Exterior wood protection?

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Before it gets too cold I would like to get at least some paint on all the exterior wood I've put up: pressure treated fencing, T1-11 gates, plywood planters (approx 1.5 x 1 x 3').
As far as paint (water based) goes, I heard that exterior gloss is the best, followed by semi-gloss, then flat. Still true?
I read that polyurethane (water based) was not suitable for outside, which never made sense to me. Is this true?
Recently here, someone made reference to wood stains not providing much wood protection. If I use stain, what clear coating can I put over the stain, that will do a good job?
Are "water seals" (the proverbial Thompsons, which I understand is middling in effectiveness) generally clear? Can one mix stain in with them? What is regarded as a better seal, that is generally available?
For non-staining apps, I have tons of exta paint lying around. Is it OK to use any ole paint as a primer, without compromising the final coat? iyr, I kluged together a paint sprayer/pressure pot deal, which worked great on a T1-11 gate. I will be using this sprayer as much as possible. More on my Sprayer Saga in another post.
I heard of something called "edge primer", for the ends, edges of wood. Worthwhile? Good for non-edges?
For the plywood planters, I have some Frontier fibre roof coating, which is like a paintable tar, close to the viscosity of paint. This was recommended by some gardening sources. Should I prime the planters with regular paint before applying this roof coating?
Any advice, tips, experiences, war stories would be helpful.
--
EA




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On 10/16/2012 10:11 AM, Existential Angst wrote:

The more gloss the longer it looks fresh, the duller the finish the quicker it looks chalky. I would say that noen is better than the other as far as protection.

No! Unless you are painting in the rain. I have been using exterior polyurethane based paint for years with great results.

The above mention will not last as long as a good paint. The more opaque the finish the better the protection.

Not sure if you can mix but it will be a 1~3 year repeat.

What is your time worth? You are painting something that is going to be in a harsh environment. No time to pinch pennies IMHO, buy new paint and use the recommended primer.

You especially want to prime/paint the edges and in particular those near the ground where water will splash or morning dew will collect.

Have you read the directions or asked those that recommended the product?
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Gloss shows flaws more than a semi-gloss, and a LOT more than satin. Personally, I dislike gloss very much.
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This topic is explored by Consumers' Reports every two years or so, when it usually provides encyclopaedic data. Factors include: -- local weather -- horizontal or vertical surfaces (floors and table tops vs. walls) -- finish (smoothness, visible metal fasteners etc.) -- paint or stain?

Anomaly: most stains are not designed to accept a clear topcoat. (This is usual only indoors or with auto paints.)

Timber waterproofing products are secondary to drainage, i.e. design so that water runs off rather than puddles, and availability of drying winds.
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Carlsbad Springs
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On 10/16/2012 10:11 AM, Existential Angst wrote:

Yep.
Water based? Outside? There is sometimes water outside, you know?

Stains are just a thin color layer. They don't protect the wood from anything.
What do you want to protect it from? Any nicks or hard wear will eventually grind through the stain.
Instead of stain use the wood you want it to look like. Now you are protecting wood.

ehh. pass

no
You first?
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On 10/16/2012 3:31 PM, Richard wrote:

You realize that once water based paints cure that it is no longer as susceptible to moisture? And or that most homes exteriors are painted with water base.
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On Tue, 16 Oct 2012 11:11:53 -0400, "Existential Angst"

I already forgot about exterior paint. Here's my tip on that. Let any exterior wood rot away and replace with new wood to rot away. Use cedar if you can. Lasts longer and looks good natural. Or plastic that doesn't rot. For expensive-to-replace and must-look-painted stuff on the house, have it clad with aluminum or plastic. Exterior painting - except for bridges - is stone-age.
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On 10/16/2012 3:36 PM, Vic Smith wrote:

Do you live in Arkansas?
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*I have personally found that for exterior painting of new wood, it is best to start with an oil based primer. After that you can put whatever color latex finish on that you want after letting the oil primer dry for a few days.
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"Existential Angst" wrote in message
Before it gets too cold I would like to get at least some paint on all the exterior wood I've put up: pressure treated fencing, T1-11 gates, plywood planters (approx 1.5 x 1 x 3').
As far as paint (water based) goes, I heard that exterior gloss is the best, followed by semi-gloss, then flat. Still true?
I read that polyurethane (water based) was not suitable for outside, which never made sense to me. Is this true?
Recently here, someone made reference to wood stains not providing much wood protection. If I use stain, what clear coating can I put over the stain, that will do a good job?
Are "water seals" (the proverbial Thompsons, which I understand is middling in effectiveness) generally clear? Can one mix stain in with them? What is regarded as a better seal, that is generally available?
For non-staining apps, I have tons of exta paint lying around. Is it OK to use any ole paint as a primer, without compromising the final coat? iyr, I kluged together a paint sprayer/pressure pot deal, which worked great on a T1-11 gate. I will be using this sprayer as much as possible. More on my Sprayer Saga in another post.
I heard of something called "edge primer", for the ends, edges of wood. Worthwhile? Good for non-edges?
For the plywood planters, I have some Frontier fibre roof coating, which is like a paintable tar, close to the viscosity of paint. This was recommended by some gardening sources. Should I prime the planters with regular paint before applying this roof coating?
Any advice, tips, experiences, war stories would be helpful.
--
EA


