Exterior shutters, Anderson Bay Window?

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Who, Where: Hi all, I'm an electronics tech working in Silicon Gulch CA U.S.
What: I have an Anderson Bay window in the MBR that is a real solar collector for the afternoon sun. The window measures: 46-3/8" H x 22-7/8" W (Center pane) 46-1/4" H x 23" W (Two side panes) I want to (Magnetically? Velcro? Screws into inserts?) attach some shutters on the windows during the summer months.
Why: The idea is to reroute some of that solar power before it enters the room, in attempt to limit heat rise.
When: It would be nifty if I had a solution ready for next spring.
How Much: I want to spend about $150 for materials, including primer and white semigloss paint.
Critical Information: My woodworking skill level is: Dangerous Amateur I have lots of metalworking tools but only a couple belt sanders, a power miter box and a 12" band saw for woodworking tools.
The local Borgs appear to have 'too-narrow' and 'too short' shutters. The shutter specialty stores I checked on the web can create the parts I need in the proper height as long as I order them either too narrow or too wide.
Ideally, I would just plug in the dimensions with my style and color selection using some website XML, then stand adjacent to the mailbox.
May I have your thoughts on this please?
Thanks!
--Winston
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On 8/25/2012 9:57 PM, Winston wrote:

Have you considered installing plantation shutters? Would be up year around but open and close very easily to adjust light and air flow. Have used budget blinds plantation shutters in 2 houses and have been pleased with functionality and price.
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Roger wrote:

(...)
I'm looking for an external fix. If the solar energy gets through the window, it'll just heat the room up.
Thanks for the site cite. :)
--Winston
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On Sun, 26 Aug 2012 07:49:42 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@bigbrother.net"

Not so much, if you can reflect it back out. That's one of the purposes of the white drapery liners and some window films. Be careful of window films, though. They may void the warranty on insulated glass panes.
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On Sun, 26 Aug 2012 11:46:41 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

At the insurance office where I spend every morning there is an almost totally glass wall that causes a horific thermal gain. Solar fil was installed and within 2 weeks at leat 4 large panels had failed. When the units were replaced, and again coated with the film, one more broke. It was replaced and everything has now been stable for over a year.
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On Sun, 26 Aug 2012 13:48:03 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Why didn't they just get panes with the film factory installed? It can be put on the inside surfaces so it isn't exposed to damage from either side[*].
[*] Well, that's the plan, anyway.
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On Sun, 26 Aug 2012 17:05:09 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

That would have required replacing ALL of the glass on the front of the building. That's well over 1000 sq feet of glass.
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On Sun, 26 Aug 2012 20:38:43 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

What was the outcome of the breakage? Did the film installers cover costs, or the film mfgr, or the glass mfgr/installers, or your ins co? The way it was described, my guilty finger is pointing to the film causing the glass to overheat and break, unless the film installers scored the glass when they cut off the excess. I'm curious.
-- The human brain is unique in that it is the only container of which it can be said that the more you put into it, the more it will hold. -- Glenn Doman
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I was thinking the same thing but his $150 budget throws that idea out. You can't get much, even at blinds.com, for that price.
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Winston wrote:

If cosmetics is of no particular concern - you just want to limit radiation, consider: * Window film, * Shades, or * Drapes.
Or all three.
We have a west-facing patio door. One afternoon, I measured the temperature of a black toolkit receiving full sunlight through the glass doors. One hundred and ten degrees.
Two days later, I installed radiation-blocking window film. At the same time of day, the toolkit was at ambient room temperature.
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HeyBub wrote:
(...)

I'll have to look into that. Thanks!
I'm a little concerned that the window would suffer from 'reverse-one-way' effect at night, though.
--Winston
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On Sun, 26 Aug 2012 07:51:35 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@bigbrother.net"

That's why low-E windows have coatings on the inside of both sandwiched panes, inhibiting heat gain and loss from either side.
-- "Bother", said Pooh, as he chambered another round...
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Larry Jaques wrote:
(...)

Wayell, what I meant was that at night, the light in the room would make the glass appear very reflective. Sorta like what conference - room windows do in a commercial building when you are in the middle of an 11th hour meeting. Not too good.
--Winnie
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On Sun, 26 Aug 2012 09:12:58 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@bigbrother.net"

Oh, you meant mirrorwise, not heat-suckingwise. Got it. Yeah, they do that a bit, but not near as much as a mirror. Just slightly more than plain glass. It's hard to notice.
-- The human brain is unique in that it is the only container of which it can be said that the more you put into it, the more it will hold. -- Glenn Doman
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Larry Jaques wrote:
(...)

That'll be what I learnt today.
--Winston
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On Sun, 26 Aug 2012 08:32:47 -0700, Larry Jaques

That is called "low E squared" in the business - and is almost standard equipment up here in the "great white north" along with Argon fill.
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On Sun, 26 Aug 2012 13:45:23 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Aren't triple-pane windows standard up yonder, too? Or have you moved to quad now?
LJ, who likes his nice, warm southern Oregon.
-- The human brain is unique in that it is the only container of which it can be said that the more you put into it, the more it will hold. -- Glenn Doman
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On Sun, 26 Aug 2012 13:55:59 -0700, Larry Jaques

Triple pane are becoming more common but there is a point of diminishing returns.
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Why not right now, when the sun's at its hottest?

Soitenly, Winnie. First thought is "Why in tarnation didn't he go with a low-e window in the first place?" <gd&r>
2nd though: use an outdoor window shade. Cheap, quick, dependable. If you have a removable screen on one side of the bay, you could actuate it from inside the house or rig an automated motor for it with a switch on the inside.
4' of shutters is going to be heavy and require lots of mounting strength, so that wouldn't be my first choice. How about an inside shade? Put velcro fuzz along the top and a couple pads on the bottom. White/beige/brown/black adhesive velcro is available from many places, eBay being the cheapest and easiest I've found.
Have your wife stitch up a piece of whatever fabric she likes for the inside, attached to a piece of insulating foam. I already have rolls of 1/8" beige foam which I use for my glare guards, so I'd pick that. You can go with something like that (sometimes available at JoAnn's or other fabric store, or at local auto upholstery shops) or with the 1/4" thick black mylar insulating film roll available at Borgs everywhere. Stitch the hook velcro to the insulated side and hang it daily. It will fold or roll up and store in a closet when not in use. http://tinyurl.com/9cd9de3 or http://tinyurl.com/8r7mvkm
I'd go with the external shade, myself. Cheap, easy, and it keeps the entire window frame from heating, too. A single, long shade would shield the entire 7-ish feet of window. traditional rectangle http://tinyurl.com/8toteje trendy triangle http://tinyurl.com/9zl3hpc sedate square http://tinyurl.com/9ee9zlk screen fabric, build your own frame http://tinyurl.com/8bzwync
Personal one just for you, Win. http://tinyurl.com/8s58e55 Enjoy!
-- "Bother", said Pooh, as he chambered another round...
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In addition to Larry's suggestions, for DIY drape type applications, Sunbrella has a variety of fabrics and Joanns presently has some clearance sales on some of their outdoor fabrics. I recently reupholstered a swing canopy and seat cushions with Joann's on-sale fabric, $6 a yard.
Sonny
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