joe
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Hm... you have a point, but a ball point pen marks wood too. (Well, SOMEONE'S got to be a smart alec.)
I suppose most the marks I make with a pencil could be done with a knife, but they wouldn't show up very well. Ever just dotted a mark and then gone looking for it 30 seconds later? It's that kind of thing.
Puckdropper
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I could. I use a marking knife most often. Sometimes the pencil.
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Probably the one that 90% of the people have and simply take for granted. The Table Saw.
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Personally my favorite is my 50 yo powermatic 66 table saw heavry at hell had to take it down to pieces to move it in my shop but well worth the effort, my grand daughter will be selling this one, I'm the third onwer, both other owners were professional cabinetmakers, I do cabinet work and furniture as a hobby but do sell what I make
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On 24 May 2007 06:51:34 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com"

If it makes it that long. One time I mentioned to my daughter that I'd bought a new blurfl of some sort or other and she rolled her eyes (talk about shit rolling down hill--just like her grandmother...and her father).
I said, "what's the matter? It's all going to wind up with you and your brother, anyway." And she instantly replied, "yeah, biggest ebay sale ever."
So much for handing stuff down.
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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LOL,, They just don't understand.... I can relate, I have a shop full of equipment and my son shows little interest and less interest his mothers 2 sewing machines that cost close to 10K between the two.
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"LRod" wrote:
> I said, "what's the matter? It's all going to wind up with you and > your brother, anyway." And she instantly replied, "yeah, biggest ebay > sale ever." > > So much for handing stuff down.
Leon wrote:
> LOL,, They just don't understand.... I can relate, I have a shop full of > equipment and my son shows little interest and less interest his mothers 2 > sewing machines that cost close to 10K between the two.
A suggestion:
Set up an endowment funded with the contents of your shop to teach industrial arts to the underprivledged in your area.
Would take some work, but should be worth the effort.
Lew
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Being old but not that old, I will probably have to sell all my tools to buy gas before I go. :~) But certainly something to think about.
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Don't worry about the sewing machines. Those electronic jobs don't last that long and, when they break, it's often impossible to get parts. I'll stick with my 1947 and 1960 Singers.

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Leon wrote:

woodworking projects for that kinda loot. I am happy with my $150 Singer walking foot industrial machine circa 1952.
Wayne
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"Leon" wrote in message

Yabbut, your son is too smart to fall for either of those pursuits ... it's a good bet that at some point in the future he will probably own a Fortune 500 company, and you don't get there quilting or building cabinets. :)
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wrote:

Better you see what's coming for your and sell it or give it to someone of your choice. When they sell your stuff, they'll be happy to take a buck and half apiece for your Lie-Nielsen planes They just don't know. Or care.
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12" Starrett combination square.
Previously, I owned cheapies and never really used them. Most frequently I use it as a marking gauge in conjunction with the marking knife, but also as a trisquare and a ruler.
The only improvement that I could see in that tool is the graduation marks: 1/8 & 1/16 one side and 1/32 & 1/64 on the other.
<mini-rant>
IMO no direct-read measuring tool (that is, no manification, like a thickness caliper or a dial indicator) should be graduated in < 1/32. I can interpolate to around .01
IME 1/64 actually harder to read than 1/32 for measurements +/- 1/128.
-Steve

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