FAQ?


Does this newsgroup have a FAQ? Is this the place to talk about restoring old wood tools?
Bill B.
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It's in the archives: <http://groups.google.com/group/rec.woodworking/search?group=rec.woodwor king&qQ&qt_g=1&searchnow=Search+this+group>

You bet.
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Dave Balderstone wrote:

Thank you, much obliged.
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We'll take all the on-topic threads we can get, Bill.
;-)
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Bill Braun wrote...

Lotsa good stuff on the porch. (I.e., you should also check out the oldtools mailing list):
http://www.brendlers.net/oldtools/oldtools.html
Jim
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I was just reading the home wiring portion of this FAQ, and came across this item (If this has already been dealt with in the group, pardon my reiteration):
Subject: Testing grounding conductors and grounding electrodes. Snip... Testing a grounding electrode is a somewhat different matter.     The codes aim for a dirt-to-electrode resistance of 25 ohms or     better. One moderately safe way is:
        - turn off the main panel         - turn off all of the breakers         - disconnect the grounding electrode from the rest of          the system. (often just a bolt in the panel)         - connect a 5A fuse between the output of one 15A breaker          and the grounding electrode. (use a 5A automotive fuse          in a pigtail holder)         - turn on the main breaker and the single breaker connected          to the 5A fuse.         - if the 5A fuse blows, your ground is good.
From my understanding of electronics, the 5 amp automotive fuse is rated for 5amps Direct Current (DC). If you are attempting to use it where a 5amp Alternating Current (AC) fuse is called for, the automotive fuse will be wrongly rated. Now, some of you may say that amps are amps, but in DC current you are dealing with pure resistance. In AC current you have reactance, which is not pure resistance as in DC. This is why you will see a different size fuze element between 'equally' rated AC and DC fuzes. In addition, fuzes are rated for temperature so you can have a slow blow or quick blow fuze and should use the correct one for any particular application, including testing.
Just my .02 cents...
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rec.woodworking FAQ, updated version: http://www.robson.org/woodfaq/index.html micro-FAQ on wood: http://www.diyprojects.info/bb/ftopic1115.html
cheers, diy_man
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