Exterior shutters, Anderson Bay Window?

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Sonny wrote:

Thinking out loud here, I wonder if I can just buy some window screen frame kits and install any screening fabric I want?
--Winston
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Simple frame with full lap joints at the corners. You have a bandsaw. Staple or tack the fabric on and apply a small trim molding to hide the staple line. Prior to fabric application, paint the frames and trim to match your home decor/color.
Sonny
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Sonny wrote:

OK!
Thanks.
--Winston
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On Sun, 26 Aug 2012 08:12:34 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@bigbrother.net"

That won't cool the frame, though. One of the reasons I suggested the long and large rollup is that it'll keep the window and wall behind it cool, too.
I'll be using this on a screen porch I'm building for a client next week. I got 80% of the framing done Friday and will finish it up on Weds when the screening finally gets here. It was supposed to be in stock at Homey's Despot but wasn't. ($79 v. $159 at Screeneze) http://screeneze.com /
-- "Bother", said Pooh, as he chambered another round...
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Larry Jaques wrote:
(...)

Ah copy that Houston.

Pretty cool!
--Winston
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On Sun, 26 Aug 2012 19:15:44 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@bigbrother.net"

'Taint rocket surgery, mon.

I'm hoping so. One of my thoughts is to get some and put it up around my back porch. In the summer, it gets screen fabric. In the winter, visqueen. That would facilitate more civilized barbeques in the winter. It's $2.07 l/f.
-- The human brain is unique in that it is the only container of which it can be said that the more you put into it, the more it will hold. -- Glenn Doman
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Larry Jaques wrote:
(...)

Earlier would be better, yes.
(...)

Ah 20-20 hindsight. :)

Well, heck. I didn't even know these existed. http://www.blinds.com/control/product/productID,89493 #
That may be just the thing. Thanks!

Gotta be on the outside. It's 'game over' if the solar energy gets through the glass.
(...)

I like it. $153 gets me shades for all three panes. Thanks!

A triumph of functionality *and* style.
Thanks!
--Winnie
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On Sun, 26 Aug 2012 08:10:24 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@bigbrother.net"

I researched all the items available (online) before purchasing new doublt-pane windows for my house, choosing low-E for their sunstopping strength.

I thought one would be sufficient, allowing you to see uninhibited views out the sides at the same time. <shrug>

I *knew* you'd like it, and figured it'd fit right in there in San Josey, Wales.
-- "Bother", said Pooh, as he chambered another round...
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Larry Jaques wrote:
(...)

One in the center would *help* no doubt. It's only 33% of the area, though.
Three's about a minimum to justify the time, IMHO.
I am not at all concerned with the view of my plastic outside shed. :)

There is a certain liberation in being old and realizing that *no one* cares what I'm wearing, as long as my torso is covered.
:)
--Winston
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On Sun, 26 Aug 2012 09:09:39 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@bigbrother.net"

Oy vay! Denseness doesn't help, sir. <tap, tap, anyone home?>
OK, you have a 4' wide center window and two 2' wide wrap-arounds (@ 45 degrees) which bring the OAL to maybe 7', right? If you install a 7' or 8' long shade, it will shade all 3 windows from the sun--if the sun is at 90 degrees to the west-facing window. (Simply offset it to one side if it doesn't.) And if you get one which is 6' tall, it will shade more of the wall, too, adding to your comfort.

Erm, that's nice.
P.S: What did you finally do with the redo of your flag driveway last year? IIRC, you were having loads of trouble finding laborers or contractors willing to do it for you.
-- "Bother", said Pooh, as he chambered another round...
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Ah but area is a big deal when discussing solar energy, yes?

Whoa, big fella. Three windows, each equal sizes (22" W x 46" H).

Gotcha. I agree that is an efficient approach. 'Tis a microscopic back yard though. A shade big enough to work properly would be really out of scale for the (remaining) space.
SWMBO says that she will sign off on the aesthetics of exterior shades, but she agrees we don't have sufficient room for an awning.

It was an entry porch landing. Very much smaller than a driveway. I took a picture of the layout and removed each of the pavers. Placed them 'in position' on a series of custom modified pallets and stacked the pallets using my micro forklift. (My hydraulic cart in drag.)
Unloaded a couple bags of base sand and packed it into the sunken area until it wouldn't pack any more. Used a couple pieces of conduit and a custom made gauge to level the sand at the proper height WRT the edge pavers. Removed conduit. Smacked the leveled sand down with a square packing tool and rechecked level. Placed each pallet of pavers back in position and used a BFRM* to microscopically adjust edge height. Applied polymeric paver set sand to lock them all together. It looks and works a whole lot better now. Discovered what work must be like in the process. Whoa.
*BF Rubber Mallet
--Winston
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On Sun, 26 Aug 2012 19:14:25 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@bigbrother.net"

Oops, I guess I misread it. That's the normal size I see, though. 2/4/2, 2/6/2, 2/8/2, just enough for a seat.

