Fast Firewood

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Thinking back a number of years. In my area, poplar was being planted to replace what had been harvested. That was the choice because it was one of the quickest growing species.
Two quick thoughts...
1) Birch is supposed to have the highest BTU output when used as firewood. Not sure about poplar. You might want to check that aspect.
2) Local borg charges an arm and a leg for S4S Poplar. Not sure why. I can't imagine trying to stain it. Price is very close to S4S Maple. Might be better off selling it, than burning it...
Pat
wrote:

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As others have stated, poplar is not a good choice. AIUI, osage orange (aka hedge apple, maclura pomifera) has a rapid growth rate and is the best firewood out there. Whether it gets to be usable firewood in a short period, versus a collection of twigs and sticks, I dunno.
Jason
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Does
(aka
As other people have stated and you posted, a pound of wood is a pound of wood. Since cottonwood grows rapidly, producing two pounds of wood in the time it takes a hickory to produce one, by the table you referenced, the nod goes to cottonwood in BTU/annum. This is true regardless of where the wood is located, Mr. Cawthorne, though if you find the leap difficult, pick two species which grow near you for comparison. That's why hybrid poplar, ash and tamarack are planted for rapid pulp and firewood production.
Once again, as other people have posted - that's me, other people - you now have to learn to burn what you have. You can write all the poorly researched articles you want, but if you're burning pine the way you would burn maple, it's chimney fire time. Same with wet wood, where the low heat of the generated steam keeps other volatiles from igniting. Heat is not only in the stick, but the stove. Steppe peoples who have only grass and twigs as fuel hold and trap every bit of heat with thermal mass and baffled smoke passages.
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I used to camp in HedgeRows back in Scouts in Kansas. Osage Orange also has some features which reduce it attractiveness around the campfire. It pop while burning. Maybe OK for stoves but it tends to toss burning crap out of fireplaces. It's tough to cut and tends to dull cutting edges. We used to camp mostly in Oak and Hedge woods. when we went to Colorado, we thought the wood smelled funny while burning.
--
Dana Miller

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