My over 10 year old shed with T-1-11 siding and pine trim, with shutters and
windows made from pine still looks good after using oil based primer and two
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On Tuesday, October 16, 2012 9:47:29 PM UTC-5, BobS wrote:

In 1990, I rebuilt my attached garage, using T1-11 on the east and south sides. Primed with Zinsser oil primer and painted with *Sears Weatherbeater house paint. I repainted these areas about 7 yrs ago, then a hurricane came through and blown-off tree limbs hit the east side, had to repaint that east side. Still looks good.
My shop has T1-11 siding, primed & painted as my garage. I used a 3/4" roller for priming & painting shop and garage. The thick nap allowed getting into the T1-11 grooves, first primer coat thinned for penetration. Once rolled on, I used a 4" brush as "dressing", smoothening. The shop remodel is ongoing, when I have time & help, and here are a few pics dating back to the beginning, in 2006. http://www.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N04/4033313690/in/set-72157630986052728
*Our local Sears doesn't have a paint department anymore, so the garage part of the shop has Valspar (semi-gloss), rather than Sears Weatherbeater.
I'm in south Louisiana, if that makes any difference. Sonny
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On 10/18/2012 3:11 PM, Sonny wrote:

A bit of heaven, in heaven ... you done good, cher!
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I agree. Not only did he do good, but he recycled and old house in disrepair and turned it into a first class shop. And I assume that it cost a lot less than new construction. Recycling taken to a whole new level.
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On Thursday, October 18, 2012 8:40:07 PM UTC-5, Lee Michaels wrote:

I've enjoyed remodeling this old house. And speaking of recycling, somewhat more on that story: After my mild stroke in 2002, insurance paid for my rehab, which included my going back to school in upholstery.... something to further help me get my strength & coordination and speech back, rather than a formal physical therapy program.
During my free time, I would drive to River Ranch, a high end subdivision being build, and dumpster dive for framing lumber, ply products, anything for the shop remodel. Lots of supplies to be had during 3-5 months of collecting.
Several of the contractors were aware of my shop project and assisted with my collecting of supplies. Rather than tossing stuff into the dumpster, they would put it along side the dumpster, for my easier collecting; placing non-scrap items there; at times, even helping me load stuff. One contrator told me he'd be working at such & such location, next week, so come by there, also.
The shop roof has a "new" layer of decking over the old. All the new or added framing came from framing stock collected. Several rolls/partial rolls of Tyvek were collected & used. Electrical boxes, wire nuts, and other assortment small items, as such, was collected. Almost all of the shop cabinets, seen in the pics, are build with the salvaged ply products and such. A new/in package 12" saw blade for my RAS. New, in package, pre-primed, several sets of interior door and window casings someone decided were not to be used. Rolls of that rubberized stickum door and window sealant tape (I don't know the proper name of that stuff). That large 4' X 9' garage window was salvaged. All sorts of supplies were collected.
I had lots of free time for my salvaging efforts, back then. The more I did, the more efficient I became, at it. It was profitable and the salvage work furthered my physical rehab, as well. And, notably, I enjoyed visiting with all those construction folks, also.
Sonny
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Most contractors around these parts hate to see stuff going into the dumpster and would rather give excess away. I'm pretty good at estimating material but sometimes I get fooled. I have a siding crew working on back to back jobs right now and I swear they can cover two squares of house with one square of siding ... I stop by, the house is almost covered, and the pile of siding seems bigger than when I left earlier. Even though I'm going to have to eat the surplus, I try to make it count for the good instead of going into a dumpster and much prefer to see someone get some use out of it ... can't even add up what we give to Habitat for Humanity on a yearly basis.
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On 10/19/2012 10:49 PM, Swingman wrote:

Are you using the "colored" siding again or the regular primed siding?
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On 10/20/2012 10:53 AM, Leon wrote:

James Hardie ColorPlus, both homeower's used the same color. You will probably understand the dynamics of that more than I. :)
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On 10/20/2012 1:41 PM, Swingman wrote:

Well for one, Bob/Susan are not to be out done by Jim/Diane.
Did you go inside to see my kitchen, at Bob/Susan's house?
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On 10/20/2012 2:07 PM, Leon wrote:> On 10/20/2012 1:41 PM, Swingman wrote: >> On 10/20/2012 10:53 AM, Leon wrote: >>> Are you using the "colored" siding again or the regular primed siding? >> >> James Hardie ColorPlus, both homeower's used the same color. You will >> probably understand the dynamics of that more than I. :) >> > > > Well for one, Bob/Susan are not to be out done by Jim/Diane. > > Did you go inside to see my kitchen, at Bob/Susan's house?
Hell yeah ... I was going to mention it, but they offered first.
Beautiful work, as usual!!
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On 10/20/2012 2:10 PM, Swingman wrote:

Thank you
Can you believe this is all that I charged!
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