Fast Firewood

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I need to find a type of tree to plant that will give me good quality firewood in a short amount of time. Someone mentioned Poplar to me. Does anyone have any recommendations?
Thanks
Steve
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The faster the tree grown, the less dense it is and the less quality the firewood. Most trees would take 20 to 40 years to be worthwhile. Plant now for your grandchildren.
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How about trying rec.firewood

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How about taking up woodworking as a hobby. In the beginning you will make plenty of firewood.
Joe in Denver my woodworking website: http://www.the-wildings.com/shop /

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SteveW asks:

Poplar is lousy firewood, whether hybrid, tulip or popple types. The only fast growing hardwood I know of that MIGHT make semi-decent firewood in a few years is pin oak. I've got a couple pin oaks that have grown at an incredible pace for the past 15 years. Another year or two, and they'd make decent firewood. If you expect trees to produce anything in much less time than that, you're looking at cordwood and pulpwood.
Charlie Self "I think we agree, the past is over." George W. Bush
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I have a pin oak that I cut down to make room for a pool. It doesn't burn well at all. On the other hand, my walnut cut offs burn beautifully.... the most fantastic no hassle burn... But it is too nice a wood to burn.... use the wood, burn the discards.
Charlie Self wrote:

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Hybrid poplars, ash, and tamarack are all used for that purpose. Depending on the type of stove, they'll give you usable wood in 10 years. Note, however, that a pound of wood is equal in BTU to a pound of wood. Aspen .40 sg, beech .68.
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Hickory Maple, Ash. They grow relatively quickly for hardwood.
SteveW wrote:

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Will
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in there? :-)
Anyway... hickory is *not* a particularly fast-growing tree; neither are most maple species, and the ones that *do* grow fast make poor firewood; and the same is true of ash -- it's "fast growing" only when compared to oaks.
Bottom line: the OP is not thinking realistically. *No* tree that he plants is going to grow to firewood size in a short time like he wants.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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I dunno, but I bet it's pretty but a bitch to work with.

Right. I've got several thousand Ash trees that are now 8 or so years old (I'd have to check). Nice & straight, but they're only 1-2 inches in diameter. My kid, or grandkids, will be able to harvest them.

Right. For me, the best way to get firewood has been to drive around with a truck, trailer, friend, and chainsaws, after ice storms. knock-knock "Hi, I see you have a tree down in your yard/across your driveway/on your car/etc. Would you like me to remove it, pile the brush by the road/in a pile, and haul away the firewood in exchange?" Works about half the places you ask.
I burned wood from a 1993 ice storm for about 6 years, without touching a single tree of my own. Also, if you let locals know you'll take down (easy) trees in exchange for the wood, you can cut all day, every day if you want.
Dave Hinz
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Snip

Maybe if you water the trees they will grow faster. I watched all the Ash trees in my neighborhood being planted when the subdivision was brand new. Those trees had 1" diameter trunks and had trunks 12" in diameter 10 year later. I have a 10 year old Live Oak with a 10" diameter trunk.
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Yeahbut in his woods, even with a well thinned woods, the trees are still competing for nutrients and for sunlight. Lawn trees don't face this trial. Trees in the woods tend to grow taller as they search for the sun.
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Exactly, that too. I was under the impression that the OP would possibly grow trees for firewood and would probably put some effort into planting correctly. Using a setting like Dave mentioned was not a good example of how fast an Ash tree would grow for this purpose.
Lawn trees don't face this trial.

I have a 5 year old Live Oak in my back yard with a trunk that is 5" in diameter. The tree came up naturally in a crowded spot. Crowded by a fence, shrubs, and 12' tall bushes on the other side of the fence. Plus the Live Oak is coming up under an old Mulberry tree. Since it came up from a seed 5 years ago it grew straight up. Last fall I took the Mulberry tree out so that the Live oak can begin spreading out. The lowest limb is about 10' from the ground and the tree stands about 20 tall.
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Holy Cow Dave! 6 years on a wood pile? Where the hell did you stack this wood to protect it well enough to last 6 years? That's some longevity for a pile of firewood.
I do agree with what I snipped from your post though. There's a ton of wood out there to be had for free. Storm damage, deadfall (10 acres of woods will provide enough deadfall to provide most homes with casual use firewood every year), and best of all - follow the loggers around. Most aren't bothering with firewood much anymore because the market isn't big enough anymore to warrant the effort. Landowners don't like the tops just left out in the woods the way loggers like to do and they'll often gladly let you clean up the mess. Free firewood - don't get much better than that unless you can actually get someone else to put it up for you.
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No kidding. He musta had it all pressure treated. LOL
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Some of these might work, but I have no idea how they burn...
<http://www.jmbamboo.com/giants.htm
djb
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On Mon, 07 Feb 2005 17:36:57 -0600, Dave Balderstone

They burn terribly. Those stems are hollow and the quality of the wood makes them very poor firewood. They are, however, fast growing under the right conditions, very strong and you you need posts or beams for a construction project . . .
--RC (who currently grows three species in his back yard.)
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad
-- Suzie B
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Left out a comma. TOIEG (There's one in every group.) However, if you do find a hybrid -- post a picture of the wood..
I thought he said he wanted fast growing hardwood. For Hard wood those trees DO grow fast. :-) Couple hundred years and you have great trees -- now take western red cedar - that takes a while to reach maturity -- few hundred years or so (a couple of millenia or so and it's reasonably large). Now that is slowooooowwww.
Doug Miller wrote:

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Will
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Sorry about that, just couldn't resist. :-)

Actually, he said he wanted good quality firewood "in a short amount of time". The only way that's gonna happen is to cut down a tree that's already been growing for a long amount of time. By human standards, anyway -- as I pointed out to the OP, thirty years is a short time, to a tree.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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Will wrote:

Whoa. Let's not exaggerate too much. I lived where there were western red cedar. They are relatively fast growing and require lots of moisture. Don't believe I ever saw a 200 year old one except in a reserve. A 2-foot diameter cedar on our place was usually at most 80 years old and likely much younger and would have a lot of rot. Since the place was logged in the 30's, most of the large trees I saw had to be no more than 60 years old. Damn few trees (individuals) of any kind (and certainly not Western Red Cedar) live a couple of millenia.
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