Excess T&G Hickory Flooring scraps as a table top?


Would I have a wood movement problem if I made a table top from a sheey of baltic birch (probably 3/4'ths inch) and covered it with 3/4'ths inch tongue and groove hickory planks I had left over from doing a wood floor? I want to glue the T&G to the baltic birch and then trim the sides with hickory, too.
I'll coat all sides with polyurathane........
Opinions?
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Never Enough Money wrote:
Would I have a wood movement problem if I made a table top from a sheey
of baltic birch (probably 3/4'ths inch) and covered it with 3/4'ths inch tongue and groove hickory planks I had left over from doing a wood
floor? I want to glue the T&G to the baltic birch and then trim the sides with hickory, too. I'll coat all sides with polyurathane
Although I'm not sure of the woods properties, I'll bet you will have difficulties down the road with this set-up. Tom
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I did that years ago, and had no problem with the top. I had a flooring supplier drop a line of teak flooring that was sawed up into 12"x12" squares, and I got the sample pieces.
Here is what I did: I bought a piece of tempered masonite and direct glued the tiles to the masonite using a flooring mastic formulated for wood flooring. (Read here: elastomeric adhesive with great elasticity.) I used masonite because I wanted a surface that was completely smooth and had a hard, closed surface to retard the glue set time.
No nails were used on that part. I cut a pieced of plywood from the old scrap pile (probably B/C or soemthing like that) and then glued and clamped the whole masonite/teak floor top down to the plywood. Made a 2 1/2" rim to cover all the nasty edges from some complimentary wood stained to match the teak as closely as possible.
Screwed it to a used black iron pedestal table stand that I got from a restaurant supply.
It looks great. It works well an has not had any joint seperation or buckling because it stays inside the house where it is in a relatively stable environment. Before you put your planks down, leave them in the house for about two weeks to stabilize. Also, if you do use the birch underlay, then stabilize the surface with a good latex sealer (cheap, cheap) before glueing and/or nailing and those planks will stay on for a long time.
Robert
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Sounds like a waste of good hickory to use 3/4" on top of 3/4" plywood. Why not resaw the hickory into 1/8" thick pieces on the bndsaw? That's more than enough to sand down to a nice flat surface. and you will have lots left over for another project.
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JuanKnigher said "Sounds like a waste of good hickory to use 3/4" on top of 3/4" plywood. Why not resaw the hickory into 1/8" thick pieces on the bndsaw? That's more than enough to sand down to a nice flat surface. and you will have lots left over for another project. "
Excellent suggesstion.
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I'm not sure that I'd want that thin a veneer on my table top. I tend to pound things there, once in a while.
My 'workbench in a weekend' plan, from ShopNotes I think, has a top of three layers of 3/4" cabinet ply, with a 1+" thick fire-rated MDF door on top of that.
Maybe I'll make a fancy Euro bench when I get more studio space...
Patriarch
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