FA: Rockwell 4692 Porta Plane


Rockwell 4692 Porta Planer http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&itemu55070953&ssPageName=STRK:MESE:IT
Includes:
a.. Metal storage/carrying case b.. Rockwell 4692 Porta Plane with owner's manual c.. Sharpening attachment and ancillary items with user manual
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wrote:

What's it for?
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Think of it as a hand held jointer. It is primarily used for planing the edge of boards or doors. It can also be used to bevel an edge.
Randy
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wrote:

And this claims to be a precision tool, does it?
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I'm not crazy about supporting anything about advertising, especially ebay stuff, but the tool is an excellent tool owned by about every wood door hanger in the country. Precision in the hands of an experienced craftsman.
(top posted for your convenience) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net
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I like that. I'm going to implement that in my postings. It perfectly illustrates why top posting so often makes sense. Ought to really drive the netKops nuts. Of course if the netwits would learn to edit, there wouldn't be any debate.

--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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Nah, doesn't drive me nuts...the killfile is only two keystrokes away.
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it's as close to a precision tool as you'll get in a handheld machine. it's a high quality tool.
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Hm, I have one, and have used it exactly twice. Didn't care for the results either time. Any hints for using one of these to, say, shave down a sticking door?
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planing a sticking door is often a mistake. before you get out the plane, make sure that the hinges are tight and set right and that the jamb is square. if it still sticks, mark out where and how much and take the door down and pull all of the hardware. generally you'll be planing the hinge side. set the plane for a light cut and sneak up on your line.
make sure that you have a good grasp of the door geometry, including bevels.
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Well, it's welded steel in a cement block wall (at my kids' school), so if it's not, I don't have a lot of options to fix that.

Ah, hadn't thought of cutting it on that side. Why there, rather than the side that's actually hitting?

I'm good with the bevels, but far as I know, the rest of it is...uncomplicated. Or, is there something subtle going on?
Dave Hinz
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assuming that the building hasn't settled, warping the frame. if that has happened, planing the door might be your only option. but it might not, too. if the casing is removeable, check to see if the jamb can be adjusted. but first check the jamb for plumb and level- if the wall is sound, don't mess with the jamb.

the lockset is the hardest thing on a door to move. if you plane the strike edge, you'll have to reset the lockset.
sticking doors are usually caused by sagging on the hinges. sometimes the screws have worked loose, sometimes it's from wear on the hinge itself- is it a high traffic door, old and heavy? sometimes on a frame and panel door the rail and stile jointery loosens and the door sags on itself.
open the door to about 90 degrees and stand at the strike edge with your toes on either side of the edge of it. grab one knob in each hand and apply lift. if the door is sagging on the hinges you'll see movement and whether it's the door leaf, the jamb leaf or both that are loose.
with the door closed, slip a business card in the gap and slide it all of the way around the door. this will tell you exactly where it's binding.

there are a lot of places where a door hang can go bad, and usually you'll run into a combination of several.
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No cracks, anywhere in the school, in the concrete block walls, so I don't think anything has moved.

Right.

So I should take a full swipe then rather than just where it's bearing, I take it?

6th grade classroom in a,...40 year old school building. I've got that box of hinges...maybe pull a pin and see how that looks then.

This one is a solid-core door with a window, in a steel frame. So the hinges make the most sense now that you bring that up.

That, I can tell from the scrape marks ;)

Sounds like fun.
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probably you shouldn't be planing the door. but if what the door needs is to be a fraction narrower but parallel, that's where you'd do it.

the pin can wear but so can the knuckle.

the card will also tell you where the gap is too big, if you wiggle it a bit as it goes. finding the spots where the door is pulling away from the jamb can be the clue you need.
think about the effect of gravity on the door. generally it will be trying to rotate around the hinges, so it will try to bind at the floor on the hinge side and at the top at the strike side. then think about how to move the door back up into place. taking wood off is rarely the right thing to do.

it kind of can be.
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