As you said, who cares what the shed (or back yard) looks like?

Bueno.
Yeah, which is why I want back OUT of the handyman business. It's killin' me.

Grok that. Be cautious with one on flagstone. They break very easily. DAMHIKT.
-- The human brain is unique in that it is the only container of which it can be said that the more you put into it, the more it will hold. -- Glenn Doman
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Larry Jaques wrote:
(...)

Ain't an aesthetic issue.
We installed a horrendously expensive hardscape walkway in front of this bay window. An awning that dropped down far enough to block the rays of the afternoon sun would take up too much of that insanely costly square footage.
(...)

I can relate.
After the first couple hours, I longed to be sitting in front of my boring old computer drinking ice tea, indoors.
(BFRM)

OK. I never did anything with flagstone but it is purty, installed properly.
I was snapping up some old 4" sidewalk in the back yard for disposal. My first tool of choice was my trusty 24" sledge with full overhead swings.
The concrete just laughed at us. Grr.
The little Hitachi demo hammer was more successful.
Noisy and Fun!
--Winston
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On Mon, 27 Aug 2012 21:01:28 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@bigbrother.net"

So solly.

You betcha. Digging a hole for a hyd floor jack and raising the concrete, then using the hammah, can work/help, too.
-- The human brain is unique in that it is the only container of which it can be said that the more you put into it, the more it will hold. -- Glenn Doman
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Larry Jaques wrote:
(...)

I'm worried that we are starting to think alike. :)
I managed to total my floor jack doing just that. I just *knew* it had a pressure limiter, so I just kept pumping the handle.
It didn't have a limiter. Whoops. Bent the piston, at about 3/4 elevation. I recycled it and bought a new one.
However! I did discover that I could lift the end of a slab with my hydraulic cart and shove a chunk of scrap concrete near the balance point of the slab.
A few good smacks with the sledge on the cantilevered end and one piece became two. I was just goofing around by then because I'd finished breaking up the pad the day before. I figured it'd help the poor foo^H^H^H hard working young men if the pieces were smaller and easier to carry.
I *never* want to work as hard as those guys did.
(I just sent off a couple photos of the cart to the metalworking drop box. I'll provide links if and when the files show up within.)
--Winston
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On Tue, 28 Aug 2012 14:49:25 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@bigbrother.net"

Practically?
Oops.
Whuffo you do dat, son?

OK.
Verily. One can also drill holes in the crete and then try lifting it. It'll break right there. My new hammer drill (HF, not Festool) works just spiffy for that.

Grok that.

Bueno, bwana.
-- Stay centered by accepting whatever you are doing. This is the ultimate. -- Chuang-tzu
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Larry Jaques wrote:
(...)

Heh! Had to happen eventually, I suppose.
(...)

Well Dad, :)
That was the failure mechanism. Because fluid was not vented around the lifting cylinder, the force was enough to bend the piston. I figured it was a writeoff.

My factory - second Bosch hammer drill goes into masonry very quickly. Almost 'spooky fast'.
I didn't think to do that though. Neat idea.

--Winston
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On Tue, 28 Aug 2012 21:28:17 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@bigbrother.net"

Ayup.
It's amazing that happened, huh?

That's what this one is doing compared to the rillycheaparse Chiwanese drill it replaced.

This is how it's done in the quarries, and has been for many centuries. http://www.granitecitytool.com/how-splitting-stones-wedges-and-shims
Grooving abrasively and hitting it with a cold chisel is another way.
-- Stay centered by accepting whatever you are doing. This is the ultimate. -- Chuang-tzu
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Larry Jaques wrote:
(...)

I admit I was amazed but in retrospect I understand how, by pushing that cylinder far beyond it's limits I caused it to fail.
Lesson learned. :)
(...)

Yup. If you've ever used a 'star drill' and sledge, the hammer drills appear miraculous.

AKA 'feathers and wedges'. Very elegant but I didn't figure I had the time for that level of control.

Also a continuous diamond saw of both circular and belt varieties. Very nifty and astonishingly fast.
--Winston
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On Tue, 28 Aug 2012 22:02:12 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@bigbrother.net"

Since there is no limiter, I wonder at what actual tonnage that thing failed.

No kidding.

And not at all cheap to rent.
-- Stay centered by accepting whatever you are doing. This is the ultimate. -- Chuang-tzu
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