explosive situation?

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OK, dust can explode! But I'm not putting a candle in my DC anytime soon.
http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/JCEsoft/CCA/samples/cca7dust1.html
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Look ... if you think it could be a problem, grab some wire and connect the two together. You only get the spark where there is a difference between the two conductors. Wire keeps them roughly equal.
If you then blow a breaker (or fry the wire) when you turn the saw on, that aint static ... that's 'real' juice and you need to find out where it's coming from and fix it.
This issue is a perpetual football here on the wreck and the simple answer is the complete one. Ground it. The cost is small, the effort relatively trivial, the peace of mind immeasurable. (My plastic pipe lays on a cement basement floor and stays drained.)
The person who said that kits for bleeding the static from plastic pipe were hokum doesn't understand capacitance. They do work ... but they are solving a non-problem.
But the whole issue is probably moot since 1) you probably don't have dry enough circumstances to allow you to build up sufficient static charges to matter 2) you don't deal in a dense enough cloud of fine enough dust particles to matter even if there was a spark plug every six inches in your ducting and 3) your machines are not running long enough to build up those charges even under Arizona humidity / worst case scenario.
Relax, cut some lumber. Have fun.
Bill
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Bill Pentz has done a lot of research into dust collectors: http://billpentz.com/woodworking/cyclone/index.cfm and has some info on static concerns: http://billpentz.com/woodworking/cyclone/Ducting.cfm#StaticElectricity
After reading much on the subject my feeling is that a shop system will not be a problem. A dust explosion is a rapid burning. The static spark will have to produce enough BTUs to start a spec of dust burning then (almost instantaneously) the spec of dust must be close enough to another speck and produce enough BTUs to get that burning, and so on and so on. Impossible, no but not very likely.
The real danger in a shop situation is what happened when YOU feel the shock from a static discharge. Does your hand suddenly and involuntarily jump into that spinning saw blade? Do you best to eliminate static for this reason.
RayV wrote:

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Ray,
This topic has been hashed since I was a regular over 6 years ago on the wreck. I can tell you that I had a similar occurrence with my original setup (which is similar to yours). I grounded everything and never took the chance. Could it happen? Under the right circumstances - sure. Do you have the right circumstances for it to happen? Why take the chance. $10 for the ground wire and attach it to your TS or whatever and it's done. I had a sanding table that created some extremely "fine" dust and never had a problem. The $10 was just an insurance policy that gave me that added peace of mind. Lew Hodgett is a very well read and versed guy who give can you probably all the stats you'd ever need. I've read some of his responses and he's correct in his writings. If there's a doubt - remove it and ground them. Best of luck to you.
Jim
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