Fast Firewood

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What zone do you live in? In my current neck'o'the woods - among the fastest growers are Aspen and Maple.
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Yabbut, time to grow is inversely proportional to value as firewood. It's all about how much material (not water) goes into the burnable parts. Faster growth=less weight=less BTU when burned.
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wrote:

Hickories 30.8-32.1 Oak: willow, swamp white 29.6-30.8 post, scarlet, swamp chestnut 28.7 chestnut, southern red, white 28.3 northern red, overcup, water 27.0 black 26.1 Locust, black 28.3 Beech 27.4 Maple, sugar 27.0 Elm, rock 27.0 Ash, white 25.7 Walnut, black 23.6 Maple, red 23.2 Sweetgum 22.3 Hackberry 22.1 Pine, yellow 21.8 Cherry, black 21.4 Elm, American 21.4 Sycamore 21.0 Yellow-poplar 18.0 Sassafras 17.5 Cottonwood 17.1 Hemlock 17.1 Willow 16.7 Pine, white 15.0
http://www.state.tn.us/agriculture/forestry /
FAST GROWERS (not in order)
1.)eastern cottonwood Cottonwood is a fast growing tree when it has adequate moisture and often grows as much as 8 feet per year.
2.)silver maple It is a tall, fast-growing tree found on the bottomlands reaching a mature height of 70 to 80 feet and a crown spread of 50 to 60 feet.
3.)green ash Average annual height growth of 12 to 18 inches can be expected under good management.
4.)black walnut This tree grows about 2 to 3 feet per year
5.) Oak, Red (Quercus rubra) A native tree with a height of 60-80+ and width of 40-50. Leaves develop excellent fall colors from orange to red. Growth rate is rapid (fastest of all oaks).
6.) Basswood and 7.) Poplar
8.) "Quick Shade" The Imperial Carolina Imperial Carolina Poplar hybrid. On average and under normal conditions, this tree will grow six feet per year
9.) Weeping willow The willows and poplars typically grow the fastest, up to 8 feet a year, and some of the others grow anywhere from four to ten feet a year
10.)The "Red Baron" Willow Hybrid Tree Under average and normal conditions, the Red baron will grow six feet per year
11.) Willow Hybrid on average and under normal conditions, will grow six feet per year
12.)Sweetgum
13.)Sycamore
14.) Honeylocust Gleditsia triacanthos or thornless honeylocust is fast growing as a young tree and will grow 2' or more a year over a 10 year period
15.)Willow Oak
http://answers.google.com/answers/threadview?id 8432
With a little effort you could graph these out and find the sweet spot.
tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 (webpage)
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Tom,
    That post was a wealth of information, it just got split and filed in my reference catalog.
    Thanks.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ The absence of accidents does not mean the presence of safety
Army General Richard Cody +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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Bah! Not one exotic on there! C'mon! Wouldn't real men burn Zebrawood, Wenge or Mahogany??? Whadda about Ebony! That's gotta make great kindling!
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The other responses are pretty much right on, you're not going to get any usefull firewood in less than 20-30 years. If you are considering poplar, just save your newspapers and burn them, about the same thing. I live in the south and trees grow fast but I wouldn't even consider trying to grow my own firewood. Most National Forest sell firewood permits, 2 cords for $20, but of course you have to cut and haul. The only species I can think of that might come close are Green Ash and Red Maple. Chinese Tallow is considered an invasive species.
Fred
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Hybrid popular is fast growing, but as others have mentioned, its a lousy firewood. Its a little hard to get started, and burns quickly when it does, and does not leave any decent coals.
I've still got most of 2 populars in my woodpile that were planted by my dad. They were 25 years old or so when they were cut down (they were starting to drop limbs and look like crap). They were mature much earlier than that though.
John
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Mon, Feb 7, 2005, 5:55pm (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@swbell.net (SteveW) claims: I need to find a type of tree to plant that will give me good quality firewood in a short amount of time. Someone mentioned Poplar to me. Does anyone have any recommendations?
What's your definition of "good quality", and, "short amount of time"? Depending how you define "short time", you could grow a redwood, then probably only one would be needed. Or, maybe not.
I've read that where mesquite grows, one acre will provide all the firewood you need.
But, if you really want to know. Check nurseries. There's lots of fast growing trees. There's even one type with "berries" that can be gathered for fuel. And/or check with a local college forestry program. That's what I'd do. Then i'd ask my mother. Then I'd ask here.
JOAT Intellectual brilliance is no guarantee against being dead wrong. - David Fasold
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J T wrote:

