Face frame question + Sketchup question

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Now how to draw. Draw flat and everything. Do not make any of this as component yet. Make a complete copy and move to the side. Erase every thing in the first drawing that is not the rails. Go to the second complete drawing and erase everything that are not stiles. The ark on the stiles should remain. Now make everything into components and put the pieces together.
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Just a hint here, non component lines in a drawing do not move well, they stick to other lines. BUT those lines copy perfectly..
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On Monday, July 27, 2015 at 4:15:11 PM UTC-5, Greg Guarino wrote:

With a 36' (432") radius, and the chord is 2.5", the angle would be .331 degrees and the distance from the chord to the top of the arc is .00181". http://www.cleavebooks.co.uk/scol/calsect.htm
Might as well cut the tops of the stiles straight across.
Sonny
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On 7/27/2015 4:51 PM, Sonny wrote:

While this will work but will leave a gap, small one, it will not be a strong joint, touching in only two points. Additionally at precisely what angle will you cut?
It is probably going to be just as easy to cut the matching ark on the stiles using a flush trim router bit and using the ark on the rail as the guide.
Something to also consider with a 36' radius I doubt he is going to get a perfect ark unless he uses his router on the end of a 36' long string, and then placement of the rail will be critical. ;~)
Better to print the pattern, glue to the rail, cut close to the drawing ark, and then sand smooth to the line. Remove the paper pattern. The ark will not be perfect but if you use the ark on the rail to guide the flush cut bit it will be a perfect match.
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I'd probably dry fit it and see how tight the joint looked, and then take a pass or two with a block plane to make the stile fit if it needed it.
Now, if you wanted to get fancy, instead of tenoning the stiles into the rails, you could rabbet the rails and fit the stiles with a bridle joint, making it a decorative element. Perhaps make the stiles thicker than the rails so they stood a little proud or maybe routing a bead or something along the edges. That would hide the lower joint, and making the top flush would be easy.
(I saw pictures of a piece done that way somewhere, thought it was a neat technique)
John
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On 7/27/2015 4:15 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Ok, one more example of using the top arc on the rail as a template to guide the top bearing flush cut router bit. I had a variable arc curve MDF template that I clamped to the cutting boards and cut a 1/4" deep grove in the cutting board. Then band sawed down the middle of the grove to separate the halves. Then removed the remainder using the existing original grove to guide the bit to remove the remaining waste. The strips you see go all the way through the boards and for each group of strips I cut the cutting board again.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/15897346730/in/dateposted-public/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/16083922712/in/dateposted-public/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/15878452279/in/dateposted-public/
So...... this method does work if you want a perfect fit. ;~)
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On 7/27/2015 4:15 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

OK! Nevermind. My suggestion will NOT work well.
The arc on the stile will end up with a radius that is 1/2" shorter than the 36' radius on the rail/pattern. Assuming you use a 1/2" flush cut bit.
There will be a gap unless you put a 1/2" strip between the rail and the stile, again assuming you use a 1/2" bit.
Hope this was not too late.
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On 7/27/2015 4:15 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Not difficult at all to make a jig to route the exact arch in the top of the stile.
You still want the joinery to fit perfectly, both for aesthetics, strength, and peace of mind.
Think JIG ... and use SU to your advantage:
Print, to scale, a template of the top curve of the part, which you can then use to both paste on the top of the stiles for the rough cut, and for making a simple router jig(s) to make the precision fit.
Since you are working on end grain of the stile, build a backup piece into the jig to mitigate tear out.
Just one, of many ways, to skin that cat. But doing it in such a manner that is is both pleasing and structurally sound makes you feel better in the long run.
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