Excellent glue brush.. maybe

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I have been using these. They are reusable and great. But during a carcas glue up the other day I could not control the amount of glue running all over the place.
http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?pH479&cat=1,110,42967
Rockler just came out with these: http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page1128 which look much better. Seems if I put too much glue out, the brush will spread it out more evenly without it dripping all over the place. Kind of like my flux brushes used to do. Looks like a few of these will replace the gross of flux brushes I used to get.
And the spreaders up top will still be handy...
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On 4/12/12 12:24 PM, tiredofspam wrote:

I like the looks of that Rockler one. I've used silicone with wood glue and the dried glue literally falls right off the stuff. I can't use a flux brush without it leaving behind at least a few little hairs in the joint.
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On 4/12/2012 12:36 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

Been using one all week from Rockler. Gets my +1, FWIW.
Leon has what looks similar to the ones from LV ... they are great for spreading glue in mortises, and a bit more flexible on the spade end (opposite end from the brush) than on the Rockler version.
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I just saw a review of the rockler brush
http://www.newwoodworker.com/reviews/rckglubrsh.html
John S.
On 04/12/2012 12:24 PM, tiredofspam wrote:

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Hobby type work only: I use a putty knife if I have lots of or large flat surfaces to glue up. For dowel holes, mortises and the like, I use Q-Tips.
Sonny
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On 4/12/2012 8:35 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I tried Qtips once.....I find that the cotton pull off of the stick....
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I find the best spreaders for large flat areas are expired credit cards, "sample" credit cards that come in mailed ads, membership cards and point collector cards. They come in various thicknesses which makes them good to spread glue, they are easy to trim to get into tight areas and the glue usually will peel off once it is dried. I get more than I can use from various mailings.
I find that acid brushes work best in holes, dados and difficult areas.
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Yep, I have a collection of expired cards.
I take a small needle file and put some little grooves in them sometimes for very wide area gluing. Just to be sure there's enough glue there when I clamp down hard, or put it in the vaccum bag.
On 4/13/2012 10:47 AM, EXT wrote:

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On Friday, April 13, 2012 7:47:21 AM UTC-7, EXT wrote:

True dat. You can also get plastic sheet material at your local hobby shop; the 0.020" thickness is a good approximation. If your glues, though, aren't the water-based kind, they can soften the plastic.
Then, it's back to tongue depressors and popsicle sticks (and I've pulled wood adjustment wedges from my stock, too).
For glues like the liquid-nails goo, those notched spreader things intended for flooring are also quite useful. It's easier to control the quantity per unit area that way.
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On Thursday, April 12, 2012 9:35:02 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I use a brush for mortises, but for edge gluing and large surfaces I always use a paint roller with a glue in a paint tray if I have a lot to do, or I just roll it in with what's called a brayer. I like the brayer because it leaves a nice even film of glue. I think most folks use way too much glue, at least from what I see in my shop.
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"JayPique" wrote in message wrote:

I use a brush for mortises, but for edge gluing and large surfaces I always use a paint roller with a glue in a paint tray if I have a lot to do, or I just roll it in with what's called a brayer. I like the brayer because it leaves a nice even film of glue. I think most folks use way too much glue, at least from what I see in my shop. ================================================================================================================I use the brayer myself. Spreads nicely.
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On 4/12/2012 12:24 PM, tiredofspam wrote:

I have been using the multi colored plastic ones for years but strictly to put glue down inside of a Domino mortise. It should work great for biscuit slits also. They work great for that. I was never impressed for spreading glue along a surface.
I use the acid brushes for spreading glue on surfaces.
Seems like the new Rockler bush might address both needs.
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On 4/13/2012 6:25 AM, Leon wrote:

I'm happy with the smooth way the brush end of the Rockler applicator spreads glue in dadoes and on panel edges, but careful you don't over apply the glue at first, as the brush head holds a lot more than an acid brush..
I prefer the flexibility of yours on the spreader end ... the Rockler is a much stiffer; not as unyielding a stick, but pretty stiff.
Easily worth the $4, IMO ... if for nothing else but the ease of cleaning and re-usability.
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On 4/12/2012 12:24 PM, tiredofspam wrote:

And for wide gluing surfaces.... I saw these about a year ago in a cooking store. When I saw the Rockler brush a few months ago I thought of this one..
http://cookware.lecreuset.com/cookware/product_Revolution%E2%84%A2-Basting-Brush_10151_-1_20002_10298_15555
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On 4/13/2012 6:44 AM, Leon wrote:

http://cookware.lecreuset.com/cookware/product_Revolution%E2%84%A2-Basting-Brush_10151_-1_20002_10298_15555 I have one of those for spreading BBQ sauce. Never dawned on me to use it for spreading glue until I picked up a couple of the Rockler glue brushes. ;)
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On 4/13/2012 6:56 AM, Swingman wrote:

Since you are color challenged, ;~) Don't try to glue up a panel with BBQ sauce... Your blood hound sensitive nose should help in that respect. ;~0
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You can't cook without a nose.
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"tiredofspam" <nospam.nospam.com> wrote in message

As a poor person, I use watercolor brushes on my joints for doors and it works well. Cost is about 10 cents each and I stick them into water when I am finished and rinse them out later for reuse. Also, I like slower-setting glues.
As far as glue running all over the place, there needs to be some squeeze-out to assure one that there is enough glue, that the glue has not set up partially, and that it goes into all areas. Usually, I just put a bead on the edge and smooth it out with my fingers. I do this also on panel glue-ups.
I use rags and water for cleaning the excess. For me, I learned not to let too much glue get to the place where the rail, stile, and panel meet on doors, as it is sooo hard to clean. I have had no failures by leaving it little bit dry in that place.
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take a look at this! (they have a lot of other net stuff too)
http://www.fastcap.com/estore/pc/Glue-Nip-3p42811.htm
shelly
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On Sun, 15 Apr 2012 15:35:39 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@stny.rr.com"

I just spent an enjoyable hour looking at all the stuff on that site.
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