department. Might find out that they periodically have surplus for sale.
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(SteveW)

Mesquite grows wild in Southern and central Texas. It grows very slooooooow and is a desert tree. Quite scraggy and usually looks like a bush when relative young. It is best used for cooking. You can find pieces of it big enough to build with but it is pretty expensive. I doubt you would want to use it in a fire place. It does burn well and is considered the hardest domestic wood in the US.
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On Tue, 08 Feb 2005 05:14:49 GMT, "Leon"

do so continiously. Mesquite is slow growing and has a very large root syste, so the trees (bushes) usually don't grow thickly.
Darned good thing as that stuff has thorns!
--RC
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad
-- Suzie B
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Depends on where you live. Around here (Pacific Northwest) Alder and Bigleaf Maple grow relatively quickly. Birch is wonderful for firewood and Poplar is the nastiest wood I've ever split. Brian, in Cedar
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Birch is pretty firewood, but it all depends on what the OP is after - a nice fireplace log or a good woodstove log. Birch is pretty much useless in the woodstove, but it does produce some nice looking flames.
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Mike Marlow wrote:

Not true. I consider it the best of the available woods (not that much of it available) here for holding a fire. But in much of the west, the most common native woods burned are Doug fir and ponderosa pine.
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It's interesting to see, as this discussion has opened up, that people from different parts of the country have different views on the same pieces of wood. I'm in the Northeast and birch is not as common by a long shot, as maple and beech and some of the others. It's a wood that a lot of people like to cook over outdoors and like I said, one that a lot of people like for their fireplaces, but other hardwoods are preferred over birch for the most part, around here.
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Mike Marlow wrote:

Absolutely, perceptions are colored by what is available locally. There is a lot of knowledge here of people living in very disparate forest regions. But here is still some Chevy vs. Ford arguments. As another person pointed out, wood gives the same amount of heat (generally) per pound of wood regardless of specie, yet some just won't accept that. However, the amount of heat per pound as Charlie pointed out is only one aspect of burning wood.
Beech may be great, but I believe I have never seen a beech tree and it isn't native in the west and it isn't planted as an ornamental where I live. All one has to do is look a a rainfall map and it will become clear that the native trees will be very different. I like people that talk about Seattle and Portland being very wet and rainy areas, and they are compared to some western areas. However, with annual precipitation of 35" they don't compare to most of the U.S. east of the Mississippi. We hear all the time about 6-12" of rain in less than a week, especially in the southeast. That's 1/3, 1/2, or the total average annual precipitation in many areas west of the Mississippi.
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White birches are a _lot_ lower density than yellow, which is a splendid firewood.
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George wrote:

since yellow birch isn't native to the west. Paper birch is still denser than most confers.
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Some ideas, probably not the best firewood, but it does burn and the trees grow fast:
Fast growing: Chinese elm if it will survive the beetles (there are some beetle-resistant trees out there). Quality of firewood is in the eye of the beholder -- seems to burn reasonably well.
Cottonwood: grows fast, burns pretty fast, doesn't split, so much as "slabs off" when breaking down larger trunks.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ The absence of accidents does not mean the presence of safety
Army General Richard Cody +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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chimney. I know from experience. I loaded my stove one night and closed the dampers so it would burn slow and last all night. The next morning cresote had formed on the door and was running out the door. It looked like tar.
Virgle
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